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Questions tagged [nietzsche]

Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) was a German philosopher and poet. Nietzsche is consistently one of the most widely-read philosophers, even among laymen; yet his work is often elliptical, even cryptic, and demands an unusual discipline with respect to reading and thinking. This contradiction may give some sense of the complexity and profundity of Nietzsche's powerful writing and explosive style. Much of his work can be understood as critique of nihilism.

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Why did Nietzsche believe that atomism was well-refuted?

Here are a couple of quotes from Beyond Good and Evil: As far as materialistic atomism goes: this is one of the most well-refuted things in existence. In Europe these days, nobody in the scholarly ...
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Was Zarathustra innately of a “higher” type

I get that Zarathustra is able to do great work, by the end of the book. But what I don't get is how those not predestined to greatness could take from Nietzsche body of work, except perhaps a mild ...
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How far does Nietzsche's skepticism of causality go?

On page 21 of Nietzsche's Beyond Good and Evil, I found the following quote: Suppose someone sees through the boorish naivete of this famous concept of "free will" and manages to get it out of his ...
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What are Nietzsche's views on truth and logic - for real this time

I'm trying to make sense of Beyond Good and Evil and Nietzsche's views at that time. The claims he makes about truth and logic seem problematic to me: "Granted, we will truth: why not untruth ...
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What does Nietzsche mean in his metaphor about dreaming and its relationship to truth?

I am having trouble understanding the following passage completely: In accordance with the root meaning of his association with “brightness,” he is the god of light; he also rules over the beautiful ...
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Interpretation of Nietzsche's aphorisms in Beyond Good An Evil

I have long been fascinated with the maxims in Beyond Good And Evil (Chapter 4). I have found great depth in many of them, but I suspect there may be other layers that I've missed. Also several of ...
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What is the “old religious formula” Nietzsche refers to?

to employ once more an old religious formula with a new and deeper meaning--it is some fundamental certainty which a noble soul has about itself, something which is not to be sought, is not to be ...
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Mussolini on Nietzsche

Does anyone have a link / explanation of Mussolini's writings on Nietzsche? Failing that, any of the early fascists.
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Are there any websites that walkthrough Nietzsche's work?

I have often seen sites dedicated to famous literary works that break down a composition and help explain it to the beginner. I've only taken one class on philosophy so I'm not going to understand ...
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Can a beginner in Philosophy understand the following books?

I know that Pythagoras is the basis for all the Philosophy (and probably mathematics). I ordered The Pythagorean Sourcebook and Library but I already have the following Philosophical books: ...
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Everything beautiful twice, or three times - or not?

In aphorism 339 in the Gay Science, Nietzsche contemplates the Greeks yet again. The Greeks, to be sure prayed: "Everything beautful twice, even three times". They implored the gods with good ...
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Why is Nietzsche here tying Physics to the categorical imperative?

In aphorism 335 in the Gay Science, that book or montage of aphorisms, written both carefully and carelessly; Nietzsche writes: Long live Physics!...what? You admire the categorical imperative ...
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Nietzsche's perspective in Philosophy of Art

What is the meaning of the pair Apollonian and Dionysian in Nietzsche's philosophy of art? In which work does Nietzsche expand his view?
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Duplicity and strength in humans

The background for the question is: I often struggle with feelings of a kind of resentment, and I believe that traditional morality isn't going to help with that. Nietzsche writes, in The Birth of ...
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Does Nietzsche acknowledge “mad states”?

An important aspect of Jung's analytical theory is his description of the conscious and unconscious desires of the personality. Specifically, Jung describes states of mind in which the person holds ...
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What confirms the claim that Friedrich Nietzsche was an atheist from a christian perspective?

In reading some of Nietzsche's works, his disappointment with humanity and God is evident to me. But so far I haven't seen any text by him where he explicitly endorses atheism. At the same time, many ...
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What does Nietzsche mean by “blond beast?”

This may be too much to ask but can someone explain what "blond beast" means in Nietzsche's On the Genealogy of Morals. I tried reading it from a couple of other sources but got confused.
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Are Nietzsche's “higher men” men of principle

Are Nietzsche's "higher men" men of principle - in their value judgments? Or do their principles extend only to meta-ethical claims, such as the will to power, the existence of higher and lower ...
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Joy accompanies, joy does not move

In Will to Power, Nietzsche wrote that joy accompanies, joy does not move This claim strikes me as false. Behind this seems to be the idea that power rather happiness motivates us. But I think ...
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“Ordering of rank” in the Will to Power 287 of Nietzsche

My philosophy aims at an ordering of rank: not at individualistic morality Quoted here on ask a philosopher, in a reply by Martin Jenkins, who seems to take this as highly conclusively, at least ...
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Why is Nietzsche considered a philosopher - but not Whitman?

Reading Whitmans epic - The Leaves of Grass recently; I was so struck by his language and it's similarity to Nietzsches that I suspected that he had been influenced or read him. For example: I ...
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Arguments against eternal return

I have encountered the concept of eternal return e.g. in reading about Friedrich Nietzsche (1844 – 1900) and Pythagoras (c. 570 – c. 495 BC). This is one formulation from Nietzsche's The Will To Power:...
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Popper, Nietzsche and knowledge

In many works of Karl Popper, he says, quoting Xenophanes, that all human knowledge is only conjectural, that modern science will never produce a true knowledge. The german philosopher, Friedrich ...
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Nietzsche and the abuse of power

I'm reading some aphorisms now, so though I could start a question :-) Nietzsche's main thesis seems to be that all morality is born of strength and weakness, in a number of ways - e.g. the pitiful ...
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Strong man of “ressentiment” and the ambiguity of Strength

I am new to the field of philosophy and am trying presently to read and understand Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morals. In the first essay, he talks about the popular morality and ressentiment; Which I ...
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What did Nietzsche mean by the words “ philosophizing with a hammer”?

What does Nietzsche mean by the words ' philosophizing with a hammer"?
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The man who wants to die

This is a phrase I stumbled across in Deleuze work on Nietzsche, but I don't know of where it appears in the latter's work. e.g. the distinction between the last man and the man who wants to die ...
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Is a perfect chaos possible?

There are various notions of chaos, in myth, science and philosophy: Nietzsche in the Gay Science wrote: the total character of the world is chaos for all eternity - in the sense of not of a lack ...
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How does the camel, the lion and the child apply to everyday life? [closed]

Having read several interpretations (noted below) of Nietzsche's Three Metamorphoses, how does this apply to everyday life? How do you apply it? When do you know you have metamorphosized? Sources ...
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What does Sartre mean with that existence precedes essence and how is it related to the earlier existential philosophers' thoughts?

What does Sartre mean with that existence precedes essence and how is it related to the earlier existential philosophers' thoughts? Existential philosophers like Kirkegaard, Heideggers and Friedrich ...
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Nietzsche's third metamorphosis: why is the Übermensch a child in spirit?

Three metamorphoses of the spirit do I designate to you: how the spirit becometh a camel, the camel a lion, and the lion at last a child... To create new values—that, even the lion cannot yet ...
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Can we trust Friedrich Nietzsche's perspective on isolationism?

Due to the fact that the audience of this question is comprised of individuals visiting a philosophy website, I can assume that the concept of introversion(within reason) will be met rather ...
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What is science in the 'gay science'?

First, I haven't read the book; but have come across some excerpts in one of Foucaults essays. It occurs to me that given Nietszches famous antipathy to Christianity, and that Adam/Eve were evicted ...
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Discredited readings of Nietzsche

“skeptical” view need not read Nietzsche as a global anti-realist — i.e., as claiming that there are no truths or facts about anything, let alone truths about value — a reading which has now been ...
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Would Deleuze affirm that Platos dialogues are a form of drama?

Deleuze, in Difference and Repetition writes: Drama has but a single form involving all three repetitions. Nietzsche's Zarathustra is clearly a drama, a theatrical work. It seems to me Platos ...
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What would Nietzsche's response be to these claims?

"The self (the "I") is the center of moral responsibility." "Morals express something higher in the human spirit, something more noble and more spiritual." "Religion constitutes the essence of the ...
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Did Friedrich Nietzsche believe in “the truth”?

It is well known that Friedrich Nietzsche was very condemnatory of the objective truth, however, while analyzing his words, it is difficult to ascertain whether or not he believes in the truth at all. ...
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Where to begin Nietzsche? [duplicate]

I am a mathematics student, but always interested in philosophical arguments especially on Love and God. I am also currently studying an extra course on philosophy of rationality which discusses ...
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Zarathustra and the History of Western Philosophy

Zarathustra is famously invoked by Nietzsche to sweep away a univocal theology - Western Christian monotheism; in the history of religions Zarathustra is famous as the founder of Zorastrianism; this a ...
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Must infinity involve repetitions?

Infinity for Nietzsche in at least one line of argument involves the eternal return; he refers to it in the Die fröhliche Wissenschaft and Also sprach Zarathustra; most completely in his Notes on the ...
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Nietzsche - crime, sin and punishments

Deleuze in Nietzsche and Philosophy wrote: In comparison with Christianity the Greeks are children. Their way of depreciating existence, their 'nihilism', does not have the perfection of the ...
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Is Schadenfreude a way out of amorality?

Theodor Adorno, defined Schadenfreude as "largely unanticipated delight in the suffering of another which is cognized as trivial and/or appropriate." Nietzsche comments that Schadenfreude ...
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What, for Nietzsche, is a noble death?

This thread Why is Nietzsche so against Socrates? on Socrates and Jesus's death and the article that I linked to there, got me glibly wondering... In Human, All to Human, Nietzsche says that How ...
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“Saving” Nietzsche?

Nietzsche claims we must say "yes" to life, and be healthy and strong that way. But he also makes scathing remarks both in Zarathustra and in his late notebooks, about the Biblical maxim "thou shalt ...
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Nietzsche and miracles

I came across this on google, and am struggling to flesh it out into something meaningful. Can anyone explain this quote: "believe with me in Dionysian life... but believe in the miracles of your god"...
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What social class was Socrates from?

Its well known that Plato was from the aritocratic elite of Athenian society. In his writings Socrates figure as his pre-eminent philosophical spokesperson. There is a adage, which might be a truism ...
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Isn't Nietzsche's Übermensch idea self-contradictory?

Doesn't Nietzsche's Übermensch contradicts itself in that understanding everything would enable propagation of that understanding? Wouldn't Nietzsche's Übermensch eventually fully understand how the ...
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Nietzsche and “The death of God” [duplicate]

In the 125th paragraph of "The Gay Science", Nietzsche announces the death of God but I have some doubts. Why God is dead? What is the reason of it? And why did Nietzsche announce it in front of an ...
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Why does Kierkegaard suggest indolence makes ressentiment dangerous?

Nietzsche is well known for his notion of ressentiment which he had taken from Kierkegaard and develops in the Anti-Christ; Kierkegaard notes In the Present Age the positive value of ressentiment in ...
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Why is Nietzsche so against Socrates?

Nietzsche recalls the story that Socrates says that 'he has been a long time sick', meaning that life itself is a sickness; Nietszche accuses him of being a sick man, a man against the instincts of ...