Questions tagged [paradox]

This tag is for arguments that produce an inconsistency with common sense.

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Can it be rational to have beliefs one knows to be inconsistent?

It seems that the answer would be yes, especially when we think about the example of the preface paradox (authors stating in prefaces "the errors that are found herein are mine alone", i.e. believing ...
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1answer
229 views

Omnipotence Paradox Defense and Meinongianism/Neo-Meinongianism

I was considering a solution to the omnipotence paradox in which excluding logical impossibilities from the definition of omnipotence is justified as follows. Consider the proposition, "God could ...
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How does supervaluationism resolve the Sorites paradox? Are there any problems with this resolution?

So I was reading about resolutions to the Sorites paradox, and I got most of them, but I didn't understand the one labelled supervaluationism. Would someone explain it to me in very basic terms please?...
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If everything is possible, is it possible for something to be impossible?

If everything is possible, is it possible for something to be impossible? Possibility and impossibility are modal notions; and are dual in the usual formulation; the SEP remarks: It would seem to ...
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Solution to the Grandfather's paradox - Inverse reincarnation? [closed]

One of the premises of the grandfather paradox in time travel is that of inconsistency. I.e, going back in time to kill your grandfather or grandmother prevents your birth. The solution is simple, ...
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What qualifies as the solving of a paradox?

How/when and by what criteria is a paradox considered to be solved? EDIT I understand that rejecting a premise and/or finding a flaw in reasoning can be wholly subjective. Considering the "this page ...
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'this statement is true' , 'this statement is not not true' [duplicate]

Given the following self-referential sentences a. this statement is true b. this statement is not not true are (a) and (b) intersubstitutable, given classical logic can one eliminate the double ...
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The future in the deflationary theory of truth

How does the deflationary theory of truth, which defines true and false in the following straightforward way The proposition that p is true iff p. The proposition that p is false iff p is not ...
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4answers
138 views

Liars paradox towards a solution?

This statement is not true 2.This statement is true only if true and not true. (1) and (2) are clearly different sentences, but do they express the same proposition? If yes, then it becomes clear ...
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4answers
515 views

Why can't we just say the Liar Sentence doesn't express a proposition?

It seems to me and many others that can we solve the Liar's Paradox by saying that the Liar Sentence "This sentence is false" doesn't express a proposition. However, both the IEP and the SEP claim ...
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How pardoxes relate to a theory's decidability and completeness

Would "this sentence is false" make a theory containing it both undecidable & incomplete, while "this sentence is unprovable" make a theory containing it incomplete(syntatically) but not ...
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65 views

What goes wrong if we explain Russell's paradox as resulting from an overly rigid link between property satisfaction and elementhood?

An excerpt from a question at Math SE (Bounty of 100 available for an answer): What goes wrong if we explain Russell's paradox as resulting from an overly rigid link between property satisfaction and ...
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Does “Uncertainty is the only certainty” cause any paradox?

It seems to me that this avoids the self contradictory "everything is uncertain, even uncertainty" while allowing agnostic positions, by allowing only uncertainty as the only thing certain, sort of ...
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Can we create a paradox of self-consciousness?

On the theme of Russell's paradox: Does the set of all sets that do not contain themselves contain itself? And the Barber's paradox: Does a barber who shaves all men who do not shave themselves ...
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4answers
354 views

Does the uncertainty principle resolve Zeno’s arrow paradox?

Zeno’s arrow paradox says that motion is impossible. Does quantum mechanics say that the underlying assumption is wrong? Assumption: in any given moment, an arrow in flight is motionless. Then it ...
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1answer
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Zeno's “Stadium” with the same metaphysical assumptions as his other paradoxes

“The Stadium” paradox is described by Aristotle as follows: The fourth argument is that concerning the two rows of bodies, each row being composed of an equal number of bodies of equal size, ...
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What is the justification for the claim that observing something that is both a raven and black increases the likelihood that all ravens are black?

Suppose that I have access to a machine that allows me to input a positive integer (perhaps up to ten decimal digits) and the machine will -- depending only on the input -- output a statement. If the ...
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184 views

Although Russell's paradox has the virtue of simplicity, is it a distraction from other paradoxes of naive set theory?

Given that Russell's paradox exhibits a contradiction in naive set theory, the interpretation of the binary relation "∈" called "membership" (where the expression "x ∈ m" is pronounced as "x is an ...
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Basic question regarding the “Liar Paradox”

I know that the Liar Paradox has been discussed a fair bit on here, but I have a question about it that seems a bit more fundamental. Perhaps it has been asked and answered here in more proper ...
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184 views

Paradox with regards to detachment

Recently I got a chance to read 'Gita' where the central paradigm is 'Detachment', which goes absolutely against my intuition which I explain below. Let's take example of Feynman, who was so ...
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3answers
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Can Zenos paradox of motion be applied to a flashing blue light?

Zenos paradoxes of motion generally refer to actual motion through space; however for Aristotle this is motion in only one sense; an other sense could be alteration, for example change in shape and so ...
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Are there paradoxes involved in allowing for an unrestricted domain in predicate logic?

I've put some thought into this, and just want to make sure I'm on track, or if I need to be corrected. Basically, my answer is this: Yes, you need to always specify a domain when formalizing into ...
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A Question Regarding Russell's Paradox

Consider the 'set' behind Russell's Paradox: R = { x | x is a set and x ∉ x } in light of Cantor's definition of set ("aggregate"/Menge) in his CONTRIBUTIONS TO ...
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Why isn't Cantor's diagonal argument just a paradox?

Cantor's diagonal argument concludes the cardinality of the power set of a countably infinite set is greater than that of the countably infinite set. In other words, the infiniteness of real numbers ...
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Is there a logic of married bachelors?

I'm sure this question must have a simple clarification, but I am largely unfamiliar with the branches of formal logic and not sure where to look for it. We know that "All bachelors are unmarried men"...
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What is an example of a true contradiction in a paraconsistent logic?

While reading the Wikipedia article on trivialism I noticed the following: In classical logic, trivialism is in direct violation of Aristotle's law of noncontradiction. In philosophy, trivialism is ...
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Liar paradox from a different view/resolved?

Informally, the statement T: T: "this statement is not both true and not true" a) T is not true if and only if it is both true and not true b) T is true if and only if it is not both true and not ...
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263 views

What was the importance of the Liars Paradox in Stoic Logic?

Chrysippus, an influential stoic philosopher wrote 21 books (chapters) in 12 works on the Liars Paradox. This implies that this paradox was of some importance to their epistomology and logic. Why?
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How did Aristotle or St. Thomas resolve the liar's paradox?

How did Aristotle or St. Thomas Aquinas (such as in one of his commentaries on Aristotle) resolve the liar's paradox?
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Paradox of motion in the emptiness

The philosophers of the Eleatic school, analyzing the nature of the movement, came to this paradox: in order for the body to move, it needs emptiness. But what is emptiness? This is what exists, but ...
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Tractatus 3.333 and Russell's paradox

Can anyone explain to a non-logician how Tractatus 3.333 refutes (or fails to refute) Russell's Paradox? Please explain his use of symbols!
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289 views

relativism and russell's paradox

Relativism is the idea that there is no universal, objective truth, and instead depends on the context and perspective. There is one concerning point however, which is the following relativistic ...
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A Paradox for Anti-Realism?

Semantic Anti-Realists hold that a claim has a (constructive) proof if the claim is true. I wonder whether this position runs into a version of Yablo's supposedly non-circular version of the liar ...
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Looking for existing discourse on the category of fallacies exemplified by “paradox of tolerance”

Popper coined the phrase "paradox of tolerance" when discussing how unlimited tolerance is self-contradictory (paradoxical) in that it precludes self-preservation (resisting intolerance). The seeming ...
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What is the main message Kierkegaard is trying to deliver in his suicidal quote?

In his journal Kierkegaard wrote: I have just now come from a party where I was its life and soul; witticisms streamed from my lips, everyone laughed and admired me, but I went away — yes, the dash ...
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Is there a natural example of a non-self-referential semantic paradox in philosophy?

A commonly studied paradox is the liar's paradox. The liar's paradox is to determine whether "this statement is false". The usual resolution is to state this the sentence is not actually a statement ...
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Did calculus solve Zeno's paradoxes [duplicate]

Let's start form two versions of Dichotomy paradox Version 1: Anyone can't walk though any distance without walk though half of it and so on. solution 0 (?) ... which is false I think, that's not ...
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1answer
141 views

The Sartre Paradox

"According to Sartre, humans are the only beings that dont have an essence." Do't look a little "weird" J.P Sartre, tells that the "Man is comdemned to be free", in case conjuring that, the freedom ...
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Russel's paradoxical set from a different view

Suppose naïve set theory, let's do a tought experiment: Informally, let's define a set € such that € contains all the sets that don't contain themselves.(yes, all but not necessarily only those), ...
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An erotetic argument about the liar paradox

I noticed something about the liar paradox, when the liar sentences are taken as questions. Let’s start with the liar index, “This sentence is false.” Allow this to be questioned: “Is this sentence ...
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Does God have the power to make identical universes through different means?

The easiest way to explain this question is with a thought experiment: Consider God, the ultimate of everything, who is wholly omnipotent (all-powerful) and omniscient (all-knowing). Let's just say, ...
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Is determinism logically flawed?

If determinism is true, every event shall have a cause. So, what is the cause of the first event (which is the first cause)? Conflict (paradox): 1) every event shall have a cause -> First event/...
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The origin of a particular self-reference paradox

This is a simple reference request, for the origin of a particular type of paradoxical statement. The example I remember is Roger Penrose can't consistently claim this statement to be true. It's a ...
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Does anyone know of a philosophy which rectifies or considers the following question?

Let's imagine that I began to doubt the validity of one of my arguments, which leads me to question my ability to make rational arguments. And so begin to distrust my intuitive ideas about logic, then ...
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Can a sentence without a truth value be true?

I was doing some very, super, light reading on self reference. It seems to me that the statement nothing that I say is true both: cannot be understood with the T-schema; is self referential. - ...
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Modal logics - philosophical paradoxes using modeling by possible worlds

I'm searching for "paradoxes" in classical modal logics, meaning lines of reasoning which give a counterintuitive conclusion if performed in classical logic, which can be modelled by the (semantical) ...
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Pragmatic encroachment: how is the basis for X being accurate different from the basis of when it is accurate to say someone knows that X is accurate?

When is it accurate to say that a person (P) knows that X is true/accurate? This question seems to be answered by the idea/concept of 'Pragmatic Encroachment'; The basic idea/concept of 'Pragmatic ...
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1answer
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Cause and Effect - Finished infinity [closed]

I have a question it's best if I give you an example right away. Our universe has its limits. in terms of the effect or cause e.g. if we kill a human for some reason will also have the effect. I'm ...
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Is a paradox a concept?

Obviously 'paradox' is a concept, we name certain things to be so. We share the knowledge of those things through the use of language. But those things, "in themselves", those particular "instances of ...
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The paradox of comprehension

If it can be known it cannot be communicated. Seemingly Gorgias held an ability to be communicated as intrinsic to the reality of a concept. And why not? Since for a solipsist there would be no ...