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Questions tagged [continental-philosophy]

The term `continental philosophy` refers to the trends of philosophy prevalent in the European continent, particularly in 19th-20th century France and Germany. Philosophical ideas that fall beneath the title of continental philosophy include: German idealism, phenomenology, existentialism and deconstruction. Notable thinkers include Edmund Husserl, Franz Brentano, Martin Heidegger, Jean-Paul Sartre, Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Jacques Derrida.

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Do some continental philosophers deliberately obfuscate their writing? Why?

In /r/philosophy a Redditor claims that certain continental philosophers deliberately write in a muddled (obscure, complicated) style; because they believe that to truly understand some ideas, a ...
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What is the origin of the Continental vs. Analytic divide?

There's been much ado about the divisiveness between Heidegger and Husserl fans on the one side, with Frege and Russell stalwarts on the other. I'm mostly amused by accounts of name-calling between ...
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Can philosophy overcome “the two cultures” divide?

Snow noted a growing divide between "the two cultures" in Western society, scientists and "literary intellectuals", who became increasingly self-absorbed and incomprehensible to each other. One of ...
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What is the difference between Derrida's Deconstruction and Heidegger's Destruktion?

Derrida's deconstruction, as far as I understand it, is to critically examine values as embodied in binary situations like signifier and signified where there is an implicit hierarchy of value - one ...
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Why should we listen to Michel Foucault if he based his arguments on biased historical claims?

I have only recently heard about philosophical ideas of Michel Foucault from a friend of mine. His claims, those concerning madness for example, sound iconoclastic to me. After looking up some ...
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What were the most significant historical influences of continental philosophy?

"Continental philosophy includes the following movements: German idealism, phenomenology, existentialism (and its antecedents, such as the thought of Kierkegaard and Nietzsche), hermeneutics, ...
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Which philosophers have done most to bridge the analytic/continental divide?

I am interested to find out work done in this direction by prominent philosophers in each tradition. My paradigm cases would be Richard Rorty on the analytic side and Alain Badiou on the continental ...
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What are the chances one can write and publish a philosophical book without formal education?

My question is very simple: what are the chances one can get a philosophy book (in the tradition of continental philosophy) published and delivered to a wide audience if one does not hold any degrees/...
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What are some good resources for Analytically trained philosophers to get into more “continental” figures?

My question is similar to this one and this one, but with a slightly different spin. I am interested in knowing who are some analytically trained philosophers who write on historically "continental" ...
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What is multiplicity for Deleuze?

The SEP explains in its introduction to Deleuze that "Deleuze conceived of philosophy as the production of concepts, and he characterized himself as a “pure metaphysician.” In his magnum opus ...
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Are there any books about postmodernism being like sophism?

I still find myself relatively often surprised by how much of the spectrum of philosophic thought was already covered at the times of ancient Greece or ancient China (think Axial Age or think ...
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Deleuzian finitism and Spinozian infinitism

In the IEP entry on Deluze, there is the following: Commenting on Lucretius, Deleuze makes the following, extremely similar, remark: "The speculative object and the practical object of ...
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How do we understand something?

Is there some theory that explains this. When I reflect on how I reason through to an understanding of something (the Eureka moment), it appears that to me that the steps are never sufficient and that ...
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Was Deleuze's understanding of the infinitesimal calculus primitive?

According to the SEP: Deleuze was one of the targets of the polemic in Sokal and Bricmont 1999. As much of their chapter on Deleuze consists of exasperated exclamations of incomprehension, it is ...
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Is Western Philosophy Inherently Patriarchal and Mono-racial? [closed]

Philosophy has always been a powerful social institution, even before the Athenian “Golden Age” and its professionalization over the last few centuries. Still, many give a deflationary account of its ...
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Do durations really end?

Leading on from this question here. I am trying to construct an understanding of why Husserl and Derrida in Aporias might believe in immortality (though perhaps neither do.) Do any of the ...
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Does Spinoza's God have an essence?

Referring by "God" to Spinoza's God (that is, one may substitute "God" with "Nature" following the title of this question can be "On Nature and Nature's Essence and Essence") and capitalizing this as ...
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The Soil of Being and Time

In Being and Time, Heidegger claims that an analysis of Dasein is preparatory in that it is guided by the task of working out the question of being. In particular, its purpose is to "uncover the soil" ...