Skip to main content

Questions tagged [aquinas]

[St. Thomas Aquinas][1] (1225–1274), scholastic philosopher, Catholic theologian, and most famous commentator on Aristotle. [Thomism][2] is his school of thought. [1]: http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/aquinas [2]: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14698b.htm

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
4 votes
0 answers
25 views

Does hylomorphism have anything to do with the extremely broad use of "form" in scholasticism?

Introductions to the Aristotelian concept of form always begin with hylomorphism: everyday objects (like horses) are composed of matter and form. The form is the intelligibility of the thing (e.g., ...
Doubt's user avatar
  • 388
1 vote
1 answer
56 views

Act and Potency Prescinded From Causality in Thomism

Did the Thomistic Commentators, including but not limited to Cajetan, prescind potency and act from causal relations? In other words, did they consider the notion of potency and act as separate from ...
Lorenzo Gil Badiola's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
56 views

How do Thomists understand the efficient and final causes in planetary motion under Newtonian physics?

Under the influence of Newtonian physics Thomists have come to perceive the force of inertia and the force of gravity as the efficient cause of the planetary motion confining the final cause to things ...
MichalRyszardWojcik's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
123 views

Is it true that "What is supreme in a genus is cause of everything in the genus"?

Among the more popular scholastic axioms is the following: What is supreme in a genus is cause of everything in the genus. But what is the justification for this principle? Aquinas tends to justify ...
Doubt's user avatar
  • 388
5 votes
1 answer
150 views

How do Thomists respond to the medical condition of aphantasia?

In Thomistic epistemology having phantasms in the mind is central, out of which the mind extracts a universal, the activity of the active intellect characteristics of rational beings (like us). But ...
GratefulDisciple's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
116 views

Aquinas on the relation between essence, being, and existence

In Summa Contra Gentiles 2.9.4, Aquinas writes Just as active power is something acting, so is its essence something being [Sicut potentia activa est aliquid agens, ita essentia eius est aliquid ens]....
Doubt's user avatar
  • 388
4 votes
1 answer
75 views

Is Aquinas's "act is the principle of action" a tautology?

In Summa Contra Gentiles II.6.7, Aquinas suddenly claims that "act is the principle of action" (actus autem actionis principium est). Is this phrase supposed to be a definition of act? Or a ...
Doubt's user avatar
  • 388
3 votes
1 answer
44 views

Where in Aristotle's Metaphysics is Aquinas citing his claim about "two sorts of operations"?

In the beginning of book II of Aquinas's Summa Contra Gentiles, Aquinas writes Now the operation of a thing is twofold, as the Philosopher teaches in 9 Metaphysics ... A footnote is provided which ...
Doubt's user avatar
  • 388
3 votes
1 answer
410 views

Where does Thomas Aquinas give this definition of beauty?

Everyone quotes Thomas Aquinas as defining beauty as "id quod visum placet." No one gives a citation. Can any of you folks supply such citation?
John Harvey's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
61 views

Whether under Thomistic metaphysics the human embryo (which not a human being) and the later fetus (which is a human being) are one or two entities

In Summa Theologica a human being is a biologically human body with a rational soul. An early human embryo is not a human being. At some point when the fetus is sufficiently developed God creates a ...
MichalRyszardWojcik's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
120 views

Why real distinction in God gives act and potency composition

So Thomists believe that there are no real distinction between perfections in God as He is pure act and He isn't composed in any manner. But Im not getting how real distinctions between perfections ...
Vihan 's user avatar
  • 121
2 votes
1 answer
74 views

What passage in Aquinas's Summa does this refer to?

From Chapter 18 of R. A. Lafferty's historical novel Okla Hannali: There is an interesting question in the Summa of St. Thomas Aquinas and also in an old science fiction story, the name of which I ...
user14111's user avatar
  • 121
2 votes
0 answers
54 views

How does the Scholastic concept of synderesis relate to rationalism?

In Summa Theologiae I q. 79 a. 12 "Whether synderesis is a special power of the soul distinct from the others?" co., Thomas Aquinas describes "synderesis" as a habit to acquire ...
viuser's user avatar
  • 4,841
3 votes
2 answers
152 views

When the soul is with the body, does the soul change the body, or does it make the body as perfect as possible?

I would be grateful if you could answer the question above. When the soul is with the body, does the soul change the body or does it make the body perfect [or should I say that as perfect as the body ...
Frank Booth's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
39 views

Thomism: Has any Thomist created an ontology of nouns?

English philosopher John Wilkins wrote a book outlining a universal language, and included in it was an outline of a noun classification system for classifying all objects (both physical and abstract) ...
Fomalhaut's user avatar
  • 689
1 vote
1 answer
44 views

Is Aquinas' ethics a case of a supererogation-first system?

Section 2.2 of the SEP article on modal epistemology differentiates possibility-first from necessity-first systems. Per modal logic, one can take these as metaphysical readings of the order-of-...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
103 views

Can someone explain the terms "virtual cause" and "eminent cause"?

I would highly appreciate it if you could explain the two terms virtual and eminent. Please also refer me to a book or an article where this issue has been discussed, preferably extensively. This ...
Frank Booth's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
115 views

In Thomas Aquinas's Argument from Degrees, how does he mean that fire is maximally hot and the cause of all heat?

Thomas Aquinas is famous for having made 5 arguments for the existence of God. The weirdest of them is arguably the Argument from Degrees. To illustrate his point, he claimed, if I correctly ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
73 views

Is the premise of the Thomas Aquinas'es Argument from Degrees contradictory to the Third Law of Thermodynamics?

Thomas Aquinas is famous for making his 5 arguments for the existence of God. Arguably the weirdest of them is the Argument from Degrees. As far as I understand it, the basic premise of the Argument ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
105 views

Is obedience necessary for friendship?

Is obedience necessary for friendship? Aristotle doesn't speak of obedience in his discussion of friendship in Ethics bk. 9, but he does speak of a sort of friendship: concord, which St. Thomas says ...
Geremia's user avatar
  • 8,260
2 votes
0 answers
158 views

What difference does Aquinas's 'actus essendi' really make?

According to Wikipedia, Aristotle didn't have the notion of actus essendi. In fact, the contribution of Aquinas to the philosophy of being is precisely that he discovered that all Aristotelian acts ...
Doubt's user avatar
  • 388
2 votes
1 answer
88 views

In what sense is the polis/city self-sufficient for St. Thomas Aquinas?

De Regno cap. 2 n. 14: Now since man must live in a group, because he is not sufficient unto himself to procure the necessities of life were he to remain solitary, it follows that a society will be ...
Guilherme de Souza's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
141 views

For St. Thomas Aquinas, is speaking what is true with the intent to deceive a immoral?

For Saint Thomas Aquinas, the essence of lying (lying is always immoral for him) has nothing to do with the intention to deceive (Summa Theologica II-II q. 110 a. 1 co.): Accordingly if these three ...
Guilherme de Souza's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
322 views

Seeking insights on the origin of the term "Peripatetic Axiom"

I have been researching the origins of the "Peripatetic Axiom," which states that nothing is in the mind that was not first in the senses. While I understand that this principle was first ...
cricket900's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
118 views

Where did Aristotle say that a relation is an accident?

I believe Aristotle listed "relations" as one of the accidents. I am in need of a citation (or at least the name of the work) where I can find this in Aristotle. Appreciate the help! A bit ...
Travis Dougherty's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
141 views

What does the phrase "predicated of" mean in the context of scholastic theology?

In Summa Theologica's article on "Whether God is altogether simple?" (and I believe in some other locations), Aquinas regularly uses the phrase "predicated of." For example: The ...
EJoshuaS - Stand with Ukraine's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
110 views

Why is natural law ethics based on what happens in most cases? (St. Thomas Aquinas)

Summa Theologica II-II q. 154 a. 2: Nor does it matter if a man having knowledge of a woman by fornication, make sufficient provision for the upbringing of the child: because a matter that comes ...
Guilherme de Souza's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
478 views

Why did Aristotle and Saint Thomas Aquinas believe that the fetus only receives a rational soul at a later stage of pregnancy?

What is different about a fetus at this later stage to deserve a rational soul?
Guilherme de Souza's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
97 views

How can our country be our "principle of being"? (St. Thomas Aquinas)

Summa Theologica II-II q. 101 a. 1: In the second place, the principles of our being and government (nostri esse et gubernationis principium) are our parents and our country (patria), that have given ...
Guilherme de Souza's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
253 views

St. Thomas Aquinas on the purposes of punishment

"The punishments of the present life are not sought for their own sake, because this is not the time of final retribution; but they are sought insofar as they are medicinal, aiding either the ...
Guilherme de Souza's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
127 views

Why cannot man be his own judge (St. Thomas Aquinas)?

St. Thomas Aquinas, Summa Theologica II-II q. 64 a. 5 ad 2: One who exercises public authority may lawfully put to death an evil-doer, since he can pass judgment on him. But no man is judge of ...
Guilherme de Souza's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
358 views

What is the difference between "actus elicitus" and "actus imperatus"?

I have encountered the distinction between actus elicitus and actus imperatus, in the context of the will, in St. Thomas Aquinas's Summa Theologica I-II q. 1 a. 1 ("Whether it belongs to man to ...
Chris's user avatar
  • 31
5 votes
6 answers
1k views

How to understand Prime matter?

In the Aristotle-Aquinas tradition prime matter is the thing that underlies all other things in the world. It is described as completely indeterminate-pure potentiality, it was not created and cannot ...
ArAj's user avatar
  • 833
2 votes
1 answer
396 views

Question about the Thomistic view of God's attributes

According to Thomism, God's essence must be identical with his attributes, lest God has real attributes he is dependent upon for his being and "compose" his essence, compromising God's ...
Bob's user avatar
  • 387
0 votes
1 answer
83 views

How do proponents of the New Natural Law Theory (NNLT), such as John Finnis & Germain Grisez, define natural law?

I looked in the main books of NNLT, namely Natural Law and Natural Rights by John Finnis and The Way of the Lord Jesus by Germain Grisez, but I did not find a definition of natural law.
Prof Leon's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
46 views

In which part of his treatise on law does Thomas Aquinas provide rules for ranking basic goods?

I know that it provides such rules as I read it in an article but there was no reference to this statement.
Prof Leon's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
187 views

Is John Finnis' list of basic goods different in the two editions (1980, 2011) of his book Natural Law and Natural Rights?

I can't find it in the first edition but here is the list of the second edition : life, knowledge, play, aesthetic experience, sociability (friendship), practical reason and religion. On what page can ...
Prof Leon's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
218 views

Existence being analytic of God vs. God being analytic of existence

Elsewhere, in light of the idea that understanding is not a species of knowledge but an epistemic genus parallel to knowledge, and then in terms of an understanding logic, I asked whether knowledge of ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
461 views

How does hylomorphism solve mind-body and form-matter problem? How do they interact?

So, I have been reading Aristotle and Aquinas for quite a while, but their nuanced terms make their philosophy hardly graspable. It is not clear to me how do they solve mind-body and form-matter ...
Eauriel's user avatar
  • 163
1 vote
1 answer
159 views

How did the existence-essence distinction help Aquinas explain finite being?

In a tortuously compressed passage, Frederick Copleston writes [Aquinas] adopted the (originally) Platonic notion of participation, [but] he did not employ it in a manner which would conflict with ...
Doubt's user avatar
  • 388
0 votes
2 answers
150 views

How again can 2 actions be morally different when they have exactly the same effect (if they can)?

(i have something to ask on meta stackexchange or maths meta stackexchange, but I want to ask a philosophy thing first. In fact, I may not even need to ask on meta stackexchange after this.) I could ...
BCLC's user avatar
  • 219
1 vote
0 answers
519 views

Grim Reaper Paradox Objections

I find the argument from first cause, contingency, and actualization to be emboldened by the very compelling thought experiment known as the Grim Reaper Paradox. For those unaware, Alexander Pruss and ...
Luke Hill's user avatar
  • 321
4 votes
3 answers
498 views

If Actus Purus is true, how can God be eternally creator?

If the Actus Purus of God, the complete perfection, is true, if God has no potentiality, and He was always what He is, then God was a creator from eternity. But God could not be eternally creator if ...
Bob's user avatar
  • 387
3 votes
1 answer
150 views

How is a mere substance different from an "individual substance"?

The Scholastic philosophers defined a person as "an individual substance of a rational nature" (e.g., Boethius, Aquinas). I understand how an individual could not be a substance (it would be ...
Doubt's user avatar
  • 388
1 vote
4 answers
525 views

Principle of proportionate causality → the most eminent cause is intelligent?

In Five Proofs of the Existence of God, Edward Feser mentions the principle of proportionate causality: whatever is in some effect must in some way or other be in the cause, even if not always in the ...
Youssef Ahmed's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
302 views

According to Aquinas, what is the relationship between the substantial form of a bodily being and its act of existing, ie. its esse?

Consider, for example, an existing bodily being. Because it is bodily, we know that it is composed of prime matter and substantial form. Also, because the bodily being is existing (not just made up in ...
Ph Ex's user avatar
  • 41
0 votes
1 answer
846 views

A simple way to explain the argument from efficient causes for the existence of god according to Aquinas? [closed]

According to Aquinas but not originally, I'm not exactly sure whose theory it was that Aquinas reworded.
mira666's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
109 views

Where does Aquinas get his "logical-metaphysical presuppositions"?

In the Summa, Aquinas frequently invokes (for lack of a better term) certain "logical-metaphysical presuppositions." Here are two examples drawn from I-II, qq. 90-91: "that which is ...
Doubt's user avatar
  • 388
1 vote
0 answers
797 views

Why does Thomas Aquinas conclude that the First Mover is God?

It appears to me that the First Mover of any motion must not move only with respect to the change it is producing, but otherwise could be moved in a way unrelated to what it is changing, or moved ...
Internet User's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
508 views

How do Aquinas' and Aristotle's mixed regimes differ?

Both Aristotle and Aquinas seem to subscribe to the idea of a mixed constitution as the form of government best disposed to the common good. By "mixed constitution", I mean mixing between ...
The One's user avatar
  • 125