All Questions

Tagged with
Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
1
vote
1answer
83 views

What are the problems with Tractatus?

Tractatus, in a way, says World isn't what is out there, but is the world you imagine. World is what you would tell another person when you will recount this world. (It is what you would 'know' of the ...
1
vote
1answer
48 views

Mechanics of Perception

How is perception formed? By perception I mean 'thought' or 'idea' of the World. What I see by itself does not contribute anything to thought. Only an acknowledgement can contribute to structuring of ...
0
votes
4answers
139 views

Definition vs Logic

Logical consequence means that, if, P implies Q, then Q is True not because (or when) we interpret (or find) it to be True, but it is set to True as soon as P is set to True. This means that Q is ...
2
votes
2answers
99 views

Wittgenstein's solipsist, from Tractatus?

According to the early Wittgenstein of the Tractatus, the solipsist is one and one and the same with the world. He then makes the claim that solipsism coincides with realism. 5.64, Wittgenstein ...
2
votes
0answers
48 views

Using solipsism's incoherence with doubt as proof of the external world?

I have the following rough outline of utilizing solipsism as a proof by contradiction to the goal of asserting an epistemological proof of the external world. A solipsist (Wittgenstian) lives in a ...
1
vote
0answers
93 views

If logical propositions aren't tautologies (a la Wittgenstein), then what could they be?

This is a historical question about philosophical views. I believe I understand the claim made by Wittgenstein and others that logical propositions are tautologies. I'd like to know what other views ...
5
votes
2answers
236 views

What does Wittgenstein mean when he says “there are no numbers in logic”?

From the Tractatus: 5.453 All numbers in logic stand in need of justification. Or rather, it must become evident that there are no numbers in logic. There are no pre-eminent numbers. What does ...
1
vote
1answer
82 views

A Problem With Kripke's Rule-Following Paradox Example?

It seems that there is a problem with the example that Saul Kripke gives in "Wittgenstein on Rules and Private Language" to explain Wittgenstein's rule-following paradox. I'm not asking about the ...
1
vote
1answer
67 views

Is logic a consequence of structure of language i.e. syntax?

I was reading the paper An elucidatory reading of the Tractatus and in page-3 section- Ineffabilist Readings, it was written "The order in our propositions, which renders them capable of thus ...
2
votes
1answer
188 views

What is the subject of Tractatus by Wittgenstein?

Is Tractatus about the Philosophy of language or Philosophy of logic. I was hearing John Searle's lecture and he said there are two strands in Philosophy of language :- 1. Logical theory of language 2....
6
votes
1answer
1k views

Is Wittgenstein right when he criticises recursion theory in the Tractatus 3.333?

In a notorious text from the Tractatus 3.333 Wittgenstein argues that a function that has a value in one argument cannot be re-used in a another. Hence recursive functions are meaningless. This ...
4
votes
1answer
335 views

The nature of elementary propositions in the Tractatus

So all complex objects in the world are, at the most fundamental level, made up of simple un-analysable objects which are denoted by 'names'. Combinations of simple objects constitute 'states of ...
3
votes
1answer
350 views

Making 'sense' of Wittgenstein's senselessness / nonsense distinction in the Tractatus

For this question I'm just considering Wittgenstein's theory at the time of the Tractatus. As far as I know, for Wittgenstein: Meaning - The object denoted by a word (i.e. referent). Sense - The ...
2
votes
1answer
116 views

What is the meaning of these criticisms of Aristotelian logic?

I'm reading Ray Monk's biography of Wittgenstein and, on a scathing book review of Wittgenstein's, Monk writes, There follows a list of such mistakes, which are, for the most part the weaknesses ...
5
votes
1answer
275 views

Isomorphism vs homomorphism in the Tractatus' picture theory of language

People often mention that there is an isomorphic nature between language and the world in the Tractatus' conception of language. As far as I can see it, according to Wittgenstein (it's been a few ...
3
votes
2answers
318 views

How should I approach Wittgenstein's works?

I recently read Ray Monk's excellent biography of Wittgenstein, and would like to read something by the Austrian philosopher himself. It seems that you need to know a fair amount of logic to start ...
4
votes
1answer
387 views

What did Wittgenstein (mean to) achieve in the Tractatus?

I read the Tractatus about a decade ago, and was impressed, both by it and I suppose myself! But suddenly I'm seriously wondering what the book has or could achieve. Not so much how it changed ...
8
votes
1answer
269 views

What is Wittgenstein claiming when he says that “each thing can be the case or not the case while everything else remains the same”?

In Tractatus 1.21 Wittgenstein writes  Each item can be the case or not the case while everything else remains the same. [1] I'm looking for commentary on this point, since it seems out of place ...
4
votes
1answer
136 views

Which problem is Russell focusing on while providing a solution, in his introduction to the Tractatus?

In the final part of his introduction to the Tractatus Logico-philosophicus, Russell provides a possible solution to the problem of the impossibility of self-reference of logic: There is one ...
3
votes
1answer
119 views

Why may I considere Wittgenstein a Kantian thinker with regard to metaphysics?

Wittgenstein is a Kantian philosopher as far as the structure of the Tractatus, as far as the last part (section 6 and comments) are concerned with: that I cannot speak about the subject in the ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

Are propositions of sciences to be considered propositions of natural language, in the Tractatus?

Given the following assumptions: 1) When Wittgenstein speaks about meaningful propositions he does refer to propositions of natural sciences. 2) About the problem of the perfection of language, he ...
1
vote
1answer
220 views

can a vague sentence be considered meaningful in the Tractatus?

In the Tractatus, Wittgenstein draws a demarcation among meaningful sentences (1), the meaningless propositions of logic (2: sinnlos sätze) and nonsensical propositions (3: unsinnig sätze). 1) ...
2
votes
1answer
420 views

How Russell and Ramsey misunderstood Wittgenstein with regard to the problem of the perfection of language?

In the Tractatus Logico- Philosophicus there is a tension between the aim of achieving a language perfectly ordered, with regard to natural language, and the evidence that the latter is not really ...
1
vote
1answer
205 views

Which is the difference between Sache and Sachverhalt in the Tractatus?

As far as I know, When Russell asked to Wittgenstein to tell him the difference between Sache and Sachverhalt, Wittgenstein answered that "Sachverhalt" is what corresponds to an elementar sätze (an ...
1
vote
1answer
121 views

What does bedeutung refer to in the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus?

Given that the literal translation of the german word bedeutung is "sense", what does it refer to in the semantics of the tractarian Wittgenstein, among these options? the meaning of the subatomic ...
14
votes
2answers
1k views

Is “propositions of logic are tautologies” (Wittgenstein) literal or mystical?

At 6.1 in the Tractatus, Wittgenstein says, "The propositions of logic are tautologies." When he says this, is he referring to the fact that the axioms of propositional logic as presented, for ...
4
votes
4answers
288 views

In Wittgenstein, is all the facts being *all* the facts a fact itself?

Wittgenstein writes in his Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus (p.25 in this version): 1. The world is everything that is the case. 1.1 The world is the totality of facts, not of things. 1.11 The ...
5
votes
1answer
192 views

Is the Tractatus considered to have had any permanent influence on philosophy, given that Wittgenstein himself later repudiated it?

I was reading a text book that stated that Wittgenstein's Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus is rarely criticized in a serious way, since Wittgenstein himself rejected its ideas in his later phase, as ...
4
votes
1answer
118 views

Are Wittgenstein's propositions analytic or synthetic?

Wittgenstein provides a logical analysis of propositions in the Tractatus. Does he there admit the Kantian distinctions between analytic/synthetic and a priori/a posteriori divisions; or does his ...
0
votes
1answer
257 views

Did Wittgenstein say something about intuition for logic?

When one creates some logical content, like in programming, only naives think that this is a rational way of thinking. In fact, this is based on patterns and intuition. Did Wittgenstein say anything ...
0
votes
1answer
223 views

Can anyone correct my understanding of “a priori conception”

Not only in judgements, however, but even in conceptions, is an a priori origin manifest. For example, if we take away by degrees from our conceptions of a body all that can be referred to mere ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

Tractatus 3.333 and Russell's paradox

Can anyone explain to a non-logician how Tractatus 3.333 refutes (or fails to refute) Russell's Paradox? Please explain his use of symbols!
6
votes
4answers
411 views

Wittgenstein: Why is bipolarity necessary?

I do get that for a certain proposition there may be the possibility of it being either true or false, but why must this possibility exist for every proposition?
3
votes
2answers
923 views

Does Wittgensteins own solution to Russells Paradox actually work?

In the Tractatus, Wittgenstein attempts a solution of Russells paradox 3.333 A function cannot be its own argument, because the functional sign already contains the prototype of its own argument ...
4
votes
1answer
518 views

What is the logic in the Tractatus-Logico Philosophicus in modern terms?

In the SEP entry on Wittgenstein, the description of the logic utilised in the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus to describe his logical atomism appears to be at least formally classical propositional ...
-1
votes
1answer
194 views

Wittgenstein on algorithm decidability and Incompleteness Theorem [closed]

I found Internet resources a bit confusing, so I ask this question: What are Wittgenstein's arguments on algorithm decidability and Godel's Incompleteness Theorem?
13
votes
4answers
901 views

Does Wittgenstein's Tractatus establish serious bounds for discussions of the supernatural from a modern point of view?

In today's mathematics, we have many variants of logic (propositional, first order, higher order, fuzzy logic, etc.). These are all self-consistent formal systems that are based on some set of axioms. ...
18
votes
1answer
1k views

Should Wittgenstein be given some credit for Godel's incompleteness theorem?

Is there a connection between Wittgenstein's argument against the "Theory of Types" and the proof of Godel's Incompleteness Theorem? Being only semi-knowledgeable, I will draw the connection of which ...