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Questions tagged [hume]

David Hume is a 18th century philosopher and contemporary of Immanuel Kant. He is best known for his skeptics views, empirical analysis, and naturalist positions.

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What were the reactions to Hume's problem of induction from scientists practicing in the field?

I'm well aware of all the discussion in the field of philosophy of science spurred by Hume's formulation of the problem of induction: https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/induction-problem/ My question ...
Francesco Ghizzo's user avatar
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1 answer
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Why does Kant refer to Hume's Enquiry as "otherwise uninstructive" in the Critique of Practical Reason?

The Critique of Practical Reason,5:14, seems to damn Hume with faint praise, acknowledging his service for initiating a critique of pure reason but being otherwise uninstructive. Was it in the ...
Gerry's user avatar
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Did Hume argue against partial support of a statement?

From what I have read, Hume argued that induction cannot be justified. But did he also argue that probabilistic justification isn’t a thing? For example, most of us usually have a notion of a ...
Baby_philosopher's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
167 views

Hume's Guillotine

I struggle to understand how logic doesn't validate the deduction of a moral judgement that's not present in the first premise, even if we add a second premise? I might not be profound upon the matter,...
Saad Sameer's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
219 views

Can the Humean argument against miracles also apply to divine providence?

Hume famously said, That no testimony is sufficient to establish a miracle, unless the testimony be of such a kind, that its falsehood would be more miraculous, than the fact, which it endeavours to ...
Baby_philosopher's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
61 views

Ayer's criticism on Hume's definition of causation

He thus laid the way open for the view, which we adopt, that every assertion of a particular causal connexion involves the assertion of a causal law, and that every general proposition of the form ‘C ...
Егор Галыкин's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
61 views

Why wasn't Ayer satisfied with Hume's definition of causation?

He thus laid the way open for the view, which we adopt, that every assertion of a particular causal connexion involves the assertion of a causal law, and that every general proposition of the form ‘C ...
Егор Галыкин's user avatar
6 votes
4 answers
1k views

If laws are just descriptions of reality, is it a miracle that things are regular?

From what I gather, scientific laws according to Humeans are merely descriptions of the regularities that occur in nature. Anti Humeans think laws have some sort of prescriptive/causal power which ...
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5 answers
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How do empiricists explain the existence of perceptual illusions?

How do empiricists like Hume explain the existence of perceptual illusions? If we only know about the world through sense impressions, how can we know that an object is not as it seems? For example, ...
John Smith's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
342 views

Can you apply Hume's fork to agnosticism?

Can you apply Hume's fork to agnosticism, as an argument for atheism? e,g, It's not contained in the premise of existence, else we would all be theists. But then you cannot inductively argue for God, ...
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0 votes
2 answers
92 views

What does Hume think about Occam's razor?

Let's define Occam's razor as this: That it is not rational to believe something unnecessary or extra about reality without a specific reason to believe it. In other words, the facts that are ...
BigMistake's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
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Does Hume propose that causes might actually just be explained by coincidence?

Does Hume propose that what people interpret as casual connections could instead be explained by coincidence? I want to know if this is an accurate understanding. Hume says something to the effect of: ...
BigMistake's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
52 views

Hume says we can't determine a causal connections between objects. Why separate the system into objects at all?

A summary of Hume's perspective is as follows: When we reason about matters of fact to reach new conclusions, we use cause and effect: when a dropped ball hits the ground (observation), it bounces (...
BigMistake's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
42 views

Does Hume's objection to causality apply to human actions?

I heard the example with the kid and the toys from this video (TL;DW A kid who has only been playing with cotton toys gets a rubber ball and is surprised to see it bounce. His father is not surprised ...
Dimitris02's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
252 views

What was Hume's specific view with empiricism?

I've stumbled across empiricism and Hume's view on it. It really interests me, but with the sources I've encountered, I still lack a clear understanding of his view on it.
Dawn's user avatar
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3 answers
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David Hume on Miracles

David Hume's definition of a miracle (refining, paraphrasing): X is a miracle if (and only if) not X is an even greater miracle. Is this definition problematic in any way? When anyone tells me, that ...
Hudjefa's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
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Does the Introduction of Teleology into Ethical Discourse Solve Hume's Is/Ought Problem?

For Hume, no one could describe objective reasons for thinking that a man ought to do something generally, becuase there was no way to derive an ought from an is. But, if a classical view of causality ...
jaredad7's user avatar
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Starting An Inquiry Concerning Human Understanding. Will this be fun?

As someone with a deep interest in philosophy and the intricacies of human understanding, I have decided to embark on an exciting intellectual journey, delving into the realm of David Hume's "An ...
cricket900's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
62 views

Does the claim of an is/ought gap presuppose relevance logic (at least for morality-talk)?

Imagine Hume's remarks but with reference to the usual disjunction introduction: In every system of conjunction, which I have hitherto met with, I have always remarked, that the author proceeds for ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
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Hume’s Empiricism and the Possibility of an Epistemology Grounded in Metaphysics

Was epistemology continued in metaphysics? Was the impossibility of an epistemology grounded in metaphysics made impossible by Humean empiricism in the sense that a posteriori questions of fact are ...
Assandra Lakal's user avatar
3 votes
6 answers
143 views

Does Newton’s First Law of Motion assist in validating the Uniformity Principle?

Does Newton’s First Law of Motion assist in validating induction? The Principle of Uniformity holds that the events of the future will resemble those of the past. That principle underpins the ...
Mark Andrews's user avatar
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Logical relations between reasons and behavior cannot be cause and effect?

I'm listening to this lecture on mental causation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RefjI1lGT-Q&t=1466s At 22:50, the lecturer says, "Hume told us didn't he that there can't be logical ...
Ameet Sharma's user avatar
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19 votes
16 answers
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Why is mind interacting with matter any more problematic than matter interacting with matter?

So there's this supposedly an 'interaction' problem for substance dualism, that isn't there for physicalism or idealism. I've never understood this. So as Hume pointed out, we see event a followed by ...
Ameet Sharma's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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Does Hume undermine determinism? [closed]

The problem of induction (kind courtesy David Hume) states that causality isn't deductively justified. Determinism, predicated on causality, isn't justified. Ergo, free will is (at the very least) ...
Hudjefa's user avatar
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Does Kant read the is/ought question in a way different from the "normal" reading?

First, to quote Hume: In every system of morality, which I have hitherto met with, I have always remarked, that the author proceeds for some time in the ordinary way of reasoning, and establishes the ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
269 views

Can Hume’s views on induction and on miracles be reconciled?

Here's a summary of his conclusion about induction. Thus not only our reason fails us in the discovery of the ultimate connexion of causes and effects, but even after experience has inform'd us of ...
Ludwig V's user avatar
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Does David Hume hold an opinion on the kinds of objects of causation?

I'm reading about causality in the Treatise of Human Nature by D. Hume but I can't seem to find out exactly what he considers objects to be when talking about causes and effects. At some points he ...
r0k1m's user avatar
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Has the “is-ought” problem finally met its match?

In the current online issue of Skeptic magazine, Gary Whittenberger publishes “Meta Ethics: Toward a Universal Ethics — How Science & Reason Can Give Us Objective Moral Truths Without God”. In the ...
Mark Andrews's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
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Is Hume talking about noumena in section 12 of the Enquiry?

So I'm almost done with the Enquiry and came across something in this section that reminded me of Kant's phenomena and noumena. If this is the case, I'm just curious, why hadn't anyone made this ...
R Samuel's user avatar
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An argument against Hume's idea of necessary connection

In section 7 of the Enquiry Hume talks about necessary connection being an ambiguous metaphysical concept since even though we see events happening one after another (ex. hitting a billiard ball ...
R Samuel's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
83 views

What does Hume mean when he relates association of ideas to languages?

In the Enquiry, section 3 Hume says: Among different languages, even where we cannot suspect the least connexion or communication, it is found, that the words, expressive of ideas, the most ...
R Samuel's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
174 views

What does Hume mean by metaphysics that fall under superstition?

Hey guys I'm reading Hume's 'An Enquiry concerning Human Understanding' and there's something I can't quite understand. Through sections I and II Hume talks about how he is trying to come up with the ...
R Samuel's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
56 views

Is/ought - do any philosophers say any claim of “is” is an ought already?

That there are no neutral claims involving “is” (or the verb to be) by our limited nature. I can see how this would solve a lot of problems, but not all the problems it may cause. Just wondering if ...
J Kusin's user avatar
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3 votes
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Is it logically coherent to imagine a person who has no prior conception of the world?

I'm working my way through An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding, and I've come to realize there's a specific problem I've had with several philosophers' writings: they tend to assume as part of ...
Slate's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
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Hume's Law and determinism?

So I've been reading on the is-ought distinction. Let's say I have a supercomputer and am given the initial conditions of an isolated system which contains humans. Then I see the time evolution of the ...
More Anonymous's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
225 views

Does this difficulty with philosophical enquiry compared with natural sciences still exist?

I've just started Hume's "A Treatise on Human Nature" and in the first chapter he speaks of a difficulty faced by philosophers, that physical scientists don't face. The problem being that ...
Zinn's user avatar
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3 answers
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The problem of induction and coherentism

My understanding of the problem of induction is this. You want to hypothesise that the future is like the past (let us call this hypothesis H), and so justify the scientific practice of making ...
UtilityMaximiser's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
479 views

Hume's induction using circularity fallacy

Hello everyone, i was going through this reading of a book in which it present Hume's induction wrong using circularity . I was trying to find some error in it as given there but could not pinpoint ...
John doe's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
81 views

Does volition provide any unique insight into causality?

According to Hume, we don't see a necessary connection between cause and effect. But I'm wondering if volition (moving our bodies) is something that is of a different character than causality we see ...
Ameet Sharma's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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Is there a Possible World in which Humeanism isn't true?

I'm an amateur philosopher, interested in the work of Ned Hall: Mindscape podcast: Ned Hall on Possible Worlds and the Laws of Nature (Dec-2019) PhilPapers: Humean Reductionism About Laws Of Nature (...
Anuj Manoj Shah's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
179 views

Questioning Kant's resolution to induction

From what I haved gathered from the first sections of the Critique, Kant wants to resolve the problem of induction by adding the a priori concept of (the necessity between) cause and effect to our ...
Joa's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
549 views

David Hume encouraged people to “burn” his works. Should we act like this? Why?

To find found out the reason behind Hume’s phrase (connected to his philosophy) and to express own opinion about it.
bbbbbbb's user avatar
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0 answers
56 views

Did David Hume ever express the concept of "compresence" personally?

In David Hume's "A Treatise of Human Nature", Hume introduces the concept of "bundle theory". Bundle theory is the idea that the identity of objects (or selves) is defined by ...
Guest999's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
832 views

Does Bayesian epistemology solve Hume’s problem of induction?

Or, does it just sidestep it? Or, is it just completely unrelated to it? I’m having trouble seeing what the connection might be. It seems to me that Bayesians solve it by saying, take: Your prior ...
Adam Sharpe's user avatar
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Hume's Law on the principle of explosion [closed]

The WikiPedia page of Hume's Law stated the following: An alternative definition of Hume's law is that "If P implies Q, and Q is moral, then P is moral". This interpretation-driven ...
CowNerd's user avatar
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0 answers
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What role does Hume's principle (HP) play in neo-logicism?

What role does Hume's principle (HP) play in neo-logicism? From what I understand Frege used Hume's principle in Freges theorem to create Peano axioms from HP by using second-order logic and that ...
ida's user avatar
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0 answers
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Does Hume's Fork have a third prong?

If so, does it have a name? I'm especially interested in search terms that I can use for further reading. In physics, we're familiar with the distinction between "relations of ideas" and &...
Jim Pivarski's user avatar
-2 votes
2 answers
308 views

Can "why-is" close the "is-ought" gap? [closed]

[UPDATE: Clarified that choosing what-ought-to-be from what-can-be is based on our knowledge of ourselves, not on our knowledge of good and evil] “I know you won't believe me, but the highest form of ...
Yuri Zavorotny's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
401 views

Is there any inconsistency in Berkeley's philosophy?

Does Berkeley's empiricist philosophy contain any inconsistencies? What are the inconsistent sides of Locke's or Hume's philosophies? How is Berkeley's world different from a Matrix-like world? The ...
Z. KM's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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Hume's law - misunderstanding?

I have always thought the main argument for/consequence of Hume's law is that just because something is in a certain way, that is not an argument for it to remain that way. E.g., just because ...
d-b's user avatar
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