Questions tagged [buddhism]

a religion of eastern and central Asia that is based on the teachings of Gautama Buddha

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conditioned and unconditioned realms

While reading The Heart of the Buddha's Teaching by Thich Nhat Hanh about mindfulness, I came upon this paragraph: the Buddha taught the meditation on the Two Realms — the realm of the conditioned (...
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What is the link between subvaluationism and Buddhism?

Sorry for the indefinite question, but I am confused. I know and have read some research into Buddhism and paraconsistent logic: what is the link with that and vagueness? From the start, ...
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Was Nietzsche more compassionate than the Buddha's teaching?

I was chatting to a devout Buddhist about how difficult I am finding it to want to transfer merit to people that do evil acts. They replied that merit is just not something you can even do evil with, ...
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A problem regarding an impermanent hell

Regarding the Abrahamic hells, one could say that they are absolutely terrible for it is suffering without end, an eternal suffering; but there is a puzzling different type of hell or hells, those of ...
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Why isn't Buddha nature a soul?

I was thinking about 'soul' and whether what is problematic about it for many is less its permanence than its duality (reminded of my friend on the 'kingdom of heaven' "hey look, Jesus is over ...
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What is the "object of knowledge" in Buddhist theory of mind?

While reading The Heart of the Buddha's Teaching by Thich Nhat Hanh about mindfulness, I came upon this paragraph: "Remember that the subject of knowledge cannot exist independently from the ...
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On the framing of causality?

So I shall restrict Nagarjuna's dependent arising of phenomena to the physical realm*. The source of my understanding is "Part Two, Chapter one - Examination of Conditions" of the book the ...
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How does the Buddhist pursue meaning?

So I don't think positions like existentialism exist in Buddhist philosophy. I say this because the whole framing of causality is fundamentally different in Nagarjuna's treatise of dependent ...
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Metaphysical indeterminacy and necessity

This is similar to my last question, but now I am asking about a specific/different interpretation of vagueness. To fit metaphysical indeterminacy into this picture Barnes and Williams [claim]... the ...
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Nagarjuna on the mind body problem?

So I understand the physicists framing of casuality as follows: given an initial value of a system, say a cart on a piece of land. I add a fictitious (and privileged) initial condition, say a push. ...
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Parallels between Buddhist karma and Western philosphy?

I feel there are some (re-)explorations in philosophy which are renditions of previously explored themes in the east. Intuition Pumps and Other Tools for Thinking by Daniel Dennett (1995). In this ...
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Resisting a classic Buddhist Argument for Mereological Nihilism

I’ve been getting into mereology and this a classic Buddhist puzzle that he recommended. How can these premises be resisted? A. If wholes exist, then either wholes are identical with their parts or ...
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Is life the root cause of all suffering?

According to Buddhism, "There is suffering in this world; suffering has a cause; and the cause is desire." So, the desire to stay alive, forces us to work which causes suffering in the form ...
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What's wrong with aretaic consequentialism?

What problems does it face, either as a classification of Buddhism or as meta ethical theory in general? Another approach [to how to classify Buddhist ethics] is aretaic consequentialism, an indirect ...
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When enlightenment is tenable?

It seems to me in certain sects of Buddhism enlightenment has become so esoteric that it is an experience so unique that in the entirety of Mankind only one person attained this state and that was the ...
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What does Ñanavira Thera's Notes on Dhamma mean here, about a one-one correspondence?

This is from Ñanavira's Notes on Dhamma: The notion of sensation, however, as we see from the dictionary's definition, is an abomination from the start—how can one 'perceive the state of one's senses'...
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Advaita Vedanta and Zen Buddhism - Similarities and Differences

I asked a question about Zen Buddhism a few months ago, which called Mahayana (where Zen comes from) a fusion of Hinduism and Classic Buddhism. This would suggest strong similarities between Zen and ...
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Wholesome Actions in Buddhist Philosophy [closed]

I was thinking about whether the goal of a wholesome action in Buddhist philosophy is to reduce suffering (dukkha) or to "shrink" the roots of suffering, namely craving, desire or aversion (...
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Philosophy of religion

Buddhism is sometimes compared to solipsism. Discussions on this topic can be found on the Internet. I do not understand why Buddhism is sometimes compared to solipsism. As far as I know, in all ...
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Critique and criticism and counter to that, of the Karma doctrine of Indian religions?

The three main religions generally considered of Easter origin, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism have a common doctrine of the concept of Karma-theory and subsequent infinite rebirth of the soul (jiva),...
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Can reincarnation be proved using a mixture of scientific reasoning and philosophical belief?

Let's go through the logic first. The following statements are suppositions that must be chronologically accepted. Matter is neither created nor destroyed. Matter is made up of atoms. I am made up of ...
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Allegory behind Rebirth of life

Buddha says the ultimate goal of man is Nirvana or to escape the cycle of rebirth. By this does he really means the physical rebirth of life or there is some allegory? For me apparently it seems he is ...
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Question about the Four Noble Truths

Are there many causes of "suffering" (the first noble truth) or do they all stem from one cause (namely, unsatisfactory impermanence)? Encyclopedia Britannica lists unsatisfactory ...
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Are there resemblances between Daoism and Buddhism?

Buddhism, according to the Pali canon, seems to be ultimately about saying no to life in consideration of ceaseless cravings or will constituting it, whereas Daoism seems to emphasize the 'path' or ...
november's user avatar
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Is Husserl's transcendental ego God?

We will eventually come up against something that cannot be varied without destroying that object as an instance of its kind. The implicit claim here is that if it is inconceivable that an object of ...
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Did any doctrine follow Zen Buddhism?

My understanding of Zen Buddhism and it's place in Buddhist history is that it represents a philosophical and experiential end-point, a sort of conclusion to Buddhist thought. I'm wondering if this ...
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Does being able to train your brain mean or logically imply that you are distinct from your brain?

While reading Why I am not a Buddhist by Evan Thompson, I came across this quote: The category mistake is tied to a fundamentally unstable way of thinking about who you are in relation to your brain. ...
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The unanswered questions - logical or illogical?

In the unanswered questions Buddha asks "Is the world eternal? or not? or both? or neither?". Logically it is either eternal or not. What does he mean by the other 2 options? Those 2 sound ...
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Does Japan and Chinese Buddhism Teach Solipsism or Nihilism?

Do the modern schools of Buddhism Soto, Rinzai, Jodo-shu, Jodo Shinshu, Nichiren, Shingon in Japan teach Buddhists, Buddhas and Bodhisattvas any varieties of solipsism and any varieties of nihilism? ...
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Liberation in Buddhism

Since Buddhism denies the existence of the soul, in the theory of no-self, what is liberation or nirvana in Buddhism? Who attains nirvana? Who experiences cessation of suffering?
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How do Chinese and Japanese Buddhists perceive people?

I have seen many answers to similar questions, but they do not answer my question. The fact is that the Mahayana doctrine (which is popular in China and Japan) leads to Nihilism or Solipsism. I asked ...
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Are modern Chinese, Japanese and Korean schools of Buddhism viewed as egocentric presentism?

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egocentric_presentism Are modern Chinese, Japanese and Korean schools of Buddhism viewed as egocentric presentism? Are there any teachings in modern Chinese and ...
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What is a good book on the topic of evil in Buddhism?

What is a good philosophical book on the topic of evil in Buddhism?
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Does Buddhist anatta present additional problems with the "no harm" thesis about death?

Does Buddhist anatta present additional problems with the "no harm" thesis about death? I think Buddhists would agree that death can be good (an escape from some hellish existence) or bad (...
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238 views

Is a Yogacara any form of solipsism?

Is yogacara some form of solipsism? every Buddhist who believes in Yogacara should believe that only he has consciousness, while other people and living beings around him do not have consciousness and ...
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Different between Buddhism and Solipsism

What is the difference between Buddhism, Hinduism and Solipsism? Do all these religion say that other people have no mind's? If all these religions are like solipsism, then are all Chinese and Hindus ...
Arnold's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
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Does Buddhism espouse reincarnation?

If Buddhism asserts "anatta" (no-self), then must it also assert that there is no re-incarnation for lack of a soul to persist over time? I don't know how to square this doctrine of no-self &...
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5 votes
4 answers
366 views

Understanding "Emptiness"

One of the many sincere efforts by mankind has been to try to understand "Emptiness" sometimes by scientific methods, sometimes by religious doctrines. Recently, we are trying to investigate ...
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2 answers
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Is 'illusion' as viewed in indian philosophy founded on more fundamental concepts or experiences?

Concerning the concept of illusion of the world of common experience, as found in many systems of Indian philosophy, I am under the impression that it always comes as a "made-up" solution to ...
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Is Nietzsche's goal -- for the "overman" and "higher type" -- just 'forgetfulness'?

Is Nietzsche's goal -- for the overman and higher type of human being -- just the Buddhist concept of "forgetfulness" or dukkha? I am asking because it makes sense in my -- somewhat -- ...
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The Simultaneity of Cause and Effect in Buddhism?

Background So I received pictures of a wonderful book (Unlocking Mysteries of Birth and Death) and wanted to know about my interpretation of the passages. However first a detour (1): In a ...
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What's wrong with this reconstruction of Nagarjuna?

I was trying to add clarity to my concept of "rebirth" on the Buddhist stack exchange. Nagarjuna's karika, 1.3 (Batchelor) reads: The essence of things does not exist in conditions and so on. If ...
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3 votes
2 answers
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Why does an explanation involving a "person" appeal?

If the common source of the natural order and the karmic order is impersonal, we are still in need of some account of how and why it would be such as to produce these two quite different sorts of ...
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How does Buddhist soteriology link to the first cause argument?

Aquinas argued that the observable order of causation is not self-explanatory. It can only be accounted for by the existence of a first cause; this first cause, however, must not be considered ...
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Are there historical connections between the concepts of apatheia/ataraxia and nirvana?

These concepts seem very similar to me: loosely speaking, it's all about how limiting our desires is good. Knowing that there was contact between ancient Greece and ancient India, could it be that one ...
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Wanted references to the Phillip K Dick Total Recall (1990) paradox

The movie Total Recall 1990 was inspired by the book "We Can Remember It for You Wholesale" written by Philip K. Dick whose leading role was played by Arnold Schwarzenegger. The storyline is about a ...
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6 votes
9 answers
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Does enlightenment mean loss of all emotions?

In Hinduism, it is believed that any being which is free from pain and suffering and happiness attains enlightenment. A mechanical robot created in the image of man is capable of doing everything a ...
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Are Wittgenstein's propositions about death incompatible with momentariness?

Are Wittgenstein's propositions about death incompatible with momentariness? I think mean that death, which is a cessation that is not lived through, cannot change life, and we are immortal outside ...
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4 votes
5 answers
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How are 'voluntary' actions possible in the scope of Sam Harris's framework of free will (its absence actually)?

Disclamer: I am striving to understand the point of view, not to examine if it is right or wrong (makes sense or not, etc.). I have listened to two audio excerpts by Sam Harris, discussing his views ...
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3 votes
2 answers
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What are the relationships between Foucault's medical gaze, scientific investigation, and Buddhist detachment?

From this note from a clinical psychologist, the Foucault's gaze is described as: ... with this powerful gaze the physician could penetrate illusion and see through to the underlying reality, that ...
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