Questions tagged [logic]

For questions about logic, whether it concerns syllogistic logic, mathematical logic or the nature of logic itself.

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How the hell could it be a valid argument if the premise and conclusion are two different things [closed]

The premise is: John is a married bachelor The Conclusion is: Pigs can fly There is only one premise and one conclusion. Why are they connected and in what way can we say this argument is valid?
Leoucl's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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Halting Problem Oracle

Halting problem is unsolvable. There is no method to solve it, so no human can solve it. So why is any theory utilising an oracle (which can solve halting problem) not simply nonsense?
Ajax's user avatar
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Is this a problem with verisimilitude talk, many-valued-logic talk, or something/nothing else?

A perhaps naive characterization of verisimilitude is "closeness to truth," the proximity coming from the similarity. At least, the SEP article uses, "The number of planets is 9," ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
78 views

Are there conjunctive facts and disjunctive facts?

Facts are supposed to be the grounds for truths. However, consider a conjunctive statement like "Paris is in France and New York City is in the USA". What fact grounds that? Is there such a ...
user107952's user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
342 views

Identity in Quantified Modal Logic

Why is ¬(◇(a=b)∧◇¬(a=b)) a validity in Quantified Modal Logic (QML)? For example, let a:=“the present King of France” and b:=“the richest bald person alive”. Then, it seems ◇(a=b)∧◇¬(a=b) is not a ...
PW_246's user avatar
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2 answers
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"This seems to abolish logic, but does not do so."

If language is to be a means of communication there must be agreement not only in definitions but also (queer as this may sound) in judgements. This seems to abolish logic, but does not do so. -- It ...
UtilityMaximiser's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
225 views

Why not everything has an end

Consider this statement: “Everything has an end” I think many of you here can agree with this. But that means that the claim in this above statement also has an end. So one day, there might be some ...
Kamal Saleh's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
100 views

How be so sure that implications are bivalent? (An attempt to resolve paradoxes of material implication)

The material conditional, P→Q defined as ¬P∨Q, is usually thought not to match the usual linguistics, as seen by many paradoxes. The Wikipedia article gives few good examples. I tried to resolve them ...
Dannyu NDos's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
396 views

What do you call this type of logic?

What do you call a logic that is a gradient between a gradient between two extremes and a single point. So, for simplicity, let’s say an upside-down triangle (▼)… In my case, specifically, the top ...
user avatar
2 votes
4 answers
494 views

How is scientific realism not an example of the fallacy of the converse?

Firstly, to be clear, I'm not trying to say that science is all nonsense or not useful or anything of the sort, since that's obviously not the case. If nothing else, it's incredibly useful for making ...
Mikayla Eckel Cifrese's user avatar
7 votes
9 answers
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Is desire closed under logical equivalence?

Suppose some person P desires a statement S to hold. Also, S is logically equivalent to S'. Does this mean that P desires S' also? Basically, is desire closed under logical equivalence?
user107952's user avatar
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Why do people speak as though "all" does not imply "some"? [closed]

Suppose someone asks whether some of the people in a classroom are over 20 years old, and then someone says, "No, all of the people are". Why would they say that? Why can't they say ...
user107952's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
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Natural Language and Implication

I understand that relevant logic deals with a natural-language interpretation of implication, but it seems too restrictive. It does seem a bit of a reach to say that there is a conceptual link between ...
PW_246's user avatar
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1 answer
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fitch-style proof C ∨ E , A ∨ M , A → ¬C , ¬S ∧ ¬M ⊢ E

I want to prove this statement using fitch-style : C ∨ E, A ∨ M, A → ¬C, ¬S ∧ ¬M ⊢ E This is what I have at the moment but I'm completely lost on what I should do next or if I've gone down the wrong ...
user65563's user avatar
4 votes
8 answers
8k views

Is this a fallacy: "A woman is an adult who identifies as female in gender"? [closed]

The phrase tries to avoid the overt circular definition found in the variant, "a woman is anyone who identifies as a woman", by swapping woman with female in gender. But is that still a ...
Eyeofpie's user avatar
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2 answers
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If a then it cannot fail to be the case that b

I am studying logic in my free time from the book Logic: A very short introduction by Grahan Priest and I am currently encountering difficulties in chapter 6 about Necessity and possibility. In this ...
eeqesri's user avatar
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4 answers
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Logic as an obstacle to knowledge

Has there been any philosopher making an argument along the lines that logic is an obstacle to knowledge about the world? The informal argument could go something like: logic is created by humans (...
Frank's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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Relativism and common sense in ZFC

ZFC is the most well known set theory which is considered by many as the foundation of mathematics but I am confused to understand it intuitively. Most of us have a clear understating of empty set and ...
Arian's user avatar
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1 answer
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Has this mathematically proven solipsism? [duplicate]

http://bc.upjp2.edu.pl/Content/5621/35_PDFsam_Ca%C5%82o%C5%9B%C4%87%20ze%20znakiem%20wodnym3.pdf It's not so much the math as it is these things in the link: More generally, there can be no deductive ...
DarkNeos's user avatar
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0 answers
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Would my argument of knowledge being a social construct be a resolution to The Problem of the Criterion?

Questions from https://iep.utm.edu/problem-of-the-criterion/: What do we know? How are we to decide in any particular case whether we have knowledge? I’ve been reading into The Problem of the ...
Dennis Francis Blewett's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
157 views

If an argument cannot be known as sound, can it still be claimed as sound?

I have read the the criteria to determine if an argument is sound is if its claim is valid and its premises are true. However, what if no one can know whether or not an argument is sound because no ...
Dennis Francis Blewett's user avatar
8 votes
4 answers
2k views

Is there a term for a fallacy in which one believes something to be divinely inspired due to being improbable?

Consider the following argument: I have been born on Earth, during a time of relative prosperity. The probability that I was born at this moment, of all moments, is very small. Therefore, this is ...
Micrified's user avatar
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2 answers
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Is there a logic of non-universal class characteristics?

The proposition (1) Dogs have four legs is true, but if you tried to convert this proposition into predicate logic, the only reasonable candidate is the false (2) for all x, x is a dog implies x ...
David Gudeman's user avatar
-1 votes
2 answers
55 views

Jurisprudence and logic: Is it a necessary criterion for a claim to be declared sound that there be no evidence to the contrary as to its soundness?

So, I've been generating various arguments (such as related to the synthesis of legal arguments), and I have been doing my best to figure out how to declare that a particular claim is not sound. For ...
Dennis Francis Blewett's user avatar
4 votes
4 answers
166 views

What truth value should be determined for statements that say something about something that has no meaning for it?

According to the principle of excluded middle, every statement is either true or false. It might sound a little ridiculous, but consider the following statement: Mountains believe in God. Believing ...
Just a homo sapiens's user avatar
5 votes
4 answers
2k views

What is the difference between a "question" and an "answer"?

All I was able to find through Google regarding the subject is from The Blind Spot, where it says, in part, The question at stake is the nature of mathematical knowledge and the difference between a ...
John Forkosh's user avatar
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0 answers
43 views

Can, "This problem is unsolvable," be used to formulate the first incompleteness theorem in erotetic logic specifically?

Assumptions/definitions: the Gödel sentence is informally equivalent to, "This sentence can't be proved in system X," where X is appropriately specified. Since that sentence can itself be ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
152 views

Is circular reasoning always wrong?

I was wondering if circular reasoning is always a problem I was thinking about something like this if A then B, And If B then A. Premise. A is true Conclusion. B is true. All this shows is that B ...
Firebirdofnercy's user avatar
1 vote
6 answers
202 views

Can circular reasoning be logical, and can it provide support for the Bible?

Circular reasoning is a type of logical fallacy where the premise is used to prove the conclusion. A basis example would be: This historical movie is creditable. Why? Because it says so. In this ...
Hannah's user avatar
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5 votes
7 answers
485 views

Is this the correct usage of "consensus"?

[See updated question below] I'm debating someone who is making this argument: "Most religions believe all other religions are wrong, and their religion is right. Therefore the consensus is that ...
thecloud_of_unknowing's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
117 views

From English Sentence to Symbolic Logic: "The Happiest Person is not named John"

Suppose that x is over the domain of all things and I have the following predicates: H(x) = x is a person, J(x) = x is named John, F(x,y) = x is happier than y, a = John Smith My interpretation of ...
gradual_gradient's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
210 views

What are examples of non classical formal logic being used to solve practical questions?

Algebraic logic is something which exists both in Mathematics and Philosophy. However, I've been feeling discontent with the number of examples presented of using logic to solve work through ...
tryst with freedom's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
75 views

Would a "disagreement operator" break down if iterated too much?

Let D(S) read as, "I disagree that S." It is possible to iterate this, so that DD(S), "I disagree that I disagree that S." Then we can go on to DDD(S), and so on. (For a peer-...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
289 views

Fundamental equations in Philosophy and Logic

For the natural sciences it is easy to indicate the most important fundamental equations. If I want to explain Philosophy and Logic to a physicist or a chemist, what are considered the most important ...
Arunabh Bhattacharya's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
72 views

Do models of Cartesian closed logic physically exist?

Cartesian closed logics, also known as simple type theories or simply-typed lambda calculi, are ubiquitous; we use sentential logic (WP, nLab) all the time in philosophy and law, and doxastic logic to ...
Corbin's user avatar
  • 633
3 votes
2 answers
281 views

The massive problem with regarding string manipulations as the foundation of mathematics

Formalists believe that mathematics is just a game of string manipulation, not much different from other games like Ludo or chess. I think string manipulation is an extremely useful way to think about ...
Ryder Rude's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
40 views

Question regarding the stipulated 'domain of discourse' for models of first-order sentences

Assume 'S' is a first-order sentence about a subject 'Z'. When one stipulates a Model for 'S' with a domain 'D' does one always assume that the domain will contain all the objects within the subject '...
help-me's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
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Intuitionism, the law of excluded middle and mental construct

I don't get why LEM is rejected in intuitionistic logic. The basic idea behind intuitionism is that math is a mental construct. But how does this make LEM not acceptable? I've seen some similar posts ...
Irene's user avatar
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1 vote
4 answers
159 views

How does one test their credences of belief?

Suppose I feel that event A is more plausible than event B. How can I test, verify, or falsify this? For example, suppose I have a belief that my partner is cheating on me. Suppose I have another ...
thinkingman's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
158 views

How does logic deal with objects that change?

Say I have an object that is currently red, but in one day will be painted green. If I put it in my formal language with a constant symbol 's' and define the colours green and red using 'g' and 'r' ...
Confused's user avatar
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6 votes
10 answers
3k views

How can we prove that the supernatural or paranormal doesn't exist?

Agnostic theists and atheists believe themselves to be hopelessly ignorant concerning the existence of the supernatural or paranormal. To them, gnostic atheism isn't adequately supported by evidence, ...
ActualCry's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
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An introductory book on philosophy of language and logic?

I tried self teaching philosophy of language, logic, modal logic but I am lost as a headless chicken. Can anyone help me please? I have a full time job, but I can take an hour everyday and learn a bit....
Anaamika's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
60 views

Books similar in nature to Logic and Theism by Jordan Sobel?

I've recently been reading "Logic and Theism" by Jordan Sobel and have found it to be fascinating. The two primary things I like about it are: The book primarily focuses on analyzing the ...
debord's user avatar
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5 votes
5 answers
919 views

Logic of hypothesis testing

The logic of hypothesis testing is this: State the hypothesis (called the null hypothesis) Get some data If the data is very unlikely under the assumption that null hypothesis is true then conclude ...
Sanyo Mn's user avatar
  • 159
2 votes
0 answers
39 views

Bias type based on achievement of goals

What type of bias is it if I favour an idea because the implementation of the idea will benefit me? Example: I favour limited gun control despite reading contrary arguments because my livelihood is ...
Al Germain's user avatar
5 votes
3 answers
3k views

Why was intuitionist logic abandoned?

I have seen many questions discussing intuitionist logic (Brouwer, Weyl etc.) on the site. However, this whole area of logic seems to be dead, and it also looks like philosophers / mathematicians / ...
Dennis Kozevnikoff's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
36 views

Reference request : Defining concepts

Shafi Goldwasser's interview In the video attached, Goldwasser talks about course(s) on abstract subject matter like definition of concepts, definienda, etc. I am looking for a link to course/book ...
Ajax's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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Does a definite description such as "the train" or "the student" always signal uniqueness of the referent?

Some authors claims that a definite description such as "the king" does not necessarily signal uniqueness. Examples given: (1) I’ve got this data from the student of a linguist. — Poesio (...
Speakpigeon's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
168 views

What is ⊥ called in paraconsistent logic?

I am building a weakened version of the intuitionistic logic. It wouldn't satisfy (p∧¬p)→⊥ as a tautology, but rather, (⊤→(p∧¬p))→⊥. In plain English, contradictions admit no proof, but there might ...
Dannyu NDos's user avatar
-2 votes
2 answers
76 views

In FOL are all functions also relations?

In standard mathematics binary relations are treated as an expansion on the concept of the function, and as such we get into a difficult situation where 'xFy' could be the application of f on to x and ...
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