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Questions tagged [kant]

Immanuel Kant was a German Enlightenment philosopher.

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Does Kant implicitly commit the paralogism of pure reason when saying that to have a representation it is necessary to accom­pany it with 'I think'?

In Caygill's Kant Dictionary entry of 'I Think' there is this part: Kant further claims that 'I think' is the necessary vehicle/form/accom­paniment of experience: to have a representation it is ...
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Per Kant's theory of radical evil/religion, is belief in individual saviors the result of a corrupt subconscious process?

Early enough on in the Religion, he does say: Now there appeared at a certain time among these very people, when they were feeling in full measure all the ills of an hierarchical constitution, and ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
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Why does Kant refer to Hume's Enquiry as "otherwise uninstructive" in the Critique of Practical Reason?

The Critique of Practical Reason,5:14, seems to damn Hume with faint praise, acknowledging his service for initiating a critique of pure reason but being otherwise uninstructive. Was it in the ...
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Does Kant anywhere "rationalize" noumena on, say, moral grounds?

I ask in the context of reading various "new realists" or "objective oriented ontologists”. To my reading, many of these thinkers would like to return to Kant's attempt to unify both ...
Nelson Alexander's user avatar
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What did Kant mean when he said that phoronomically motion is subjective but dynamically objective?

Reference: Kant's footnote, 4:559-560, "General Remark to Phenomenology," Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science In logic the either-or always signifies a disjunctive judgment, where, ...
Gerry's user avatar
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Self-duality (in category theory) and advaita (non-duality in metaphysics)

In category theory, there are self-dual objects, where A ≅ A∗ (A is isomorphic to its dual), with the strict, but possibly non-coherent, case being when A equals A∗ (see Selinger[??]). In some ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
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If the finite-indefinite-infinite distinction is not exhaustive, does this affect Kant's resolution of the antinomies?

From the modern point of view, infinity comes not only in various flavors (some of which Kant seems to have been aware of), but various sizes. So when Kant talks about conceptions as being too small ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
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Kant's transcendental apperception and 'ipseity' in phenomenology

In the writings of various phenomenologists, the concept of 'ipseity' is widely discussed. As far as I can make out from various sources (e.g. Zahavi, Subjectivity and Selfhood, esp. chapter 5), ...
Bird's user avatar
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Confusion surrounding Kant's argument from geometry (Transcendental exposition of the concept of space)

In Max Muller's translation of the Critique of Pure Reason, Kant states, in "Transcendental exposition of the concept of space", that: Space must originally be an intuition; for from a mere ...
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How can Kantianism prove the existence of perfect duties?

I heard about Kant's reasoning that lying that you return money or about the leads to contradiction in conception. But how could he even prove that lying under any circumstances leads to ...
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is there any inconsistancy if i claim thing-in-itselmselves are giving our mind "causality"?

i'm simply testing this out the "problem of affection" in kant happens because kant says causality is an apriori knowledge can't we just say, thing-in-itself gives us "causality" ...
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Kant acknowledges physical needs as well as moral law, but has he adequately explained why one should win out over the other?

Theorem II, Book 1, of the Critique of Practical Reason acknowledges finite beings, as part of physical nature, and that they have desires and needs, specifically a need to be happy. But the Critique ...
Gerry's user avatar
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Kant and "the causes of living"

Once upon a time, I was thinking about the argument for the justification of mass civilian killing that is read off a sense of collective responsibility in "evil nations," and wondered: If ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
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Is Hume talking about noumena in section 12 of the Enquiry?

So I'm almost done with the Enquiry and came across something in this section that reminded me of Kant's phenomena and noumena. If this is the case, I'm just curious, why hadn't anyone made this ...
R Samuel's user avatar
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Cassirer and the Categorical Imperative

I've been reading some of the shorter works of the neo-Kantian and proto-semiologist Ernst Cassirer. While I find him a valuable bridge across the "continental divide," I'm not sure yet that ...
Nelson Alexander's user avatar
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What if the premise of CPR's Transcedental Deduction is wrong?

The transcendental unity of apperception is that unity through which all the manifold given in an intuition is united in a concept of the object. It is therefore entitled objective, and must be ...
Rajan Aggarwal's user avatar
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Is Kant committing the reflection fallacy? ( Kant's epistemology)

(1) I see a tree. (2) Therefore the tree is the object of my perception. (3) So I see the object of my perception. (4) Hence, without grasping the concept of object in general and subsuming the ...
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Are ideas in the prolegomena meant to be the failure of understanding?

In the third section of the Prolegomena, Kant explains in section 40 (at least how I understand it) that ideas are merely the analogues categories of those concepts that cannot be experienced. As I ...
J.M.W Turner's user avatar
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How Kant's second formulation of the categorical imperative interacts with consent

Kant's second formulation (or the "ends in themselves" formulation) says: use humanity, whether in your own person or in the person of any other, always at the same time as an end, never merely as ...
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For Kant, why is the Cogito an analytical proposition?

Could someone please explain to me why is that Kant thinks of the Cogito as an analytical proposition? Is it only because the predicate of the Cogito is already presumed in the concept of an thinking ...
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Is it the case that Kant was indirectly 'describing' the noumenon by defining phenomenon?

In all commentaries on Kant's philosophy and his Critique of Pure Reason, it is stated that noumenon is completely unknowable. For example in the entry of 'Appearance' in Encyclopaedia Britannica we ...
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Superiority of the concept as opposed to synthetic apperception

In The Foundations of Arithmetic (§ 48, p. 61), after maintaining that statements of numbers are indeed statements of fact, Frege asserts that: The concept has a power of collecting together far ...
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Account of Priori knowledge in Critique of Reason

As I understand, a priori statements are propositions that are conceived independently of one's experience. However, the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy states that The sensible world, or ...
mathnoob123's user avatar
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Question about the categories in the Critique of Pure Reason

For the past couple of weeks I have been reading Critique of Pure Reason by Immanuel Kant. Currently I am stuck at the chapter on transcendental deduction of the categories (Version B). So far my own ...
Misc's user avatar
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Is there a loophole in Kitcher's argument for the inadequacy of the law of association?

In Kant's Transcendental Psychology (hereafter, KTP), Patricia Kitcher gives an insightful argument for the inadequacy of the law of association, which she asserts was Hume's primary explanation for ...
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How does post-humanism deal with Kants Copernican turn?

Presumably as a term it decentres the human subject as inherited from Renaissance humanism; this continuing the Copernican revolution of decentring the human habitus. This suggests it bypasses Kants ...
Mozibur Ullah's user avatar
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What are Kant's critiques of Hume's and Descartes's conceptions of the self?

What are Kant's critiques of Descartes's conception of the self contained in the Metaphysical Meditations and of Hume's conception of the self expressed in the Essay concerning human understanding? ...
lalessandro's user avatar
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1 answer
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What is the role of the transcendental unity of apperception for the possibility of the perception of objects according to Kant?

Early in the B Deduction, Kant says: "The I think must be able to accompany all my representations; for otherwise something would be represented in me that could not be thought at all, which is as ...
danish's user avatar
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How does sensation contribute to empirical intuition and empirical concept?

I have been reading about Kant's theory of cognition in this article https://www.iep.utm.edu/kantmind/#SH2d. This is an extract that I have been trying to understand : "The genus is representation ...
erif tsalb's user avatar
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Kant's commentary on the faculty of judgment: did he anticipate things like incompleteness/halting/truth-undefinability?

First, to cite the (Meiklejohn) version of the argument: If understanding in general be defined as the faculty of laws or rules, the faculty of judgement may be termed the faculty of subsumption ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
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62 views

A concept of strong free will that's able to be represented in category theory?

Are there any such things as category theories where the category is an indeterminist/postdeterminist form of free will? Let's say, maybe it is a category where each object is an object of choice, ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
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Is Kant speaking "in his own voice" or more "synoptically" in the casuistical sections of the Doctrine of Virtue?

Sometimes Kant is said to have held antiquated or at least weird views (and worse, to be honest) about various subjects, including things like certain sexual activities or perhaps more bizarre ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
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65 views

What is the relationship between Kant's idea of the "transcendental grounds of experience" and his " transcendental theory of cognition"

So I understand the former as simply being what must be the case for experience to be possible (the a priori forms), yet I am not so sure of the latter. Does it simply mean that an object always has ...
rux23's user avatar
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1 answer
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Kant's intuition/concept distinction

I have a few interconnected questions related to Kant's terminology. I think I understand the basic idea of Kant's dichotomy between intuitions and concepts, but the details are very confusing. My ...
SihOASHoihd's user avatar
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339 views

What is the philosophical position that a metaphysical debate is caused by different mental models?

I'm looking for authors, papers, and hopefully, the name of the philosophical position that I describe here. I've seen a couple of papers so I know that they exist, but I can't recall the authors or ...
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Animal commodification

Is it morally or ethically justified to commodify animals (i.e., such as the tiger temple when it was a thing)? Should humans treat animals' ends (telos) with as much respect as we do ourselves? ...
Sam F's user avatar
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Kant, suicide, and the unalienable right to life

Recently, after taking an introductory course in Kantian ethics — I am now familiar with the concepts of free will, duty-conception, the categorical imperative —, I was writing an essay on his ...
user265131's user avatar
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How would Kant/Mill justify causing somebody discomfort when doing the righteous thing?

I was wondering how Kant, or even Mill might respond to the issue that when doing the righteous thing, say standing up for yourself against a bully, or somebody who wants to impede on your rights, you ...
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Can the analytic/synthetic distinction be accounted for as an erotetic difference?

Although Kant was the first to refer to the distinction as such, his belief that there is a form of truth based on predicates-contained-in-subjects actually goes back at least to one definition from ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
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181 views

How would Hume reply to Kant saying there are synthetic a priori propositions?

In my intro to philosophy class, our teacher presented us with "Kant's revolutionary thesis": There are synthetic a priori propositions. They must be [necessarily are] true without appealing to ...
Noah's user avatar
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The synthetic apriority of the categorical imperative

Weirdness I noticed about Kant's theory of the categorical imperative: he says that the CI is "synthetic," in the second Critique using the very imposing phrase "sic volo, sic jubeo" to characterize ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
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How does Kant solve the problem of the difference between phenomenon and noumenon?

[I'm sorry for my incorrect English] Hello, I studied the Critique of Judgment of Immanule Kant, and I don't understand, how Kant solve the problem of the difference between Critique of Pure Reason ...
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Schopenauer's critique of Kant: the distinction between knowledge of perception from abstract knowledge

I am reading "The World as Will and Representation" by Arthur Schopenhauer (Norman, J., Welchman, A., & Janaway, C. (Eds.). (2010). Schopenhauer: 'The World as Will and Representation'). In the ...
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Would the opacity of everyday motivations seriously undermine Kantian CI?

Would the opacity of everyday motivations seriously undermine Kantian categorical imperative (CI)? I tend not to use the CI when deciding what is moral, and partly because I'm not sure I know what my ...
user's user avatar
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Does the idea of psychological egoism about only dignity make sense?

I understand that psychological egoism is the idea that everyone will always act in their own interest. I gather that human dignity is the cornerstone of Kantian ethics. I am kinda seriously leaning ...
anon's user avatar
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Are Kant and Berkeley in closer philosophical relation than Kant wanted to believe?

Kant called Berkeley a "material idealist" on the grounds that Berkeley stated you are not and cannot experience objects outside a mind because the mind wouldn't understand what that means. Kant ...
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460 views

What's the relationship between good will and duty?

I'm writing an essay about the relationship between good will and duty, using an excerpt from Immanuel Kant's "Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals". I find the subject very interesting, but I'm ...
Veronika Roth's user avatar
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How to harmonise Empedocles theory of perception

In White Mythologies, in part a disquisition on poetics, Derrida quotes Du Marsais on metaphor: When we speak of the light of the mind, the word light is to be taken metaphorically; for just as light ...
Mozibur Ullah's user avatar
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1 answer
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Kant's definition of the imagination, B151

In paragraph B151 of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason (CPR), he defines the imagination as follows: Imagination is the faculty for representing an object even without its presence in intuition. ...
nickodel's user avatar
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1 answer
243 views

How do Kantian's respond to the "Neglected Alternative"?

In his Critique of Pure Reason, Kant posits two seemingly contradictory claims: The nature of Things in Themselves, as they exist apart from the phenomenal world, are unknowable. Time and Space do ...
Charlie's user avatar
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