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Questions tagged [hobbes]

Thomas Hobbes (1588 – 1679) was an English philosopher. He is known for his 1651 book Leviathan.

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Does Thomas Hobbes assert that political philosophy or civic philosophy as it was known then, began with him?

I found this claim that Hobbes believed he founded political philosophy in multiple reputed places. In this lecture from Yale: 12. The Sovereign State: Hobbes' Leviathan In Leo Strauss and Joseph ...
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What is the Common Good According to Hobbes?

Two key arguments of Hobbes' in his Leviathan seem to be the ideas of "state of nature" and "social contract." If I am correct in my interpretation, it seems that once a ...
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Is there a difference between will and free will?

In Leviathan, Hobbes argues that it is not the will that is free but that which exercises the will. So is there only will, exercised by beings who may or may not be free?
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The private language argument and Descartes's private thoughts

In his "Thinking it Through" textbook, Appiah writes It is a big step from saying that some of our mental states are things that other people can know about, to saying, with the ...
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Did Hobbes start social contract theory?

There seems to be an implicit assumption in Western philosophy that social contract theorizing begun -- or only begun in earnest -- with Hobbes. As an example, this Stanford Encyclopedia entry assumes ...
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Inquiring about Perspectives on the Theory of "the People" as a Political Concept

Seeking your insights and recommendations regarding a specific aspect of political philosophy - the theory of "the People." I am currently exploring various perspectives on this concept and ...
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Can I agree to what I do not allow the sovereign?

Suppose we enter a social contract to bring about some power Social contract arguments typically are that individuals have consented, either explicitly or tacitly, to surrender some of their freedoms ...
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Is Hobbes describing a 0th or 1st Law of Nature here?

In Hobbes' Leviathan, specifically section The Fundamental Law Of Nature contained in Chapter XIV, Hobbes says: "And consequently it is a precept, or generall rule of Reason, “That every man, ...
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Who originally made a coherent argument that government is inevitable because in "anarchy" a government would come about anyway?

There is a generally known argument, which is that if there is no central authority that maintains a preponderance of violence, then there would be a kind of power vacuum, and some group would fill ...
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Question on Locke and Hobbes's views on private property

I've read chapters 1-9 of Locke's Second Treatise of Government as well as chapters i, x, xiii-xviii, and xxi of Hobbes's Leviathan. While Locke spends the entire fifth chapter discussing private ...
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Why is the Hobbesian leviathan less fearful than the state of nature?

In Leviathan, Hobbes argues the importance of self-preservation and the fearful condition of the state of nature, which leads to the formation of a sovereign power that compromises natural liberties ...
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Which conception of a " machine " allows to call "mechanical" Descartes and Hobbes views of nature and of science?

The word "mechanical" comes from a greek word meaning " machine". However, the received definition of mechanical philosophy does not contain the concept of a machine. This school of thought is said ...
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What does it mean when Hobbes says “round quadrangle” signifies nothing?

When Hobbes claims that “round quadrangle” (Leviathan, ch.IV) signifies nothing, what does that mean and why does it signify nothing?
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What is the difference between the idea of the "social contract" in Hobbes and Locke?

I have just read about them both in an introductory book to philosophy, but I am confused between the interpretations of these two people, of the "social contract" in political philosophy.
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Question about Hobbes' distinction between Error and Absurdity

I'm reading Chapter 5 of Hobbes' "Leviathan" (On Reason and Science), and I came across his distinction between Error and Absurdity. Since I don't understand it really well, I tried to come up with ...
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What does Hobbes mean by the use of the word "Fancy" in Leviathan?

What does "fancy" mean in this context? (quoted below) But their apparence to us is Fancy, the same waking, that dreaming. And as pressing, rubbing, or striking the Eye, makes us fancy a light; ...
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Hobbes on imagination: mental images or ideas?

Hobbes, in his book Leviathan, second chapter, says: So that imagination and memory are but one thing, which for diverse considerations hath diverse names. Much memory, or memory of many things, is ...
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How do Aristotle and Hobbes differ in their conceptions of the human good?

Hobbes argues that the human good or 'felicity' is 'continual success in obtaining those things which a man from time to time desireth, that is to say, continual prospering' ('Leviathan', ch.6). ...
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What is control of normative doctrine in Hobbes?

In Hobbes political theory sovereignty is sustained by certain powers; these are the powers of: legislation, adjudication, enforcement, taxation, war-making and the less familiar power of control ...
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What kind of Hobbesian power is bio-power?

In Hobbes political theory sovereignty is undivided; that is certain powers are necessary to sustain sovereignty, and anything less will undermine it; for Hobbes these are the powers of: ...
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Is the divine right of kings an expression of Hobbesian Sovereignty?

Hobbes famously declared that sovereignty must be absolute; his rationale being that if not, then exceptions not governed under its law will need arbitration by some higher power. But this power may ...
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Why wouldn't a government be as tainted as ordinary people according to Hobbes?

I have been watching an episode of Total Philosophy, on Hobbes' theory on why we should be governed. I was now wondering how it could be possible to achieve a just and authoritative government, if ...
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In the following is Hobbes paraphrasing Aristotle?

In Hobbes Leviathan, chapter II: The imagination he writes: That when a thing lies still, unless somewhat else stirs it, it will lie still forever, is a truth no man doubts of. But that when a thing ...
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Have social contract theories arisen in predominently mercantile communities?

The only social contract theory I know about, is the one propounded by Hobbes in The Leviathan. Can one chracterise england at that time as a primarily mercantile community. Have other social contract ...
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Was Hobbes a natural law theorist?

I would like to hear some opinions on a question I am asking myself due to contradictions in the references of my term paper. The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy article on "The Natural Law ...
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What is the origin of love, in Hobbesian philosophy?

According to Hobbes, Passions are identified as those interior beginnings of motion, by which the imagination eventually motivates us to action. He then describes various emotions such as glory, ...
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What is the difference between patriarchial right and the paternal right?

I am reading a paper on Hobbes interpretation of patriarchy, which says hobbes patriarchy is non paternal, i.e. he proposes a patriarchal right that is different from paternal right? What is the exact ...
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Question on Thomas Hobbes De Ciev, Of Liberty

This mans will to hurt ariseth from Vain glory, and the false esteeme he hath of his owne strength; the other's, from the necessity of defending himselfe, his liberty, and his goods against this mans ...
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Social contract by using government services [closed]

Do you enter a Social Contract described by Locke/Hobbes by using government services or must there be a more significent entrance into this Contract?
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