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Questions tagged [natural-law]

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Which are or were those ideas considered "natural rights"?

Before the appearence of the idea of "human rights" after the second world war (though some says not the term but a similar term and a similar idea, "rights of the man" appeared ...
Pablo's user avatar
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Why is it that the precedent of breaking a bad law might weaken the force, and lead to discretionary violation of those which are good?

It's an opinion expressed by Thomas Paine in his book 'Rights of Man'.
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Does Thomas Hobbes assert that political philosophy or civic philosophy as it was known then, began with him?

I found this claim that Hobbes believed he founded political philosophy in multiple reputed places. In this lecture from Yale: 12. The Sovereign State: Hobbes' Leviathan In Leo Strauss and Joseph ...
Ash Rivers's user avatar
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Is the doctrine of modern Human Rights considered to be supreme form of Ethics by modern philosophers?

I am from a suburban place in India and honestly, people usually look towards common sense, combined with some Hindu Ethics to live their lives here. Pretty much nobody knows or cares about Human ...
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Are natural rights embedded in essentialism?

Natural rights are the idea in which human beings are owners of certain rights by nature, by the fact that they are born humans. That being said, one should be able to determine whether something is ...
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IS history inductive or abductive reasoning?

We collect data or events from past in history. IS it inductive or abductive reasoning ? In many books (eg. 48 laws of power by Robert Greene) and many other books people state laws by citing events ...
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Is the very origin of the “natural law” religious or philosophical?

Is the very origin of the “natural law” religious or philosophical? Definition (Wikipedia): Natural law[1] (Latin: ius naturale, lex naturalis) is a system of law based on a close observation of ...
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Does the Universe tend towards complexity/elegance?

So many of our scientific theories suggest that, from singularity or homogeneity, everything grows more and more complex. I say 'so many' here because I'm not speaking only about cosmology (and ...
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For St. Thomas Aquinas, is speaking what is true with the intent to deceive a immoral?

For Saint Thomas Aquinas, the essence of lying (lying is always immoral for him) has nothing to do with the intention to deceive (Summa Theologica II-II q. 110 a. 1 co.): Accordingly if these three ...
Guilherme de Souza's user avatar
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What is the relation between naturalism and the natural law theory?

What is the relation between naturalism and the natural law theory? Natural law (Britannica): natural law, in philosophy, system of right or justice held to be common to all humans and derived from ...
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Why is the rule of the law so easily damaged or broken?

Why is the rule of law so difficult to keep once established? Is it because of the limitation of law, or something to do with human emotions and behavior? We cannot break laws of nature, but law made ...
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Why is natural law ethics based on what happens in most cases? (St. Thomas Aquinas)

Summa Theologica II-II q. 154 a. 2: Nor does it matter if a man having knowledge of a woman by fornication, make sufficient provision for the upbringing of the child: because a matter that comes ...
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Are there in fact no laws of nature?

Are there in fact no laws of nature? This thought just occurred to me. Let me explain. We call certain true statements about the physical world laws of nature. But maybe the distinction between true ...
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How can our country be our "principle of being"? (St. Thomas Aquinas)

Summa Theologica II-II q. 101 a. 1: In the second place, the principles of our being and government (nostri esse et gubernationis principium) are our parents and our country (patria), that have given ...
Guilherme de Souza's user avatar
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St. Thomas Aquinas on the purposes of punishment

"The punishments of the present life are not sought for their own sake, because this is not the time of final retribution; but they are sought insofar as they are medicinal, aiding either the ...
Guilherme de Souza's user avatar
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Is Hobbes describing a 0th or 1st Law of Nature here?

In Hobbes' Leviathan, specifically section The Fundamental Law Of Nature contained in Chapter XIV, Hobbes says: "And consequently it is a precept, or generall rule of Reason, “That every man, ...
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How do proponents of the New Natural Law Theory (NNLT), such as John Finnis & Germain Grisez, define natural law?

I looked in the main books of NNLT, namely Natural Law and Natural Rights by John Finnis and The Way of the Lord Jesus by Germain Grisez, but I did not find a definition of natural law.
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