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Can the absense of something be a cause?

I wonder, can the absence of something be a cause? My first inclination is to say yes. For example, if someone is in a room with no air, the lack of air will cause them to die. But what really is the ...
user107952's user avatar
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2 votes
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what is difference between "trumping preemption," "preemption," and "not trumping"?

I'm reading Lewis's paper "Causation as Influence," and I understand the example of the Major-Sergeant command as a case of trumping preemption, while the example of Suzy and Billy throwing ...
유준상's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
29 views

The question about "trumping" in Lewis's "causation as influence

In Lewis's "Causation as Influence," in section 1.4 titled "Trumping," Lewis describes a scenario as a case where a causal chain can be said to preempt a potential causal chain ...
유준상's user avatar
4 votes
6 answers
1k views

Causation in physics equation

Granted that physicists have always been concerned about causation, the laws of physics stated in terms of equations have nothing to say about causation. Are they correlational laws, causal ...
quanity's user avatar
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-1 votes
2 answers
81 views

What is causation?

I suppose the common idea of “causation” to me seems like it is supposed to reduce to physical causation, at least this is a standard worldview in modern times. In other words, the implied metaphysics ...
Julius Hamilton's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
51 views

Reference request for texts on causation

I have been very interested in causation lately. I am especially interested in whether it can be defined at all, or it must be taken as a brute fact. I would love to read some texts on causation, and ...
user107952's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
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Does ontological commitment to unobservables in science give one ontological commitment to causality?

If we have ontological commitment to an unobservable like electrons, are we ontologically committed to the causal relationship between their existence and the observable phenomena we use to know that ...
edelex's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
53 views

topdown bottomup approach in complex systems

In continuation to question Topdown bottom up reductionism emergentism my second question is ; in complex system, like the economy, which are highly complex systems where it is often impossible to ...
quanity's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
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Justification for Aristotle's principle of causality?

[W]hen... a potential is actualized.. something already actual must be what actualizes it. This is sometimes called the principle of causality. (Feser, Edward. Five Proofs of the Existence of God. ...
Bob's user avatar
  • 327
4 votes
4 answers
448 views

If X causes Y, where does Y gain its properties from? Are they transferred over from the cause X?

Suppose ball 1 collides with ball 2 which was at rest. Then, ball 2 starts to move too. It is as though the effects property of movement was already contained within the cause and got transferred. Is ...
Myers Hertz's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
93 views

Do descriptions of what exist map to causes recognized by Man? Can we describe coherent models for broad patterns of knowledge? [closed]

EDIT 0 - To clarify, in the table below, the term God would be missing from it's provisional box for humans who map ultimate causes exclusively to non-moral, aka natural, types of cause. Sigmund Freud,...
SystemTheory's user avatar
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3 votes
3 answers
82 views

Are there any conserved properties in causation?

Physical objects do seem to operate on other physical objects while all operating under physical properties, i.e. chemical bonds, momentum, mass, energy, etc. A chemical reacts with other chemicals to ...
Wowser's user avatar
  • 213
2 votes
1 answer
63 views

Ayer's criticism on Hume's definition of causation

He thus laid the way open for the view, which we adopt, that every assertion of a particular causal connexion involves the assertion of a causal law, and that every general proposition of the form ‘C ...
Егор Галыкин's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
62 views

Why wasn't Ayer satisfied with Hume's definition of causation?

He thus laid the way open for the view, which we adopt, that every assertion of a particular causal connexion involves the assertion of a causal law, and that every general proposition of the form ‘C ...
Егор Галыкин's user avatar
2 votes
5 answers
98 views

Is causality perpetual? [closed]

Suppose causality were not perpetual, then at some point, it must have been created. Then there was a process that constructed it, i.e. a causal process. But we assumed absence of any causality. ...
Wowser's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
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Which one of Aristotle's four causes is this?

Consider this exchange spoken in a hypothetical dialogue about man choosing his own personality: Every phlegmatic man is made when he realizes that his original fiery disposition will become his own ...
Fomalhaut's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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What are some examples of inmanent causes and effects in everyday nature?

Reading Spinoza's Ethics I find myself fascinated by the distinction bewteen inmanent cause and transitive cause. In the Ethics comes like so: E1 PROP. 18. God is the indwelling and not the transient ...
GONZALO ROCHA DE LA CRUZ's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
64 views

Can agent causation be a “primitive”?

When we say that the ball falls due to gravity, we don’t ask for why gravity exists or how exactly gravity causes the ball to fall down. And if there is a mechanism, sooner or later we accept one of ...
user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
112 views

Do qualia cause effects, and if so, do these effects offer survival advantages from an evolutionary standpoint?

Can consciousness (qualia) cause detectable and measurable effects? For example, would we able to tell the difference between a robot that experiences qualia vs. a robot that doesn't, by detecting the ...
Mark's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
53 views

Hume says we can't determine a causal connections between objects. Why separate the system into objects at all?

A summary of Hume's perspective is as follows: When we reason about matters of fact to reach new conclusions, we use cause and effect: when a dropped ball hits the ground (observation), it bounces (...
BigMistake's user avatar
7 votes
8 answers
651 views

Is the principle of cause and effect bound to material?

I am having a hard time finding an answer to my question. The reason I’m asking it is to figure out if cause and effect could have existed before the universe was created. If anyone has insight on ...
Tristan Velez's user avatar
1 vote
4 answers
217 views

Is there any principle that requires only things that begin to exist have a cause?

William Lane Craig argues that everything that begins to exist has a cause. But what about the reverse? Do things that don’t begin to exist not have a cause? Do things that exist past eternally ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
118 views

Justice and general intelligence systems? [closed]

In a world of general intelligence systems. If an AI causes an accident how is justice served? This maybe due to the overlook of a human who is no longer there. And the reason for that would be it was ...
More Anonymous's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
68 views

Are there phenomena which are partially spontaneous and partially causal?

Events can be spontaneous or non spontaneous. Spontaneous is defined as occurring without apparent external cause. Non spontaneous events are causal, that is, there is cause and effect. Suppose an ...
Dheeraj Verma's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
125 views

How could we get over a seeming contradiction in first cause causality without jumping to anything impossible?

This post is showing a contradiction in the existence of a first cause, meaning maybe it's not possible for it to exist. You might not get this immediately so look at the second paragraph and read ...
someinpp's user avatar
5 votes
3 answers
396 views

Is this a good argument against mental causation?

If mental causation exists, then mental phenomena would affect the bodies of sentient beings. Then the bodies of sentient beings (and only they) would be affected by an additional set of causal ...
Sam's user avatar
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0 votes
6 answers
425 views

Please criticize my argument for a first cause

Salaamualykum, I would like this argument to be strengthened by criticism: Everything has a cause, by cause I mean mean something that "therefores it" regardless of your definition. if ...
loopit's user avatar
  • 119
8 votes
11 answers
3k views

Do non physical causes exist?

When we decide to move an arm, some argue that it is an example of a mental event causing a physical effect. But doesn’t recent science show that free will may be illusory and from a time perspective, ...
user avatar
3 votes
4 answers
295 views

Does choice exist?

I've been thinking about a few legal quotes that have initiated my investigation into whether or not choice actually exists: A "universal and persistent" foundation stone in our system of ...
Dennis Francis Blewett's user avatar
4 votes
7 answers
2k views

Everything must have a cause?

In a possible reality, if something came into existence without something giving rise to it, the fact would be that , there was nothing stopping something from coming into existence without anything ...
loopit's user avatar
  • 119
4 votes
0 answers
53 views

What kind of physical complexity is related to the axiom of regularity for sets?

Augenstein's exploration in Links between physics and set theory mentions Ulam relating complexity and regularity: There are several sources for appreciating Ulam’s ideas and interests. A collection ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
302 views

Causation in physics

Electromagnetic radiation phenomena exhibit a temporal asymmetry: we observe radiation coherently diverging from a radiating source, such the light emitted by a star, but we do not observe radiation ...
quanity's user avatar
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2 votes
4 answers
185 views

causation correlation and constraints

We know causation doesn't imply correlation and correlation doesn't imply causation. I was curious to know does constraints implies correlation or causation. If A constraints B and B constraints A ...
quanity's user avatar
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0 votes
5 answers
148 views

Causation vs. correlation

Neither causation can say they are correlated, nor correlation can say they are causation. Am I right ? Suppose there is no correlation between A and B. Does it mean there is no causal relation ...
quanity's user avatar
  • 1,375
-1 votes
4 answers
142 views

How can we establish that causal relationships existed in the past?

From Hume's problem of induction, it is intuitive to me that, for example, "taking aspirin in the past has relieved my headaches" is insufficient to say with certainty that "taking an ...
IAAW's user avatar
  • 101
3 votes
2 answers
130 views

Logical relations between reasons and behavior cannot be cause and effect?

I'm listening to this lecture on mental causation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RefjI1lGT-Q&t=1466s At 22:50, the lecturer says, "Hume told us didn't he that there can't be logical ...
Ameet Sharma's user avatar
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19 votes
16 answers
5k views

Why is mind interacting with matter any more problematic than matter interacting with matter?

So there's this supposedly an 'interaction' problem for substance dualism, that isn't there for physicalism or idealism. I've never understood this. So as Hume pointed out, we see event a followed by ...
Ameet Sharma's user avatar
  • 3,083
1 vote
1 answer
160 views

Does Hume undermine determinism? [closed]

The problem of induction (kind courtesy David Hume) states that causality isn't deductively justified. Determinism, predicated on causality, isn't justified. Ergo, free will is (at the very least) ...
Hudjefa's user avatar
  • 3,767
2 votes
0 answers
104 views

What happens to statements like cause must precede effect for the mental events for this model?

My understanding is that for this model (epiphenomenalism (?)) is there isn't mental causation rather a kind of mapping between physical and mental events? What happens to statements like cause must ...
More Anonymous's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
265 views

What is this idea of causality being articulated?

So I wanted to ask about the kind of causality when someone says something of the sort: "Communism made these people destroy their own society" or "I have a brilliant idea now I will ...
More Anonymous's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
191 views

What is the definition of libertarian free will?

I've seen similar questions asked once or twice on here, but I wasn't able to find a satisfying defense of libertarian free will. The answers seemed to be kind of scattered. So, I wanted to make ...
Zachary Bohn's user avatar
0 votes
4 answers
131 views

Do preceding events cause subsequent ones in a four-dimensionalist world?

I feel like this question has a good chance of having been asked here before, but the first ten-odd "similar questions" listed by the site when I composed the title didn't cover what I'm ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
0 votes
4 answers
197 views

Is butterfly effect always happening?

You are sitting at front of house with warm tea. Right when you drinking it with glass, there is vehicle accident at street of front house. If you didn't drink it at that time before, will the ...
Muhammad Ikhwan Perwira's user avatar
1 vote
4 answers
200 views

Are things "caused" by the butterfly effect actually caused by them?

I once read that even a humble medieval peasant merely had to sneeze to cause events hundreds of years in the future: "Not just Napoleon but the humblest medieval peasant had only to sneeze in ...
user107952's user avatar
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4 votes
3 answers
194 views

Does Newton's first law of motion contradicts causality?

First, English is not my mother tongue and hence maybe the expressions I will use are not very accurate. Causality as I understand is when there is a change, then there is a preceding event "...
Mohamed Mostafa's user avatar
4 votes
7 answers
3k views

What would reality be like without causality? [closed]

If there were no physical laws of causality (law of gravitation, etc.) would there be "events", what would happen in the world when we act in our day to day life's? Trying to imagine a ...
rux23's user avatar
  • 117
2 votes
1 answer
172 views

Who has defended a non-causal (emanationist) concept of strong emergence, compatible with reductionism?

Often in debates about emergence, an opposition is set up between (strong) emergence and reductionism. These are seen as incompatible alternatives. In particular, if one believes in downward causation,...
Avi C's user avatar
  • 986
1 vote
2 answers
232 views

Causation vs correlation in the context of physics

How to know whether A and B is causal or correlated? Is it correct to say that physicists have always been concerned about causation? The laws of physics are stated in terms of equations that have ...
quanity's user avatar
  • 1,375
0 votes
0 answers
71 views

An argument against Hume's idea of necessary connection

In section 7 of the Enquiry Hume talks about necessary connection being an ambiguous metaphysical concept since even though we see events happening one after another (ex. hitting a billiard ball ...
R Samuel's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
688 views

causality vs determinism

Does causality implies determinism? Causation is a necessary relation between cause and effect and I consider determinism as "state of the future will be uniquely fixed by the past's state " ...
reza-ebadi's user avatar