Questions tagged [history-of-philosophy]

The history of philosophy is the study of philosophical ideas and concepts through time. Issues specifically related to history of philosophy might include (but are not limited to): How can changes in philosophy be accounted for historically? What drives the development of thought in its historical context? To what degree can philosophical texts from prior historical eras be understood even today?

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
3 votes
0 answers
104 views

Who was the philosopher whose lectures prompted suicide(s)?

I vaguely remember from the course on the History of Philosophy that a well-known philosopher has once given public lectures, after which some people commited suicides. His point of view given during ...
Unlikely's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
39 views

Did Gödel admire Russell? [closed]

The way we view the erecting of Principia Mathematica and Gödel’s subsequent incompleteness theorem(s) must be very different now from how it seemed back then. PM was basically the first attempt to ...
Julius Hamilton's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
110 views

Is it knowledge about x to know that we can't know x?

I'm studying the Critique of Pure Reason. We have the claim: We can't know anything about things in themselves Which seems to have corollaries of the form: We can't know x about things in themselves ...
Mani's user avatar
  • 271
0 votes
3 answers
87 views

Is there a partly physical nature to infinitesimal limits that connects the utility of calculus with the quantized nature of small-scale physics?

One argument against calculus being physical is that since quantum mechanics has a quantized discrete nature, then physics does not truly have infinitesimal quantities. Yet, calculus and its ...
William Solomon's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
73 views

What are the earliest advocates for animal rights and/or moral equivalency between killing animals Vs. Killing humans?

The vegans make arguments that killing sentient animals is murder in the same way that it would be to kill a human. They argue that the distinction is arbitrary, and from a very rationalist, ...
TylerDurden's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
43 views

Which of the following are examples of Kantian noumena?

Which of the following are examples of Kantian noumena? a) Higgs boson particle b) A table c) A newly discovered planet d) All and none of the above [Mel Thompson - Philosophy in a week] The answer ...
XVI's user avatar
  • 161
7 votes
2 answers
174 views

'Philosophy' and 'Darshan' : are they same or different?

As in India what we call 'Darshan' (दर्शन) in Sanskrit, it literally translate as "Visualization" or "Realisation". The western term, "philosophy" literally means "...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
89 views

What value had Bertrand Russell attached to philosophy?

Late in life Bertrand Russell said that were he young again he would not take to philosophy. What value, if any, did he attach to philosophy at that point?
h_undatus's user avatar
  • 524
-2 votes
4 answers
132 views

How does one demonstrate that philosophy isn’t a time sink? [closed]

Why should anyone else’s thoughts on any philosophical subject bear any more importance than mine? You will read this and presume arrogance but this isn’t about me. The question is more general. ...
Baby_philosopher's user avatar
19 votes
19 answers
4k views

If philosophy is based on reason and rationality, then why is there so much disagreement?

If philosophy is based on reason and rationality, then why is there so much disagreement? Is it due primarily to operating with different premises absent consensus on their truth, so that dissenters ...
Just Some Old Man's user avatar
2 votes
5 answers
305 views

Have there been attempts at modeling 'essential reality'?

By "essential reality" I mean consistent aspects of human nature and those of our temporary and ever-changing physical environment(domain of science) as well as overlapping views on ...
Mark_NoBadCake's user avatar
0 votes
4 answers
209 views

Is reason under challenge? [closed]

I find the resurgence in the new century of pseudoscience, religious extremism, and irrationalism disturbing. Reason was pre-eminent throughout the previous two centuries. Is reason being seriously ...
Meanach's user avatar
  • 2,357
3 votes
3 answers
108 views

Is necessary existence a property?

If existence is not a property then doesn't it follow that necessary existence is also not a property? If it is then why?
Vihan 's user avatar
  • 121
0 votes
0 answers
45 views

I cannot find 20th-Century Philosophy: The Speculative Tradition, by Peter Koestenbaum. Where should I look for it?

The paperback series Readings in the History of Philosophy is an 8 volume series about Western philosophy, from the Presocratics to the twentieth century. The Volumes and their Editors are: Greek ...
Arz's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
1 answer
161 views

What are some ground breaking results achieved by philosophers from Asia, and why they are ground breaking? [closed]

A general question from today asked for ground breaking results in philosophy. The answers were not unexpected for everyone, who has been trained at a department of philosophy in Europe, North-America ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
  • 31.6k
3 votes
4 answers
905 views

What are some ground breaking results in philosophy? [closed]

Science has given many concrete results and we all agree upon its utility as in the form of technology. There are some gray areas in science on which we do not agree. Similarly for history , geography ...
Dheeraj Verma's user avatar
-1 votes
4 answers
499 views

If something is massless like light does it exist?

I'm asking: If something is massless does it exis? Because in Einstein's equation E=mc2 Einstein said and I quote: If something doesn't have mass like light it would move at the speed of light.
Ahmad Ghandour's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
96 views

Memory vs. Repetition in Deleuze

In the introduction of Difference and Repetition, Deleuze seems to contrast repetition with memory. How does this really cash out? Does this mean Deleuze is making the claim that memory is a kind of ...
Akin667's user avatar
  • 21
0 votes
2 answers
70 views

Do geographical directions have philosophical implications?

Is it true that the geographical directions express different philosophies on the whole ? And if yes , then in which ways ? For example West is different from East at least philosophically. East lays ...
Dheeraj Verma's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
89 views

Do some philosophers-of-mathematics give priorities to different epistemologies of math, rather than (over)committing to one epistemology?

Take Kant and Gödel, for example. Kant was neither just an intuitionist nor just a formalist, nor even absolutely a non-realist (the forms of space and time are, after all, empirically real and ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
154 views

Physics and the question of context or environment

This is a reality check type of question. I am interested in whether it's a valid distinction and whether it's been considered by others. It occured to me the other day that the issue of 'context' or '...
Wayfarer's user avatar
  • 574
0 votes
0 answers
19 views

What are the origins of the A,E,I,O notation for the four types of categorical proposition? [duplicate]

The labels A, E, I, and O are traditionally given to the four types of categorical proposition. Each is one of the first two vowels in the Latin words affirmo (I affirm) or nego (I deny), a usage that ...
tell's user avatar
  • 101
0 votes
0 answers
37 views

consistent textbooks on history of philosophy

In my country there are several philosophy olympiads for school students and if you win one of them, you get the opportunity to enroll in any university in the country at the Faculty of Philosophy. ...
Poor Knight's user avatar
7 votes
2 answers
2k views

Has Scientism drastically declined as a worldview in the last 100 years?

I have recently had fellow posters here question my understating that scientism is on the decline. I also have recently seen several members here assert themselves to be advocates of scientism, so I ...
Dcleve's user avatar
  • 13.8k
3 votes
1 answer
107 views

Did Hobbes start social contract theory?

There seems to be an implicit assumption in Western philosophy that social contract theorizing begun -- or only begun in earnest -- with Hobbes. As an example, this Stanford Encyclopedia entry assumes ...
flen's user avatar
  • 203
5 votes
1 answer
110 views

Are there similar theory to Nikolay Bugaev's idea of "emergent morality"?

I need someone's insight to put into perspective the thoughts of an author I discovered only recently. Although this author's idea seems very intuitive - the kind of idea you might have as a child or ...
user21102's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
147 views

How did Aristotle discover his logic?

Supposedly Euclid employed analysis (conclusions→principles) and not synthesis (principles→conclusions) when he devised his definitions/postulates/axioms in his Elements. How did Aristotle discover ...
Geremia's user avatar
  • 8,014
2 votes
1 answer
86 views

Kant's commentary on the faculty of judgment: did he anticipate things like incompleteness/halting/truth-undefinability?

First, to cite the (Meiklejohn) version of the argument: If understanding in general be defined as the faculty of laws or rules, the faculty of judgement may be termed the faculty of subsumption ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
5 votes
3 answers
423 views

What are some problems or counterpoints to Oneness or Non-Dualism

I have a pretty decent understanding of what its proponents think, but I can’t seem to find anything criticizing the view as more places link back to pro-oneness sources. So in to get both sides of ...
Craigory 's user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
1k views

Why did Descartes claim that animals have no souls if they have the pituitary?

As far as I understand it, Descartes claimed that the pituitary is the "antenna" through which the brain and the soul communicate, and he also claimed only human beings have souls. So, how ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
63 views

Where to learn about Gorgias' theory on truth and language?

The IEP writes in the article about Gorgias: In recent years, however, modernists and post-structuralists have found great value in the philosophy of Gorgias, especially his theories on truth and ...
viuser's user avatar
  • 4,761
2 votes
3 answers
208 views

What logics/philosophies deny the law of excluded middle (LEM)?

What logics/philosophies deny LEM, the law of excluded middle (tertium non datur)? This law is expressed as Philosophical Axiom 4.2: Tertium non datur (Non est medium inter esse et non esse. ‑ ...
Geremia's user avatar
  • 8,014
1 vote
1 answer
173 views

The disdain for sophism in Plato's dialogues vs. the real sophists

As we all know, sophism is regarded as the immoral, malformed twin of philosophy in Plato's dialogues. Socrates sees a fundamental distinction here: However, as I put it, cookery is flattery ...
viuser's user avatar
  • 4,761
1 vote
0 answers
87 views

What were Bertrand Russell's later views on quantum mechanics?

Russell touched on QM a bit in The Analysis of Matter, which was the same year as the Fifth Solvay Conference. I am sure he must have thought very deeply about the implications of the quantum theory, ...
Joshua Rubin's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
295 views

What is the origin of the account of Socrates learning to play the flute in prison?

I have long been familiar with a story about Socrates—that, while awaiting execution, he chose to use his time by learning to play a tune on the flute. An example of this in an article about a ...
Vladimir Moonface Jr's user avatar
9 votes
2 answers
372 views

If Hegel was so hard to read, how did he become so popular?

I find that it is a popular/fashionable opinion that Hegel is a difficult to read writer. See eg. If this is the case, then how did his writings become mainstream/gain popularity at all? It's quite ...
tryst with freedom's user avatar
7 votes
2 answers
4k views

Why did Pythagoras prohibit eating beans?

The legend says the Pythagoreans never ate beans because they contained the spirits of dead people. My maths teacher told me this was known because a bean and an embryo are about the same size and ...
Daron's user avatar
  • 934
1 vote
1 answer
79 views

Was H.G. Wells unduly optimistic?

I am reading "The Outline of History" by H.G. Wells. The Outline of History by H.G. Wells, originally published in 1920, Revised by R. Postgate, republished in 1961 by Garden City Books. I ...
Boba Fit's user avatar
  • 1,015
1 vote
2 answers
106 views

Who first came up with heterophenomenology, and when?

Dan Dennett, in his article "Who’s On First? Heterophenomenology Explained" (https://ase.tufts.edu/cogstud/dennett/papers/JCSarticle.pdf) says: "In short, heterophenomenology is nothing ...
Matthew Christopher Bartsh's user avatar
2 votes
5 answers
607 views

What are the intellectual roots of U.S. happiness and Western Continental Europe suffering?

Question: It seems to me happiness is very valued in the U.S. society (and maybe other Western English-speaking countries such as Australia, but I am not sure). On the other hand, Western Continental ...
Starckman's user avatar
  • 1,510
1 vote
1 answer
114 views

Did Aristotle used the term *contradiction* or the term *contradictory* in his discussions of *reductio ad impossibile*?

Did Aristotle used the term contradiction or the term contradictory in his discussions of reductio ad impossibile? Two translators who disagree: For all those which come to a conclusion through an ...
Speakpigeon's user avatar
  • 7,696
-2 votes
2 answers
2k views

Is there any historical evidence for Marx being a Satanist? [closed]

I recently read a controversial book by Richard Wurmbrand called "Was Karl Marx a Satanist?", and I found it very thought provoking. There are many historical facts that indicate that Marx ...
Dennis Kozevnikoff's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
41 views

Why the sudden change of Nicolas of Cusa's political thought?

Nicolas of Cusa wrote De Concordantia Catholica in 1433/34, and it contained pretty revolutionary political ideas: Going beyond tradition and canon law, he argues on the basis of people’s natural ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
135 views

History of creatio ex Nihilo

In the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy, it is claimed that Before Philo there was no explicit theory of creation ex nihilo ever postulated in Jewish or Greek traditions. Is this correct? Were ...
kutschkem's user avatar
  • 2,290
0 votes
1 answer
49 views

Definitive refutation of JL Austin? [closed]

Within the history of 20th c. philosophy, who gave the most definitive arguments against JL Austin's thought, and his linguistic theory of speech acts in particular? I'm also interested in any ...
LootHypothesis's user avatar
3 votes
4 answers
213 views

What is there to philosophy these days, other than intellectual self-gratification?

Preliminary notes I understand that the title of my question has a provocative note. However it also stems from a genuine question. I come from the standpoint of being a radical agnostic and ...
chasly - supports Monica's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
151 views

Academic consensus on Thales being hylozoist or panpsychist (or alternatives)

For researchers on history of philosophy, taking into account, for example, the typical beliefs in societies predating Thales', which interpretation, if any, is more generally accepted in academia of ...
user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
281 views

Did Nietzsche cite anywhere in his writings Plato's Gorgias regarding Callicles?

Nietzsche's theory has many similarities with Callicles thought in Plato's Gorgias (Nietzsche and Callicles on Happiness, Pleasure, and Power). However, he did not explicitely mention Callicles in his ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
85 views

Is Religion Necessary for Communism? [closed]

For example, Karl Marx wasn't anti religion, but he was irreligious, as such a fan of Communism I wondered how this is, as the ideas of communism fall in line with the teachings of Jesus. I'm just ...
Exenri's user avatar
  • 39
4 votes
1 answer
464 views

Advancements in formal logic in the 21st century?

I've recently learned a lot about the history of formal logic, from Frege and Pierce in the late 19th century, to Russell, Hilbert, and Quine (et al)'s development of 1st-order logic, to advances with ...
Nico's user avatar
  • 141

1
2 3 4 5
15