Questions tagged [epistemology]

Epistemology is the study of knowledge, acquisition thereof, and the justification of belief in a given claim.

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Exploring Methods for Articulating the Ineffable Nature of Emotions: Philosophical Insights Needed

In the realm of human experience, both emotions and colors possess an ineffable quality, challenging our ability to fully articulate them through language. This resemblance highlights a fundamental ...
Armaan Sood's user avatar
2 votes
11 answers
2k views

Could Occam's Razor ever favor theism?

In principle, could Occam's Razor ever favor theism over rival hypotheses like naturalism? What conditions would have to be met for this to be the case? BONUS: for those interested in naturalism vs. ...
Mark's user avatar
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To what extent are reasoning and arguments essential to bridge the gap from sense perception to the belief in an external world?

Let A denote the set of sense perceptions of a conscious being, and let B represent that conscious being's belief in the existence of an external world. Sense perceptions include sight, hearing, touch,...
Mark's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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Can Reformed Epistemology be considered a special variant of mysticism?

First, some definitions (feel free to skip this part if you are already familiar with the concepts): Reformed Epistemology In the philosophy of religion, Reformed epistemology is a school of ...
Mark's user avatar
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human life is based on suspicion and assumption, rather than certainty?

A murder occurred, so the police came to the house where the crime took place, and as soon as they entered, they found a person whose clothes were stained with blood and carrying a knife in his hand. ...
Muhhamedbinghazi's user avatar
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6 answers
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Is it possible for truth to be set by humans?

Let's say I create a video game. Let's call it V. Then I set a rule in V that you need to find a car in the game and click on it to jump. Now we ask the question of how to jump on V. Someone replies ...
Neo Granicen's user avatar
5 votes
7 answers
881 views

Trying to understand reality lead to understanding useless things?

If one sets his purpose as achieving the truest possible understanding of reality (I know one might die and not achieve it), then doesn't this mean that he needs then to understand all the things that ...
Neo Granicen's user avatar
18 votes
18 answers
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If philosophy is based on reason and rationality, then why is there so much disagreement?

If philosophy is based on reason and rationality, then why is there so much disagreement? Is it due primarily to operating with different premises absent consensus on their truth, so that dissenters ...
Just Some Old Man's user avatar
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6 answers
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Isn't the fact that we believe our minds are able to reason or find truth an axiom in itself?

I am trying to prove or disprove this, but I seem to have faced a problem: the mere attempt to prove (or disprove) that our mind makes an assumption that we can find truth means I am assuming the very ...
Thamsanqa's user avatar
4 votes
7 answers
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Mutually contradictory but simultaneously correct

In continuation of Two competing theories that are logically inconsistent my second question is there can be a theory/framework which can be interpreted in many mutually contradictory but ...
quanity's user avatar
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What are appropriate limits to good faith?

This is a question about normative theories in the philosophy of science and epistemology, I would like to know how I as a research scientist / mathematician should treat "cranks." I am not ...
Patrick Nicodemus's user avatar
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Do descriptions of what exist map to causes recognized by Man? Can we describe coherent models for broad patterns of knowledge? [closed]

EDIT 0 - To clarify, in the table below, the term God would be missing from it's provisional box for humans who map ultimate causes exclusively to non-moral, aka natural, types of cause. Sigmund Freud,...
SystemTheory's user avatar
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3 answers
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Are there any conserved properties in causation?

Physical objects do seem to operate on other physical objects while all operating under physical properties, i.e. chemical bonds, momentum, mass, energy, etc. A chemical reacts with other chemicals to ...
Wowser's user avatar
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1 answer
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Under what conditions could all of reality be reduced to a formal system?

It would be very convenient if we had, at least non-constructively, a correspondent formal system that could reproduce any causal event within the universe. The strength would be that naturalism would ...
Wowser's user avatar
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Are we incapable of loving ourselves, does love only come from the outside?

Love only comes from the outside, it brings you back into attachment to what you cannot control and instigate. Love is an alienated area that advances from the unknown, from a place different from me. ...
Hadibinalshiab's user avatar
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Why did Ayer consider every existential proposition synthetic?

....For, since existence is not a predicate, to assert that an object exists is always to assert a synthetic proposition.... What about math objects? If I say that the triangle with two angles exists,...
Егор Галыкин's user avatar
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Is there a philosophical or mathematical proof for "For any observation or claim, there's an infinite number of assumptions we presume to be true?"

Is there a philosophical or mathematical proof for "For any observation or claim, there's an infinite number of assumptions we presume to be true?" It doesn't seem to make any sense, but ...
Sayaman's user avatar
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Does space behave like a logical operator that applies rules to its elements?

I am asking due to being inspired by the following: Consider a particle system with uniform motion in vacuum not sensitive towards fluctuations, such that classical mechanics applies. Now, consider ...
Wowser's user avatar
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The problem of iterative skepticism

I mean the following tactics: Christina: "There is a tree outside in the garden." René: "I grant that this might be right, and even that your sensory information would justify your ...
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Can axiomatic (in-)dependence provide insights to the relation between natural and supernatural?

Suppose the natural world and supernatural world differ from each other by premises that both share, i.e. they are dependent on the same axioms. Then the supernatural should also be a subsection of ...
Myers Hertz's user avatar
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2 answers
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By what generic method do we correctly determine that an analytical expression of language is true?

The answer to this is a philosophy of logic question would seem to unify the notion of analytic truth across all formal and natural languages. This subject of this question seems to refer to the ...
polcott's user avatar
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Are there versions of Pascal's Wager in which the potential benefits can be realized during one's lifetime?

The conventional formulation of Pascal's Wager hinges on the uncertainty of awaiting confirmation until after death to determine the success of the wager. This assumes that the occurrence of death ...
Mark's user avatar
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-2 votes
12 answers
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Can God's existence be established through reason and publicly accessible evidence?

Is it possible for an ordinary individual possessing sound cognitive faculties and access to publicly available evidence to establish the existence of a God? Is there a prevailing consensus in ...
Mark's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
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Is there any valid Theory that Categorizes statements to levels of their truthfulness? [closed]

Is there any valid Theory that Categorizes statements to levels of their truthfulness? and if you consider this theory to be true what is the reasoning behind it? Because if we look we find that ...
Neo Granicen's user avatar
3 votes
6 answers
622 views

What's the least amount of things that can possibly exist?

Suppose there only ever existed one indecomposable, irreducible object. What could distinguish it from nothingness? From not existing, as there is nothing besides it that could deduce its information? ...
Wowser's user avatar
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1 answer
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Did what I do in this game constitute a logical fallacy or not?

Thinking about my previous question, I'm starting to think I didn't ask the right question. I'm making this to determine if I did or not. I don't think this is the typical type of question that goes ...
user8600's user avatar
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Examples that tracking theories of knowledge violate epistemic closure

E.g. in this video at 9:00, I have the same question as a user there: At 9:00, I don't see how the example you gave violate the closure principle. If he were in fact looking at a disguised mule, the ...
viuser's user avatar
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Is there a procedure for determing what's causing what? [closed]

I just ran into a situation in one of my puzzle games that baffled me. In it, I was in a room where lightning bolts were being thrown across the room. On a platform in front of the shooters was a ...
user8600's user avatar
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4 votes
3 answers
260 views

Does 'cogito ergo sum' actually establish the existence of an objective truth/reality?

Before I start describing my questions, I would like to draw some background on my understanding and knowledge of Descartes' ontological(metaphysical) views regarding the cogito and philosophy in ...
How why e's user avatar
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6 answers
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Is there a definitive answer to this question, or is it still possible that 'nothing exists'?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Why_there_is_anything_at_all There are a few answers, but they do not seem to be certain, and there are arguments against answers to the question, what does this mean?
Demon's user avatar
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3 answers
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Did i Just found the solution to radical skepticism?

If someone uses the premise that: 1=1 and then arrives at the conclusion that: 1=2 this means that the conclusion has proven the premise wrong; and if the premise is wrong, then the conclusion is ...
Neo Granicen's user avatar
8 votes
7 answers
2k views

I have an absolute certainty that cannot be refuted [closed]

Consider the statement "language exists in some way". You cannot question that statement, otherwise you're implying the statement itself, since a question is a form of language. If one ...
Demon's user avatar
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4 answers
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Do the senses themselves (not what they deceptively reveal) exist in some form? [closed]

Firstly, I accept that "I" probably don't exist, labelling a tree Barry and a baby child "Charlie" is the same useful construct for reference. Secondly, the statements "...
Demon's user avatar
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1 answer
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Can the AC-DC argument against infinitism be defused?

Infinitism is the epistemic theory that claims that justification is only achieved by an infinite chain of non-repeating reasons. At first, this feels like the "troll" theory of epistemic ...
viuser's user avatar
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1 answer
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Can existence only be reasonably defined as a relation? [closed]

Here is an observation: Things that exist are verifiable, i.e., there is some external object, within its scope of accessibility, that can construct its information. By ‘construct its information’, I ...
Wowser's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
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Two competing theories that are logically inconsistent

we say that they are competing because their logically contradictory if accept one of them we must reject the other.......to choose between them therefore we need to expand the scope of our ...
quanity's user avatar
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Is there a formal logic that distinguishes between a priori and a posteriori truths?

Briefly, In a previous post, I explored the question of if logical systems have any way of distinguishing between true statements that are obvious or tautological, and thereby not ‘meaningful’, versus ...
Julius H.'s user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
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How is it possible that state change exists? [closed]

We observe the passage of time, change in location of particles, reality is changing its state. Initially the thought arises that if state change ability were derived, created or began to exist, that ...
Wowser's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
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Reductionism from a philosophical viewpoint

Reductionism is the idea that knowledge at a higher level can be deduced from the entities and their interaction at a lower level. E.g. the claim that the properties of molecules can be deduced from ...
quanity's user avatar
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1 vote
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Does the universal "step-by-step" property of knowledge eg in The Meno conflict with the fluctuation theorem from statistical mechanics

Background: There seems to be a universal property of knowledge, which is captured under Plato's reminiscence theory (remembrance), that acquiring knowledge necessary involves a series of steps that ...
J Kusin's user avatar
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6 votes
4 answers
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Has Münchhausen's trilemma been solved?

I believe that the classic argument that conceptual regress goes back forever may be wrong. For instance, if I try to infinitely regress on concepts, I actually end up at a point where I can't go on ...
Lawrence Lee's user avatar
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0 answers
44 views

Would LEGIT miracles and prophecies serve as proof for a religion [duplicate]

Let's say that a random man comes to me and preaches his faith. He says that his religious book was sent down to Earth 3000 years ago and revealed to a man called 'X'. I ask him for proof about his ...
Abdullah's user avatar
4 votes
5 answers
652 views

How do we know if our interpretation of our raw conscious experiences is accurate?

X is a conscious agent. X has the ability to have raw subjective conscious experiences, aka qualia. But beyond merely experiencing qualia, X also has the ability to interpret their qualia, by ...
Mark's user avatar
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5 votes
4 answers
499 views

What is reason, and where does it come from?

It seems odd to me, to reflect that things in the world are the way they are, but not some other way. Maybe ‘reason’ tells us why things are a certain way. By structuring thinking, ‘reason’ lets us ...
Lawrence Lee's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
206 views

Is Hegel's system really without presuppositions?

It is stated that Hegel was looking to start his system of logic and philosophy in general with what has absolutely no assumptions, frameworks, or presupposed things whatsoever. Is this really ...
Gerald Robertson's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
50 views

What are the arguments for innatism, essentialism, and rationalism?

How do people justify some existents being absolutely necessary. Why cant it just be against a backdrop of a relative nothingness? How can someone justify certain ideas being absolutely essential and ...
Gerald Robertson's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
105 views

Do all theories require frameworks or assumptions to make? if so, why?

In philosophy class, particularly in epistenology, professors seem to have the assumption that to conceive of the concept of anything at all, including even this sentence now requires we have ...
Gerald Robertson's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
73 views

Do companions in guilt arguments wrongly assign the burden of proof to the antirealist?

Proving the existence of epistemic normativity might pose issues for some arguments for antirealism, like the queerness argument, but it doesn't seem like sufficient proof. There is one ground on ...
edelex's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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Which view is theoretically more virtuous: (1) metaphysical solipsism, (2) everything is real or (3) some things are real and some are hallucinations?

Let's consider three theories: Metaphysical solipsism. Every subjective conscious experience points to an objective external reality. Some subjective conscious experiences point to an objective ...
Mark's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
36 views

The knowability principle and the regress-theoretic epistemic types

The generic knowability principle is that if t is some truth, then it is possible for t to be known: t → ◊Kt. If foundationalism, coherentism, infinitism, and their combinations are taken as epistemic ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar

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