Questions tagged [philosophy-of-language]

for philosophical questions concerning the nature, origins, and usage of natural language

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Does the success of AI (Large Language Models) support Wittgenstein's position that "meaning is use"?

By 'success' we think of current AI/LLMs capacity of producing text that is regarded as coherent, informative, even convincing, by human readers [see for instance Spitale et al. and Salvi et al.] ...
ac15's user avatar
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3 votes
15 answers
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Can religions die out specifically lose followers and consequently stop existing? (ontologically speaking)

This question arose after I watched the movie Dune and made some interesting finds regarding the religious and sociopolitical environment of this masterpiece. So the question arose, when I realized ...
How why e's user avatar
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3 votes
6 answers
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Can definitions in the Oxford Dictionary of the English Language be considered definitive in informal philosophical presentations?

I ran into an interesting problem recently, in which several definitions I extrapolated from the subject dictionary catastrophically failed to support the validity of my position. Full disclosure, I ...
JOHNS WOOD GADGETS's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
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Is there the language in the mind and how it changes based on the language in the world?

I have realized that I was thinking in keywords, just like I use on Google, and not in the words itself. So I started to think if there is a "language" that the mind uses to create language ...
PageSteiner's user avatar
6 votes
10 answers
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Does a sentence exist if it is not written, spoken, or even thought of?

If a sentence is never written, spoken, or even thought of, does it still exist? Let me illustrate what I mean. Suppose there is a mathematical sentence, say in some first-order language L, which is a ...
user107952's user avatar
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4 votes
3 answers
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Non sequitur claims when deducing meaning from historical artifacts or texts (problem of presentism)

So my question arises from an argument that I have seen regarding some people debating over some ancient inscriptions. My question is as follows, "Wouldn't any possible explanation for the ...
How why e's user avatar
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0 votes
3 answers
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Is there a partly physical nature to infinitesimal limits that connects the utility of calculus with the quantized nature of small-scale physics?

One argument against calculus being physical is that since quantum mechanics has a quantized discrete nature, then physics does not truly have infinitesimal quantities. Yet, calculus and its ...
William Solomon's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
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Why is identifying Frege's indirect sense with customary sense problematic?

In Miller's Philosophy of Language, it is explained that the identification of an expression's indirect sense (i.e. its referent in a doubly indirect context) with its customary sense (i.e. its ...
Dimen's user avatar
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1 answer
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Is the failure of substitutivity in an intensional context simply due to a lack of clarity in terms of the identity operator?

The oft-given example to demonstrate the failure of substitutivity in an intensional context goes as follows: (P1) Lois Lane believes Superman can fly (P2) Superman is Clark Kent (C) Lois Lane ...
Max Maxman's user avatar
15 votes
15 answers
2k views

Can we know that something exists even if we can't explain or define it?

Can a person know that something like "free will" must exist even though an exact definition in words, using language, cannot be provided, and in the absence of a complete theory that ...
Mark's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
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When is the proposition expressed by "I am here" necessary?

I'm currently reading Kaplan's On The Logic of Demonstratives (1979). He considers the example (1) I am here now. and on page 84 he argues that (b) In almost (if not all) contexts, an utterance of (...
Harpagos's user avatar
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7 answers
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Is belief nothing but a feeling of certainty about what something means?

Or to rephrase, can beliefs also be shaped by doubts and intuitions?
Nitin Sheokand's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
26 views

In the field of exploring the fusion of pragmatics and semantics, which scholars and papers are worth paying attention to?

In the field of exploring the fusion of pragmatics and semantics, which scholars and papers are worth paying attention to? For example, I'm interested in John Perry's "Belief Semantics" and ...
yetao hu's user avatar
7 votes
13 answers
3k views

Can ChatGPT provide any value as a sounding board for philosophical exploration?

In my experiences with ChatGPT (3 sessions - 6 hrs, 2hrs and 4 hrs) it has done amazingly, exceedingly, mind-blowingly well. (And I am an ex-programmer, not so easy to surprise or impress). I asked ...
Alistair Riddoch's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
77 views

Arguments Against Quantifier Neutralism?

Are there any good arguments for rejecting quantifier neutrality advocated in Azzouni’s “Ontology Without Borders”?
GhostRocket's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
77 views

Unusual change of meaning of word "any" in negative sentences form "for all" to "there exists". Predicate logic

Question. Why does the word "any" in negative sentences changes its meaning from "for all" to "there exists"? Origin of the question. I have a question about translating ...
Alex Alex's user avatar
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9 votes
10 answers
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The problem of philosophy?

“The problem of philosophy is a linguistic problem, and every disagreement can be traced back to a difference in interpretation.” “No wonder we know that the deepest problems are not really problems ...
Muhhamedbinghazi's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
133 views

Are we incapable of loving ourselves, does love only come from the outside?

Love only comes from the outside, it brings you back into attachment to what you cannot control and instigate. Love is an alienated area that advances from the unknown, from a place different from me. ...
Hadibinalshiab's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
159 views

How does the claim that existence is not a predicate of objects interact with abstract objects?

It's occured to me that Kant's famous argument that "existence" is not a predicate whatsoever, which eventually became the prevailing position on the subject due to Frege and Russell, seems ...
Johnathan Green's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
149 views

What's the point of developing various theories of reference?

I cannot comprehend how is it philosophically interesting to research this stuff: whether causal historical-theory is correct or not etc. I am really puzzled by people working in the field: Clearly, ...
user avatar
7 votes
4 answers
260 views

Are these introductory logic textbooks wrong to teach ‘unless’ = ‘or’?

Colin Fine answered on Unless" does not equal "or" 'directly and intuitively'. This contradicts the textbooks beneath. Who is correct? Let me ask this here, as I prefer answers from ...
H7 De's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
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By what generic method do we correctly determine that an analytical expression of language is true?

The answer to this is a philosophy of logic question would seem to unify the notion of analytic truth across all formal and natural languages. This subject of this question seems to refer to the ...
polcott's user avatar
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10 votes
10 answers
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Is it feasible to alter "well-established" languages?

I have met this problem several times. I think many natural languages are not really particularly usefully structured, because they contain things like irregularities and unnecessary syntax variations....
mavavilj's user avatar
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4 votes
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Could general-AI language generation be a test for sentience, sapience, or consciousness?

One of the oft-cited examples of how to test if Artificial Intelligence (AI) is intelligent (often expanded to sentient) is the Turing test. Simply, an AI or machine passes the Turing test if it can ...
geoscience123's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
65 views

Is it possible the shattered glass has never been shattered? [closed]

You know we usually say "broken windown" when window has broken, "rotten food" when food has rotten. Is it possible the shattered glass has never been shattered? I'm wondering ...
user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
217 views

Is Hegel's system really without presuppositions?

It is stated that Hegel was looking to start his system of logic and philosophy in general with what has absolutely no assumptions, frameworks, or presupposed things whatsoever. Is this really ...
Gerald Robertson's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
53 views

What are the arguments for innatism, essentialism, and rationalism?

How do people justify some existents being absolutely necessary. Why cant it just be against a backdrop of a relative nothingness? How can someone justify certain ideas being absolutely essential and ...
Gerald Robertson's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
116 views

Do all theories require frameworks or assumptions to make? if so, why?

In philosophy class, particularly in epistenology, professors seem to have the assumption that to conceive of the concept of anything at all, including even this sentence now requires we have ...
Gerald Robertson's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
74 views

Can ideas be perfectly illustrated using non-mathematical language?

Reading through many philosophy forums it seems like many ideas get bogged down in the definitions of ideas which seem to go down an endless spiral of caveats and contradictions depending on who ...
Hooman's user avatar
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2 answers
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Can we define everything including even what I'm writing now or are some things undefined?

I noticed that every logical theory seems to have a meta logic or language. For instance, we say "x is so and so, it is different from so and so, therefore, x is y, etc." We have not defined ...
Gerald Robertson's user avatar
7 votes
5 answers
1k views

What is language? Why can I “just understand” it?

my mental health is deteriorating a bit. I just want to know why I can understand language and use it so easily to communicate to other human creatures without even trying. Is it just an “instrument ...
Fraser Pye's user avatar
2 votes
4 answers
2k views

Is a false dichotomy still a dichotomy?

Given that an [adjective] X is still an X, is a false dichotomy still a dichotomy? This question is not exactly like asking one about a false belief, but it is similar as far as the wordplay is ...
SO_fix_the_vote_sorting_bug's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
139 views

Is there a recognized topic in philosophy regarding the fallaciousness of debating what the ‘correct’ definition of a word is?

Or, what the defining properties of some thing are. For example, I might say, “Socialism is a government in which such-and-such happens,” and someone else might say, “No, socialism is when a society ...
Julius Hamilton's user avatar
1 vote
4 answers
99 views

Is it circular to say the meaning of the name "Feynman" is "the famous physicist called 'Feynman'"?

Additionally, if you think it is circular, is it fully circular or just partially circular, and does that distinction even make sense? I feel like the notion of 'partially circular' is self ...
Krip-bukka-ke's user avatar
8 votes
4 answers
3k views

If Large Language Models can do Maths, is Formalism true?

A slightly flippant question, but curious to see what my platonist rivals might have to say! One of the proported reasons that Open-AI was having business politics trouble was the suggestion that ...
Paul Ross's user avatar
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0 votes
4 answers
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Question about Differences in Existential Quantification [closed]

Existent objects don't exist. There are no existent object. It seems 1 is inconsistent and 2 consistent. Both propositions seem to declare something exists, but is there a difference in these claims? ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
46 views

If "the king of France isn't bald" is not definite description [duplicate]

If "the king of France isn't bald" is not definite description, but it's "a king of France isn't bald", does it not necessarily imply the existence of a king of France? The king ...
user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
50 views

The relationship between logical systems and natural language semantics

Every student of philosophy knows that there are systems of logic and that those systems are analyzed in terms of logical properties like soundness, consistency, decidability, completeness, etc. These ...
Julius Hamilton's user avatar
7 votes
5 answers
2k views

Is mathematics analytic or synthetic?

This question is related to another question I posted but I think it requires its own treatment since of the already wide scope of the other question i.e. Is the classical theory of concepts ...
user21312's user avatar
  • 139
6 votes
3 answers
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What's the name of a fallacy when a debater selectively picks facts and ignores others?

In many debates in various fields of political science, it happens that historical events are called upon to make a case or support an argument. However, it also happens quite often that a debater, in ...
Leon's user avatar
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0 votes
4 answers
118 views

Why do some philosphers including Russell paraphrase this sentence?

To say “Pegasus doesn’t exist” is to say “it is not the case that there is exactly one x which is a flying horse of Greek mythology”. https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/nonexistent-objects/ “Pegasus ...
user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
67 views

In what shape do opposites exist?

A common notion is that the opposite of “cold” is “warm” and that the opposite of “slow” is “fast”. Would it be equally correct to say that the opposite of “cold” is “fast”? How come that most people ...
Ethan Brown's user avatar
-1 votes
6 answers
5k views

Is "that nose is fake" nonsense?

As you know, a fake nose is not a nose. Why I think "that nose is fake" is nonsense is this: "That nose" supposes there's a nose, but "that nose which is fake" supposes ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
85 views

Can semantics work independently apart from philosophy? [closed]

"Colorless green ideas sleep furiously." It implies grammar can work independently apart from semantics. So I was thinking: "Can semantics work independently apart from philosophy."...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
80 views

Omniscience leads to necessitarianism

You have probably seen these types of arguments before on incompatibility of omniscience and free will. The question is are these arguments valid and what can be a good refutation? Let G= x is known ...
Vihan 's user avatar
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3 votes
5 answers
1k views

"Unround circles don't exist." Is it nonsense?

All circles are round. All circles are not unround. Then, is "unround circles don't exist" nonsense itself because "unround circles" is a contradiction? I think even if circles ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
34 views

How does a language contain its own semantics?

I'm baffled by one phrase in Tarski's papers: "the language which contains its own semantics". Here is the passage: The analysis of the antinomies mentioned shows, on the contrary, that the ...
Speakpigeon's user avatar
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3 votes
3 answers
108 views

Is necessary existence a property?

If existence is not a property then doesn't it follow that necessary existence is also not a property? If it is then why?
Vihan 's user avatar
  • 121
-1 votes
1 answer
80 views

On philosophy of language? [closed]

What are the current theories which deal with the time evolution of language? Are they retroactive or predictive?
More Anonymous's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
179 views

Does saying "a morally good singer is a morally good person" undermine Geach's attempt to undermine Moore?

Correct me if I'm wrong, but Peter Geach used the infelicity of statements like, "A good singer is thusly a good person," to try to show that G. E. Moore's sense of the word "good" ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar

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