Questions tagged [kant]

Immanuel Kant was a German Enlightenment philosopher.

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Given there are many relevant act descriptions, how can anyone obey the moral law?

we end up with either multiple maxims to test (and the possibility of conflicting results) or a single “relevant” maxim... [universalisability] should not be viewed as testing the actual maxims on ...
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How do I track down Kant reference AK 3:556

Trying to figure out how to understand references to the works of Kant. The context is from a translator introduction of Critique of Practical Reason that is referring to the Critique of Pure Reason. ...
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What did Kant mean when he said that phoronomically motion is subjective but dynamically objective?

Reference: Kant's footnote, 4:559-560, "General Remark to Phenomenology," Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science In logic the either-or always signifies a disjunctive judgment, where, ...
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What did Kant mean by "cognition" in the Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science?

"Every doctrine that is supposed to be a system, that is, a whole of cognition ordered according to principles, is called a science.". From second paragraph of the preface to the ...
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Is Conscious Awareness of Phenomenal Experience a Correlate of the Constitutive Activity of Kant's Reason?

In the introduction to Kant's Critique of Pure Reason by Marcus Weigelt, Weigelt writes, "Reason, although sometimes understood as the faculty that encompasses all thought (for instance when we ...
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Are Kant's arguments in the transcendentalist aesthetic circular?

"Space is not an empirical concept that has been drawn from outer experiences. For in order for certain sensations to be relatedd to some thing outside me, . . thus in order for me to represent ...
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Are Kant's arguments in the Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science meant to be synthetic a prori arguments?

The work is entitled Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science, and elsewhere, as in the Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals, Kant describe his metaphysics as the non-empirical element in the ...
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What is this passage from Proposition 4 of Kant's Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science saying?

In the following passage, Kant discusses the infinite divisibility of matter: Matter is impenetrable, through its original expansive force…But this is only a consequence of the repulsive forces of ...
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If Kant doesn't have the empirical world as a determinate whole, does this rule out a possible-worlds semantics for his modal logic?

For example, take actualist representationism: Kant's "whole world" doesn't seem to be a finished totality, so referring to "a maximal set of consistent propositions" seems amiss, ...
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Are transcendental and indispensability arguments reciprocally structured?

This question occurred to me in the course of addressing a recent question about what counts as evidence in philosophy. There, I offered that transcendental arguments are structurally akin to ...
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What does "giving rule to art" means?

"Genius is the talent that gives the rule to art", says Kant, what does "giving rule to art" means?
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Are noumena and phenomena relativistic concepts?

God , soul can be considered noumena , existing as thing in itself ,and while what we perceive through six senses can be called phenomena. However I can say that what we perceive through six senses is ...
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Does Kant anywhere address a possible argument for immateriality of soul from pure concepts?

Pure concepts which are recognized by Kant for their epistemological functions may themselves serve an argument for immateriality of the soul. The argument can look like this Pure concepts don't ...
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Why does the fact that moral laws or universal maxims are pure truths of reason imply they are the right or moral thing to do for Kant?

The question is based on an explanation from https://iep.utm.edu/kantview/ which states that what you should do, for Kant, is to "act rationally, in accordance with a universal moral law." ...
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Kant on paralogism of pure reason

In the following passage, I am not sure if I understand Kant. I do not cognize any object merely by the fact that I think, but rather I can cognize any object only by determining a given intuition ...
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Is God a noumenon? And why?

Is God a noumenon and why God is considered a noumenon? If I have personally experienced God then is it a noumenon or phenomenon from my point of view ?
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Is the law “matter attracts matter” a noumenon?

There is a law of gravity and it can be expressed as "matter attracts matter". Whether it is the matter of earth or sun or stars or atoms or dark matter etc , the law always holds. My ...
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Self-duality (in category theory) and advaita (non-duality in metaphysics)

In category theory, there are self-dual objects, where A ≅ A∗ (A is isomorphic to its dual), with the strict, but possibly non-coherent, case being when A equals A∗ (see Selinger[??]). In some ...
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How can I be proved wrong if I say “There are no noumena?”

Suppose I say, "There are no noumena." How can I be proved wrong without any doubt?
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If the finite-indefinite-infinite distinction is not exhaustive, does this affect Kant's resolution of the antinomies?

From the modern point of view, infinity comes not only in various flavors (some of which Kant seems to have been aware of), but various sizes. So when Kant talks about conceptions as being too small ...
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Kant's analysis of self-consciousness in CPR

I am fairly familiar with the general scheme of Kant's philosophy. I started reading Critique of Pure Reason since a few weeks ago. I think I understood nearly all parts (but I maybe mistaken) but now ...
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What is Kant's opinion on gossip?

Just curious this evening what Kant and other, contemporary, deontologists say about gossip. I don't mean deliberate lies, but a certain attitude to truth and truth telling in which both the ...
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Why does Immanuel Kant never doubt the existence of matter and external world themselves?

Why does Immanuel Kant never doubt the existence of matter and external world themselves? Does he presuppose their existence? If so, why? What I mean to ask is according to Immanuel Kant if we know ...
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Is the compound statement "Every bachelor is a man without a wife AND the Earth revolves around the Sun,” synthetic or analytic?

Is the compound statement "every bachelor is a man without a wife and the Earth revolves around the Sun” (where "and" is a conjunction) synthetic or analytic? Kant, for example, talks ...
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Is there at least one essay focused on Kant's definition of "notions" as intermediary between idea(l)s and conceptions?

I tried Googling "Kant 'notions'" but that doesn't seem efficient (from the results I've gotten). I assume that he appealed to the word for its being originally cognate with noesis and the ...
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Does Kant think we have an imperfect duty to not take intoxicants?

I want to smoke a cigarette to feel better. I want to smoke opium to feel better. I think we can ignore the consequences of everyone performing this action (in similar situations), mass addiction and ...
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What dictates how we phrase a maxim of a situation?

Can Kantian Maxims have more than one goal? Suppose I tell the murderer at the door that my mother is not home in order to save her life. That itself may be fine, but equally I am saying that in order ...
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According to Kant, are bad consequences of permitted actions imputable to the agent?

According to Kant, can permitted actions have culpable consequences? bad consequences are not imputable to the agent who acts dutifully Does that mean bad consequences are not "imputable" ...
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For Kant, how can we have moral autonomy if there's just one correct moral law?

What else then can freedom of the will be but autonomy, that is, the property of the will to be a law to itself? Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals So that in a nutshell is autonomy and freedom ...
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Kant's "interpret them as divine commands" remark

I was thinking about the idea of teleological/natural-law ethics as founded in the will of a divine power, and I thought that there would be (A) a purpose that this power had set for Itself alongside (...
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Does the Transcendental Dialectic destroy science?

Long story short, probably the most remarkable contribution of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason is the notion that the subject plays an important role on the definition of the object. However, if the ...
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Are there any well-grounded moral systems that can't be manipulated to justify whatever decision its acceptant wishes?

In §26 of A Theory of Justice (1999 ed.), Rawls writes: A problem of choice is well-defined only if the alternatives are suitably restricted by natural laws and other constraints, and those deciding ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
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Can there be such a thing as pure a priori thinking?

Having read Kant's Critique of Pure Reason, and in fact just finishing a second read after some time, I've been trying to develop a suitable "worldview" about the structure of the mind. I ...
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Kant and ontological character of the mind

I have a basic understanding of Kant's philosophy which revolves mostly around how human mind synthesizes valid knowledge, that is, the forms of understanding unifying perceptions, and forms of ...
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Kant's remarks about the concept of time and the principle of noncontradiction

In the Transcendental Aesthetic he notes: ... I shall add that the conception of change, and with it the conception of motion, as change of place, is possible only through and in the representation ...
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Kant and "the causes of living"

Once upon a time, I was thinking about the argument for the justification of mass civilian killing that is read off a sense of collective responsibility in "evil nations," and wondered: If ...
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What would it mean for time not to be real?

According to Kant, time is a pure intuition, meaning (in part) that its existence depends on the nature of human cognition. According to this doctrine, Other beings could in principle not experience ...
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To what extent is Nietzsche an "Idealist?"

I am well aware of Nietzsche's prolonged and often prolific critiques of what he referred to as "Idealism," yet I am curious as to the extent which two of his ideas in particular, namely ...
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Does "ought-implies-can" have to be taken for a universal material implication?

I was thinking of Quine's "change the logic, change the subject," saying, and thought over "change the deontic logic, change the deontic subject," and so then I wondered if deontic ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
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Categories of the Understanding

Kant's categories are supposed to tell us what kinds of judgments human minds are capable of making, but they are rather artificial. One commentator I've read says Kant was more concerned with filling ...
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Matter and form vs. noumena and phenomena

Aristotle says that the objects of experience are made up of matter which has taken up a form. This can be understood in a fairly unremarkable sense: in a statue of Aphrodite, the matter is marble, ...
David Gudeman's user avatar
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Problems with saying that our universe is physically closed (reformulating Kant's antinomies)

Initial caveat: some misapprehension seems to have arisen over my reference to physical sets. But in this, I am trying to follow the language of modern topology, which seems to be applied everywhere ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
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How is it Kant's view that lying is always wrong consistent with his view that killing in self-defense is permissable?

In his essay, "On the Supposed Right to Lie Because of Philanthropic Concerns" Kant seems to be arguing that lying is always wrong, even if it could save someone's life from a murderer. He ...
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Kant's commentary on the faculty of judgment: did he anticipate things like incompleteness/halting/truth-undefinability?

First, to cite the (Meiklejohn) version of the argument: If understanding in general be defined as the faculty of laws or rules, the faculty of judgement may be termed the faculty of subsumption ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
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Did Kant believe that the a priori truths don't coincide with the necessary truths?

I just started to read about Kant's metaphysical distinction between analytic vs synthetic truths (necessary vs contingent) and his epistemological distinction between a priori vs a posteriori truths. ...
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Is there a preferred reading order for Kant's ethics?

I have followed a course on theoretical as well as on practical philosophy, so I feel at least somewhat familiar with Kant's metaphysical project. I am primarily interested in his ethics. I've read ...
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Is Kant's talk of "homogeneity" the deeper point-of-contact between his theory of categories, and modern category theory?

The SEP article on category theory says: Categories, functors, natural transformations, limits and colimits appeared almost out of nowhere in a paper by Eilenberg & Mac Lane (1945) entitled “...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
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Is Kantian ethics silent on most complex moral questions?

The examples Kant gives for the application of the CI (categorical imperative) are relatively simple and unproblematic. Of course, it's contentious to regard lying for the greater good as immoral, but ...
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What is the morality of offending with uncomfortable truths?

Say the child of an ultra conservative father is homosexual, has kept it quiet for years but is quite sure that their father finding out would cause severe amounts of shame and anxiety that he might ...
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What did Kant mean by "pure physics"?

Early in the Prolegomena, Kant says that both pure mathematics and pure physics are examples of a priori cognition. What exactly did he mean by "pure physics"?
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