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Questions tagged [argumentation]

The construction, deconstruction and presentation of arguments for a position;

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Is there anything wrong with this argument?

The Constitution of the Russian Federation says, in Chapter 1, Article 1: The Russian Federation - Russia is a democratic federal law-bound State with a republican form of government. The ...
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Term for a phrase meant to end an argument.

Is there a word for "a phrase which is intended to end discourse?" such as "That's just the way it is" or "If you don't like it, you can get out" or "Deal with it" These statements are used in ...
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How do the premises support the conclusion in this argument?

The argument below is from the book "A concise introduction to logic". The condition under which many food animals are raised are unhealthy for humans. To keep these animals alive, large quantities ...
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‘The claim that I had an affair with Miss A and that I didn’t father her child is false’

The prosecutor asks, ‘Did you father the child of the murdered victim Miss A?’. Mr. N replies, ‘The claim that I had an affair with Miss A and that I didn’t father her child is false’. In response ...
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Logical fallacy — discrediting someone because they do something you agree with [closed]

A friend posted this tweet: The point of the person's tweet seems to be, "Since Trump is thinking the same way that Kaepernick is thinking, and Kaepernick is right, then Trump is wrong." Honestly, ...
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How to categorize a certain pattern of argumentation?

There happens to be a pattern where a discussant makes a statement about the world and his/her partner retorts with another statement or usually a question that translates the subject onto a ...
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Is anecdotal evidence enough to counter a broad generalization?

Is anecdotal evidence enough to counter a broad generalization? I just had an argument with someone who asked for a scientific study to back up what I was arguing for in order to counter their broad ...
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What is the difference between ampliative, abductive and inductive arguments?

I know all these arguments are kind of the same but what is the border dividing them?
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You disagree with me, therefore you are X. What is the name of this fallacy (manipulative trick)?

Across my life I have encountered this numerous times. One recent example: If you don't think those are a crime, you are not adult enough or logical enough to have a conversation with me. While ...
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no matter how large the environment one considers

Consider the following passage: (1) No matter how large the environment one considers, the origin of life cannot be a random process. (2) Troops of monkey thundering away at random on typewriters ...
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Is this passage about different reading speeds an argument?

The pace of reading, clearly, depends entirely upon the reader. He may read as slowly or as rapidly as he can or wishes to read. If he does not understand something, he may stop and reread it, or ...
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Is there a name for the fallacy where you pretend some universal fact is particular evidence for your claim?

I feel like this fallacy should have a name. Here is the toy example. Alice and Bob have one loaf of bread between them. For some reason only one of them is allowed eat the bread; they cannot share ...
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Is it possible to define argument validity as a formula?

Let A, B and C be propositions. Define ARG(A, B, C) as the following argument: A. B. Therefore, C. My goal is to create a formula whose truth value is equivalent to "ARG(A, B, C) is ...
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Extreme examples for exploring the scope of statements - does this technique have a name? - Is it a fallacy?

When discussing opinions with friends, I often resort to making extreme scenarios out of their opinions in an attempt to investigate the limits within which their statements hold true (to them). ...
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In a Descartes square are the statements just the negations of each other?

There is a decision making method based on wrapping problems into a Descartes square by answering 4 questions. I've tried to use it for my own decision process but I couldn't figure out what to place ...
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What argumentative tactic is in play when someone says “The media isn't covering this”?

I see memes about once a week which state, "The media isn't covering this really important thing. Shouldn't they be ashamed! Like and Share and FWD to grandma if you agree!". Similar posts include "...
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Is calling an argument a fallacy, or is the notion of informal fallacy, just a method of manipulation?

Indeed, there are ways of thought which are not consistent with logic. I am not talking about such fallacies here. All of formal fallacies, statistical fallacies or fallacies of relevance (e.g. ad ...
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How would psychological anti-egoist respond to the following argument?

At first, my theory of psychological egoism consists of perfect desires and imperfect desires. They are based on the notions of hypothetical and practical choices. Hypothetical choice - a choice ...
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What do you call this fallacy that relies on dubious transitivity?

Is there a formal name for this kind of fallacy that relies on transitivity between parts and whole? Some examples: The government is fundamentally white supremacist. Bernie Sanders supports the ...
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Why is Jackson’s Knowledge Argument (“Mary’s room”) widely accepted as being self-consistent in its premises?

I imagine you are already familiar with Peter Jackson’s Knowledge Argument, but for reference, here it is again, as originally presented: Mary is a brilliant scientist who is, for whatever reason, ...
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Can anyone think of any examples where begging the question is “the correct response” in an argument?

In a recent article Galen Strawson, on the topic of consciousness deniers, states that: To say that consciousness is really nothing more than (dispositions to) behavior is to say that it doesn’t ...
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Which artistic form (Visual, Audio, Literary etc.) is the best at conveying emotion?

I have always felt that art, at least good art, is a method by which to convey emotion - to imbue part of the artists soul into something physical. What do philosophers say is the best medium to ...
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Thoughts on Post-Structuralism and Post-Modernist theory?

I'm curious as to what you all think about post-modernist and post-structuralist methods of analysis, as in the past year, these words have been thrown a lot in the academic and political spheres. Do ...
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Is it irrational to criticise political systems and not their members?

Is it irrational or naive to accuse political systems about something, when political systems consist of people? For example, in a recent book, the German left politician Sahra Wagenknecht accuses ...
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reductio ad absurdum vs. argument by lack of imagination

A reductio ad absurdum is a correct way to argue. An argument by lack of imagination is an informal fallacy. But if a reductio ad absurdum is applied outside of a highly formalized setting like ...
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What is this argument called?

What do you call an argument where you try to invalidate criticism of a narrative work (I'm not sure what the correct term is to describe it) by using fact or explanation from the narrative work ...
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Is the following considered an argument or just a set of statements? If it is an argument what would be the premises and conclusion?

In every age, philosophers have compared the human mind to the latest technological gizmo. Currently we use computers as models of our minds. Seventy-five years ago, our minds were compared to ...
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How do I create a good argument that no one deserves the penalty of death whatever their legal or moral offenses?

A few years ago there was a case of a teacher who allegedly harassed girls in his school and it was claimed he had indecent material of children on his computer. The man was found innocent post mortem ...
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Is there any way disputes over a knowledge claim due to different interpretations of data can be resolved?

I'm quite stumped as to how to answer the question because it would be rather difficult to correct the interpretations of others...
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What are the premises and conclusion of the Functionalist claim that “matter doesn't matter”?

I'm referring to the logical framework (the premises and conclusion) of the Functionalist argument that claims that two entities with indistinguishable inputs and outputs are the same thing, "matter ...
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Identifying necessary and sufficient conditions in English (less clear cases)

I understand how the material conditional works and it's really nice when using it in propositional logic, but in English I almost lose my mind trying to identify which part of a conditional sentence ...
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Any good papers or literature about analysis of argumentation contexts?

Any good papers or literature about analysis of argumentation contexts? By argumentation contexts I mean the context in which some discourse is written in, like what things does it claim about, is it ...
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“There are no absolutes.”

A common criticism of relativistic moral and philosophical thinking, of the kind that flies the banner "there are no absolutes," is that by making that statement you are in fact holding to an absolute....
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Dismissing something because author cannot have direct experience in it

I shared some tips by someone (lets call him Andrew), and got response like How could he know, he has no experience in it. Who cares about Bruce, Charlie and Dave (psychologists, psychiatrists in ...
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Are these basic arguments considered valid and sound?

I'm trying to come up with some basic arguments to construct a philosophy paper and I am wondering if the following arguments are valid and sound. Thanks for the help! If humans have flaws then they ...
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Are there convincing arguments for dualism?

There are several reasons for thinking that the mental and the physical are essentially separate and fundamentally different. Should we be convinced by any of them? I'm required to give three ...
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Is there a logical fallacy for forming an argument where, because one does not do enough, their efforts are in vain?

For instance, if Person A says: The homeless are trash and should be treated as such To which Person B responds We should start to address the homeless problem by not dehumanizing them ...
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How to make a better choice?

When it comes to making a choice (especially big decisions) people usually go back and forth. Sometimes even remaining in a state of indecision for a long time. So my questions: How to make a better ...
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Why these two ways of constructing an argument produce different results?

I have two arguments which I want to combine. Depending on the way I do it I get different results. Argument #1 P1) If a person is A, then it's likely that that person is also B. P2) This person ...
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Information paradox: the more we know, the less confident we are

I've been studying critical thinking and come across what looks like a paradox. Let's say we have the following argument: P1) If a person is A, then it's likely that that person is also B. P2) This ...
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I wanna start - how to be a philosopher?

I’m a new student, recently I’m interested with philosophy and the origin of some word like: what is evil - what is goodness? And I wanna learn about whether philosophy conflicts with psychology or ...
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Is there a flaw in my construction of Descartes' argument?

I'm having a difficult time thinking of any flaw in Descartes argument. You can coherently imagine yourself without your physical body. If you can coherently imagine X, then you have reason to ...
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What is the name for X is too hard / hopeless to practically implement,. Therefore abandon X

I come across that kind of argument sometimes, and I would like to know if it has a registered "type of argument" or maybe "fallacy" name in the philosophical literature. The argument runs something ...
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What are some counter examples of Kant's moral philosophy about doing the right thing?

Kant believes that one way to find out what the right thing to do is to think what would happen if everyone followed the principle you’re following when you perform that action. What are some ...
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Teaching my son the difference between inductive and deductive reasoning

My son has shown an increased ability to grasp complex ideas, and one that he recently brought up was logic, more specifically the difference between inductive and deductive reasoning. What would be ...
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Does the Knowledge argument refute physicalism?

Is there any research that disproves Jackson's three premises? Is there any research which argues that Mary does not learn all the physical facts whilst in the room, because experience itself ...
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Is there a name for gradual dissolution of the boundaries between two objects or identities?

The basis for it is a mathematical principal of a limit, wherein a mathematical object is defined as a value or geometric construct that arises from indefinitely approaching but never actually ...
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Distinguishing arguments from Nonarguments

Sometimes I cannot distinguish arguments from Nonarguments. For example, according to the book "A concise introduction to logic" by Hurley the following is an example of an argument: "There appears ...
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Determine if an argument is valid or invalid

The following is an argument. Is it valid ? Abortion is not wrong, because women have a right to control their bodies. The following is also an argument. Is it valid ? All students love ...
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How to differentiate co-premises from chains of reasoning in an argument map?

How do you differentiate co-premises from chains of reasoning in an argument map? For example, consider the following argument from our studying materials: "Just after the Second World War, Germans ...