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Questions tagged [linguistics]

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2answers
140 views

Is there a special language for expressing subjective idealism?

Subjective idealism is the monistic metaphysical doctrine that only minds and mental contents exist. It entails and is generally identified or associated with immaterialism, the doctrine that material ...
3
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1answer
65 views

Is there anything on early to mid Foucault and structuralism?

Is there anything on early to mid Foucault and structuralism? I've just started The Archeology of Knowledge, meant to be I think the bookend of his early writings, and he is going to some lengths to ...
0
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1answer
48 views

Genuine singular term vs. non genuine singular term

I am reading "The Varieties of Reference" by Gareth Evans and there is that term "genuine singular term". I know what a singular term is but when is it "genuine"? Does someone have an idea?
3
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2answers
108 views

Sentences and reality

Would sentences have meaning even if humans did not exist? For example, would "the earth is round" have meaning if humans did not exist? Would it be true?
2
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1answer
72 views

Implication in sentences

What implications do we get when we use the past tense? For example, if I say that when I was younger, I used to play football, does this imply that now I don't?
0
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1answer
76 views

Meaning vs. Significance [closed]

From: Philip Johnson-Laird BA PhD Psychology (UCL), Stuart Professor of Psychology Emeritus at Princeton. (Author isn't a logician.) How We Reason (1st edn 2008). p. 433. [Chapter 1] 9. ...
2
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3answers
113 views

What is the name of the phenomenon that a thing must be named in order to understand it?

The concept is popular in the media and philosophy that to understand a thing, one should have a name for it. In Star War it is widely known with "Named must your fear be before banish it you can", ...
-1
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1answer
79 views

What are some good introductory books to contemporary linguistics?

I'm a philosophy student and I was going through philosophy of language but I feel that I do not have yet the basis to be critic about what I am reading. I think about it as going through philosophy ...
1
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2answers
96 views

With knowledge of modern linguistics, how would Aristotle develop his categories today?

I know that there is big debate behind the organizational principle behind Aristotle's ten categories. But, if we assume that his categories actually reflect major linguistic characteristics, how ...
0
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2answers
50 views

Fourfold categories development in Aristotle.

According to J.L. Ackrill, a key to understand his fourfold classifications of things we must understand two different notions: "Being in something as a subject" "Being said of something as a ...
2
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1answer
62 views

How important are Frege works to an analytic philosopher?

Don't kill me. I know he is a big deal. But I am starting out in analytic philosophy and I am not quite sure how deep I should go in a first approach. Should I read all the context and other ...
3
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3answers
232 views

The Origin of Thought

What is the most fundamental form of thought? In Tibetan Buddhism, there is the concept of the Three Vajras, or The Three Doors, which are body, speech, and mind. The human mind can be said to think ...
4
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1answer
79 views

Linguistic philosophical distinction between 'believe in' & 'believe that'

Can someone explain the linguistic philosophical distinction between 'believe in' and 'believe that'? (HH Price came up with the initial idea of the two entities)
2
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2answers
103 views

Semantics - If a being does not have its definition

If a being does not have its definition, then it can also have its definition, then it would be different from itself. Are there two beings here? In order to be different, they must be different ...
2
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2answers
182 views

Semantic Values of Sentences

I'm after the proper method for constructing semantic values of whole sentences out of the semantic values of individual words. There are also a few individual words I'm curious about as well. If we ...
3
votes
1answer
144 views

How would Quine's theory of indeterminacy of translation apply to a young child learning their native language?

In Word and Object, Quine wrote about how we can never be sure as to what a word actually means in and translates into our own language if we were a linguist studying an un-contacted native tribal ...
2
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0answers
74 views

Are here (in *semiotics*) technical terms for, and treatments in philosophy of, the use of “transparent” symbols in *monochrome* communication? [closed]

Questions. (0) Is there (especially in the Semiotics literature) a technical term for, and are there technical philosophical writings on, the use of "transparent" symbols to convey meaning in ...
3
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1answer
218 views

Isomorphism vs homomorphism in the Tractatus' picture theory of language

People often mention that there is an isomorphic nature between language and the world in the Tractatus' conception of language. As far as I can see it, according to Wittgenstein (it's been a few ...
2
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2answers
406 views

Is there a name for a fallacy wherein it is assumed either someone is lying or their assertion is true?

I'm hoping to find a name already in somewhat common usage for a fallacy of the following form: A person claimed X. Therefore either X is true or the person is lying. I've seen this fallacy ...
6
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2answers
1k views

Have I got Saussure's distinction between the form and substance right?

I've read several texts on the topic but I'm still not sure whether I got the concept right. Saussure says that language is a form, not substance. I understand that as saying that language is closer ...
4
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1answer
154 views

References for the study of language

I'm looking for (not too difficult too read) references related to Semiotics Philosophy of Language Philosophy of Linguistics I mainly seek the understanding of ideas about the relation between ...
13
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1answer
698 views

Does Google's latest translation tool support Jerry Fodor's Language of Thought Hypothesis?

Google recently updated their translation tool so that it can now translate between language pairs that it hadn't seen before, something they're calling "zero-shot translation." See here for the full ...
8
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2answers
257 views

Is Compatibilism just a word game?

I understand compatibilism to mean that an action can be free if it is self-determined by the agent, even if it would have been impossible for the agent to choose any other action. Consider the ...
3
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3answers
3k views

What is the relation between Sense/Denotation and Intension/Extension

Some people seem to use the words Sense and Intension (but also Denotation and Extension) without any distinction. Are Sense and Denotation the same thing ? If not, how are they related ? As I ...
0
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1answer
225 views

Why does Brandom drink the Chomsky kool-aid?

From the "Inferential Man" interview at http://www.pitt.edu/~rbrandom/publist.html "Norms are binding only insofar as one has endorsed them and adopted them. For example, to take the coin in my ...
11
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7answers
6k views

Is mathematics a language?

Galileo gave the metaphor that the natural world is written in the language of mathematics, but is mathematics even a language?
5
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3answers
349 views

How do we understand and fix reference for scientific units of measure?

Saul Kripke provides us with a clear way of how we understand and use names in Naming and Necessity. While this solves the problem of how we attribute and understand proper names an interesting ...
13
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7answers
919 views

Is music just another language?

In this video (starting around 00:28:30) the interviewer, Bryan Magee, and Noam Chomsky discuss musical composition as a form of thinking without language. But it seems trivial to me that music is a ...
16
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5answers
3k views

How can one refute John Searle's “syntax is not semantics” argument against strong AI?

There are many refutations of John Searle's Chinese Room argument against Strong AI. But they seem to be addressing the structure of the thought experiment itself, as opposed to the underlying ...
2
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1answer
377 views

What responses have made to Kripke's criticism of the descriptivist theory of meaning?

Under the influence of Kripke's acute analysis, there has been a growing trend of modern essentialism, or in other words, the assertion that there are 'essential' descriptors (rigid designators) that '...
1
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2answers
586 views

Lacan seems to invert 'metaphor' and 'metonymy': why?

This good site claims Metonymy thus concerns the ways in which signifiers can be combined / linked in a single signifying chain ("horizontal" relations), whereas metaphor concerns the ways in ...
6
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1answer
322 views

Doubt about the relationships in the Semantic Triangle

I was reading the wiki on The Semantic TriangleWikipedia, but it is not as good, so I have few doubts: As I read on many places an example for the vertices could be (I may have written incorrectly): ...
7
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1answer
154 views

Was indeterminacy of linguistic meaning, as understood by Quine, anticipated by the Aristotelian-Thomistic tradition?

Quine held that the meaning of words was indeterminate. The reasons he holds this view all seem to have in common a certain aspect; the indeterminacy that occurs occurs within what might be called '...
6
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4answers
277 views

Could philosophy be top-down?

Could it be that, in the way that mathematics is based on set theory (at least the standard one) or another framework and is built bottom-up from that, philosophy starts from relationships between ...
2
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0answers
155 views

What is the difference between language of thought is innate(known as mentalese) and natural 'learned' language?

Language of thought theories generally fall into two categories. The first one is accept the innate, known as mentalese and the second one is which don't accept the innate, but the language of thought ...
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0answers
305 views

How do we understand Jerry Fodor's representational theory of mind (RTM)?

Representational theory of mind (RTM). Hypothesis that mental processes defined over the syntax of mental representations. The later is the hypothesis that propositional attitudes are relations ...
8
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3answers
4k views

Does Noam Chomsky reject Darwinian evolution?

Hilary Putnam claims on his blog that: I am well aware that both Chomsky and Fodor reject Darwinian evolution. Is his claim that Noam Chomsky rejects Darwinian evolution true, and if so, on what ...
5
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2answers
533 views

Fodor's language of thought

Fodor developed his idea of language of thought (representational account of propositional attitudes) from Brentano's ideas of intentionality. At the same time Daniel Dennett criticised the Fodor's ...
4
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3answers
188 views

Name of Formal Fallacy? Probability does not entail Certainty

Question 1: What is the name of the Formal Fallacy wherein a Deductive Conclusion is arrived at via the course of an Inductive Argument? Question 2: Also, is this fallacy considered a "Deductive ...
2
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2answers
125 views

Do linguists call human language “natural”? [closed]

From a recent question (Could a programming language be considered as a language?), it came to me the impression that there may be some confusion about the terminology professional linguists use, when ...
0
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2answers
207 views

What are the propositions?

I've asked before as to what propositions count as meaningful, and, as some commentators and responders helpfully pointed out, 'meaning' and 'propositions' appear to be identical entities in the ...
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2answers
394 views

What is meaningful?

Which propositions are considered meaningful and on what grounds? In other words, when is it correct to predicate 'meaningfulness' of the propositions?
1
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1answer
57 views

On act of asking

Consider the situation below: A boy asked his mom for a chocolate cake. His mom, however, gave him a lemon cake instead even though she had the chocolate cake. The boy enjoyed the lemon cake so much ...
0
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1answer
78 views

Do sentences that are “selection violations” have truth values?

Given a grammatical sentence like "Colorless green grass sleeps furiously" is it possible to assign a truth value to it?
4
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2answers
268 views

Current philosophy of language

I wanted to know what are the current status of philosophy of language. What is valid today? What philosophers are accepting? For example, during the beginning of the XX centry, we have Frege's views ...
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7answers
6k views

How can I develop my critical thinking skills?

I am a freshman engineering student going to college. I want to learn how to think critically and to become a critical thinker and a sharp arguer. I am interested in philosophy, because I am curious ...
6
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3answers
304 views

Can the oldest man in the world die?

In the news, I read "Recently, the oldest man in the world died." I know the intended meaning of the above sentence, but language wise it might be kind of a stretch. Is this a sentence where the ...
4
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0answers
161 views

Are all languages related? [closed]

This question was prompted by this newspaper article saying: Languages spoken by billions of people across Europe and Asia are descended from an ancient tongue uttered in southern Europe at the end ...
12
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2answers
277 views

How does language alter our experience of the world?

I was thinking — if we didn't have words our experiences would be different somehow. It seems to me that perhaps words are limiting our experiences because as soon as we relate an experience to a ...
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2answers
194 views

How do we know that grammar is a thing?

I mean, is there a thought experiment that shows its ontological validity? Could it concievably, based on the data that we have, be merely an epiphenomenon of syntax and semantics?