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3 votes
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Can meaning is use be the conclusion of an inductive argument?

I think anyone can deduce many things from and about how we use language (if I know you are a bachelor and the meaning of the word, then I know that you are not married), but can we (get outside our ...
andrós's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
45 views

The logic of facts

The possibility of propositions is based upon the principle of the representation of objects by signs. My fundamental thought is that the “logical constants” do not represent. That the logic of the ...
Егор Галыкин's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
58 views

Wittgenstein and the primary elements

What does it mean to say that we can attribute neither being nor non-being to the elements? One might say: if everything that we call “being” and “non-being” consists in the obtaining and non-...
Егор Галыкин's user avatar
18 votes
9 answers
6k views

Does the success of AI (Large Language Models) support Wittgenstein's position that "meaning is use"?

By 'success' we think of current AI/LLMs capacity of producing text that is regarded as coherent, informative, even convincing, by human readers [see for instance Spitale et al. and Salvi et al.] ...
ac15's user avatar
  • 1,786
4 votes
3 answers
624 views

Wittgenstein and tautology

What does it mean to say that we can attribute neither being nor non-being to the elements? One might say: if everything that we call “being” and “non-being” consists in the obtaining and non-...
Егор Галыкин's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
89 views

Wittgenstein's chess example

When one shows someone the king in chess and says “This is the king”, one does not thereby explain to him the use of this piece a unless he already knows the rules of the game except for this last ...
Егор Галыкин's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
55 views

Can every idea including mathematical ideas be reduced to a series of simpler idea without information loss?

Can every idea including mathematical ideas be reduced to a series of simpler idea without information loss? You would naturally think this is the case since most ideas could be explained using a ...
Sayaman's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
82 views

Is the failure of substitutivity in an intensional context simply due to a lack of clarity in terms of the identity operator?

The oft-given example to demonstrate the failure of substitutivity in an intensional context goes as follows: (P1) Lois Lane believes Superman can fly (P2) Superman is Clark Kent (C) Lois Lane ...
Max Maxman's user avatar
5 votes
3 answers
98 views

Exploring Methods for Articulating the Ineffable Nature of Emotions: Philosophical Insights Needed

In the realm of human experience, both emotions and colors possess an ineffable quality, challenging our ability to fully articulate them through language. This resemblance highlights a fundamental ...
Armaan Sood's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
108 views

Statements about emotions

I have a quote from Ayer's "Language, truth and logic": If now I generalize my previous statement and say, ‘Stealing money is wrong,’ I produce a sentence which has no factual meaning – ...
Егор Галыкин's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
81 views

Ayer's denying of synthetic ostensive propositions

Let us suppose that I assert the proposition ‘This is white’, and my words are taken to refer, not, as they normally would, to some material thing, but to a sense-content. Then what I am saying about ...
Егор Галыкин's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
49 views

How do Philosophy students deal with archaic and old English in Philosophy books?

I am from India and English is my third language. When I tried to get into Philosophy, the first book I picked up was Meditations by Marcus Aurelius. Even though I liked the book, the archaic grammar ...
Suradoe Uchiha's user avatar
16 votes
5 answers
5k views

Is there a name for the argumentative tactic where you play dumb and ask for extreme simplification?

My day job is research in economics. In economics seminar culture, a common way to demolish the speaker is to play dumb and say "I don't understand what you are saying", implying that the ...
kmf's user avatar
  • 169
3 votes
3 answers
146 views

Factual and linguistic propositions

This is from "Language, truth and logic": A good example of linguistically necessary proposition which appears to be a record of empirical fact is the proposition, ‘Relations are not ...
Егор Галыкин's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
122 views

Do all theories require frameworks or assumptions to make? if so, why?

In philosophy class, particularly in epistenology, professors seem to have the assumption that to conceive of the concept of anything at all, including even this sentence now requires we have ...
Gerald Robertson's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
50 views

Understanding the difference between subject and object [closed]

Sometimes, the subject is an active thing. In the sentence, "He loves her," the subject of the sentence is active. Other times, the subject is a passive thing. In the sentence "He is ...
Fomalhaut's user avatar
  • 619
0 votes
2 answers
89 views

Does position imply existence? [closed]

People in that room don't exist. Is it contradictory because "people in that room" mean the people exist? Does "in the room", "in the school", etc all imply the existence?...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
130 views

On the linguistics of math affected by freewill?

After thinking more about: Daniel Dennett's concept of free will as an equation of state? I am super confused about the linguistics concerning mathematics. For example, "take the limit of x ...
More Anonymous's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
277 views

Is it possible for words to have a meaning other than how they are used?

Wittgenstein's language game concept holds that the meaning of a word can only be derived from its usage. However, some philosophers contend that some words have meanings other than that implied by ...
Meanach's user avatar
  • 2,385
1 vote
3 answers
699 views

Can location be assigned to an entity, given a lack of length, depth, or width?

If one is to postulate an entity that has a complete or absolute lack of height, depth, and width, can such an entity be located anywhere? Or does attribution of location to an entity entail length, ...
Max Maxman's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
54 views

How do we describe the objects or systems like an "organic meal"? [closed]

For a meal to be organic all the ingredients need to be organic, if one item isn't then technically the meal isn't organic. The same could be said about a vegan meal. I'm looking for a word to ...
ThomasReggi's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
176 views

What is Kant's opinion on gossip?

Just curious this evening what Kant and other, contemporary, deontologists say about gossip. I don't mean deliberate lies, but a certain attitude to truth and truth telling in which both the ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
93 views

Does natural language like English make more assumption about logic than mathematics?

Does natural language like English make more assumption about logic than mathematics? In mathematics, there doesn't seem to be any assumption made about which logic system is true, and therefore it is ...
Sayaman's user avatar
  • 4,187
0 votes
4 answers
170 views

Can any statement at all be logically impossible given that it depends on its meaning?

I am having trouble understanding the notion of logically possible or impossible when it comes to concepts given that all concepts (including mathematics) require a form of language. For example, we ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
63 views

Going against the limits of language

I vaguely remember a sentence of Wittgenstein which was about the duty of philosophy: that is, to go against the limits of the language. This was in his late period of philosophy. What is the precise ...
Gergely's user avatar
  • 117
3 votes
2 answers
163 views

Language, Meaning and Cardinality?

So I have been pondering about language. By language L I just mean a series of symbols. The upper limit of this series of symbols is Aleph-zero. Yet somehow using these symbols the human is able to ...
More Anonymous's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
51 views

A restriction on an action-language

Suppose that it is possible to "construct" a language where individual virtuous actions can make a referential contribution, sequentially in concerto, so that different patterns are ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
22 views

Analogical reasoning without language

Can we performs analogical reasoning without language, and if so does that say anything about us? I think so: comparing the feeling in our gut from eating bad food to life at sea. Is that analogical ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
88 views

How would a logician define the phrase "all other things being the same"?

Here are some Examples of the Phrase All other things Being the Same All other things being the same, the juice of a Granny Smith Apple is more acidic than a the juice of a Red Delicious Apple. All ...
Toothpick Anemone's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
122 views

What is the standard of determining whether someone understanding the concept? [closed]

A typical example would be aphantasia, a group of people who can't imagine pictures in mind. That means they are unable to imagine concrete object like geometry and it's almost the only way to know ...
ploybius's user avatar
2 votes
5 answers
208 views

Can we reduce Wittgenstein's claims of human language being limited by some actual propositions about the limits of language?

Wittgenstein argued that there are limits to what language can do, and that our attempts to use language to describe the world can sometimes lead us into confusion and error. He believed that many ...
Sayaman's user avatar
  • 4,187
0 votes
1 answer
82 views

Who was the German philosopher who said that 'German' language is superior?

I can't remember exactly where I read it, but I think in a Chomsky's essay, book, or probably a video and remember saying something about a German philosopher who claimed that German language is ...
Tsutsu's user avatar
  • 101
-1 votes
1 answer
1k views

Can you be objectively offended?

Example: Person A is talking to person B and uses a phrase that B is offended by. Person A is unapologetic because they personally don't take offense to that phrase and feel taking offense to it is ...
jankinator's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
132 views

Can realism exist? Could somebody make “real-” into an ideology?

[Please bear in mind that I may use different definitions of terms here, than you might know, since I’m a layman/hobbyist. Suggesting other terms for those definitions, that are established in the ...
user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
194 views

Censorship: Why should a word be censored when it is being discussed?

Preamble When dealing with matters of such a sensitive nature, it seems sensible to begin with a clarifying statement to ensure the question is not mistakenly imbued with any malicious intent. Racism ...
Futilitarian's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
55 views

Can formal languages have verbs?

Perhaps stupid question but I ask nonetheless. The question: Can Formal languages have a concept of a verb? If never, why can't they? Context: In natural language, we have verbs to describe action. In ...
tryst with freedom's user avatar
5 votes
6 answers
1k views

What are the reasons some thoughts cannot be simplified, reduced to a simpler set or phrases?

What are the reasons some thoughts cannot be simplified, reduced to a simpler set or phrases? When reading Heidegger or Hegel, one wonders why those authors couldn't simplify their tangled web of ...
Sayaman's user avatar
  • 4,187
1 vote
1 answer
176 views

Difference between morals and morality

I was wondering whether there is any difference between the terms morals and morality. I have encountered these terms on this site, and wonder whether there is any difference. Thanks.
Joselin Jocklingson's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
87 views

Types of mathematical questions? [closed]

Are there any other kinds of mathematical questions people ask besides the following? Requests for results Requests for proofs/justification Requests for illustrations or other aids to the intuition ...
Noah J's user avatar
  • 117
0 votes
2 answers
251 views

Is human language system static or dynamic?

I mean, is human language in flux like everything exists in this world? It's actually argument of Heraclitus which says that everything is in flux or change but Language is fixed system so the faulty ...
Schnoz's user avatar
  • 57
0 votes
1 answer
29 views

Is it correct to say that "we did not assume that a or b is positive." is equivalent to "we did not assume that a and b are both positive"? [closed]

Given a is a real number. We did not assume that a is positive. For me, that sentence means either a is positive or a is not positive. But given a and b are real numbers. I read a sentence that &...
Stats Cruncher's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
36 views

In how far is language involved in the world of ideas? [closed]

Language is a means to express ideas or emotions. It sets them free from the world in which they roam, i.e. our brain between our ears, inside our skulls. It could work the other way too. Language ...
Gerald's user avatar
  • 181
-1 votes
1 answer
67 views

Future tense explanations?

Is it possible to explain in the future tense? For example, "there will be smoke" because "there will be fire"?
Richard Bamford's user avatar
4 votes
6 answers
308 views

How is it possible to explain a logical language through a natural one?

Suppose we are to learn a subject like mathematics, then for it's precision and rigor, the topics discussed are described in terms of theories of logic. Suppose a student wishes to learn mathematics, ...
tryst with freedom's user avatar
3 votes
4 answers
236 views

A statement that is always true, but not a tautology?

Given I hand in a manuscript and the comment of the reviewer would be "You did not take in consideration to potential influence of this variable" the reviewer would be correct. However, my ...
A4-paper's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
309 views

What's with philosophers and their use of quotation marks?

I'm reading Hofstadter and Quine at the same time and this is deep. An explanation: The logician's use of "quotations" in sentences like this one would suggest that a quoted phrase is ...
R. Burton's user avatar
  • 135
-3 votes
1 answer
138 views

Didn’t Turing simply expand the space of algorithmic problems?

Code breaking brings the realization that, for the other side to generate their code (used my multiple people, not a private language), there must be an “algorithm”. Jacquard machines, analog Pong, ...
J Kusin's user avatar
  • 2,786
1 vote
1 answer
94 views

Assumed Disagreement

Two people are talking. One makes a claim "These chips are stale". Other replies "C'mon, buddy, those chips are as stale as mummy wrappings from a Pharoah's tomb". Aside from ...
Javaneer's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
151 views

Is abstraction always mind-dependent?

Else said, are there any physical mind-independent objects which are abstractions of other ones? I’m using mind-independent and mind-dependent like Searle. Things like syntax, language, and ...
J Kusin's user avatar
  • 2,786
0 votes
1 answer
46 views

How understand abstraction when some cases can’t be abstracted?

Like the liar sentence “this sentence is false” is said not to be a proposition. So not all sentences can be abstracted into props. Can infinite sentences be abstracted into propositions. Can infinite ...
J Kusin's user avatar
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