Questions tagged [philosophy-of-logic]

Philosophy of logic is a branch of philosophy concerned with investigating the nature, scope and role of logic.

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Are axioms more important than definitions?

To prove a theorem in mathematics we usually use our axioms, definitions and other already proved theorems. Suppose we wante to prove a specific theorem and we haven't prove any other theorem and also ...
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Do mathematical objects exist after their definition? [duplicate]

Suppose we have a system with a set of axioms. Now we begined to define new terms. E.g. in maths we have a particular set of axioms and then we define what a function is. But do all the functions ...
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Does truth exist without proof?

When we prove something (e.g. in maths) we show that a particular statement is true. But if we couldn't prove that statement that doesn't mean that the statement would be false right? So is proof a ...
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How much of a nonstarter is this argument that tautologies are (true-ish but) not true?

I am wondering how much of a nonstarter you think this argument is. I am also interested in suggestions concerning articles or books to read. (More recent works preferred, as I can follow their ...
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Possible Models

A model consists in one or more possible worlds. Necessity in a world is determined by its associated set of possible worlds. I am curious whether there is any work that involves an account of ...
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One-paragraph explanation of the principle the counterexample by modern logicians? [closed]

Is there any good, one-paragraph explanation of the principle and importance of the counterexample in logic by a modern logician (19th to 21st century)?
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Where is the fallacy in Seth Yalcin's counterexample to the modus tollens?

Where is the fallacy, do you think, in Seth Yalcin’s argument (2012) that the Modus Tollens is not a generally valid form of argument? Seth Yalcin’s counterexample to the Modus Tollens (MT) https://...
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Is atheism the null hypothesis on god's existence? Can the null hypothesis be accepted? Is the proposition “god does not exist” falsifiable?

 Is Atheism the Null Hypothesis?  Is Atheism Falsifiable?  Does Atheism Carry the Burden of Proof? Atheism has distinct definitions which can be categorized as follows: • Weak/Soft ...
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Using logic to do metalogical proofs? Is there a circularity problem here?

(1) If modus tollens were not correct, then I could have (P-->Q), ~Q and P. (2) But I cannot have (P--> Q) , ~Q and P. For, in that case, I would have (~P v Q) and ~Q and P; which means I would have ...
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Does the liar's paradox have solutions? what about X is both not true and not false? [duplicate]

The Liar's Paradox &; Aristotle's Laws of Thought: Laws of Non-Contradiction (LNC), Excluded Middle (LEM) Let: X := "This statement (X) is false". QUESTIONS to Consider: Q1. What is the ...
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Any concrete, real life example of Peirce's Law?

What would be a real life, concrete example of Peirce's Law? ((p → q) → p) → p There is a Wikipedia article on it, if you are unfamiliar with it: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peirce's_law There ...
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268 views

The understanding of logic presupposes a kind of understanding of natural language, doesn't it?

Our understanding of logic needs at least a basic understanding of words over a finite alphabet,natural language and numbers. For example,when we write down (one way) the definition of the atomic ...
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What is the difference between Law of Excluded Middle and Principle of Bivalence?

Law of Excluded Middle: In logic, the law of excluded middle (or the principle of excluded middle) is the third of the so-called three classic laws of thought. It states that for any proposition, ...
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Is it logically permissible to neither believe nor disbelieve a proposition X? Or does this violate the law of excluded middle?

Given a proposition X, one can either believe it or disbelieve it. Is it logical however to neither believe X nor disbelieve X? Is it logical to neither believe proposition X nor its negation ~X? I ...
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Can animals follow logical rules of inference?

I've been trying to recall a thought experiment, which I very vaguely remember to have come across either in Davidson or Dennett, that considers the following scenario: A hound is chasing its quarry ...
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Are mathematical axioms arbitrary?

I've been thinking recently about whether or not mathematical axioms are arbitrary. I'm trying to figure out what axioms in systems are derived from and just how arbitrary they really are. My main ...
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What does the truth-value of a material implication represent?

This question comes from my attempts to understand what the truth value for a material implication with a false antecedent represents. I have seen several justifications for this convention, usually ...
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Deductive reasoning & conditionals

What would be a good example of explicit deductive reasoning that doesn't seem to be possibly interpreted correctly as a conditional (If A, then B)?
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Equivalence Thesis

What is, if any, the canonical justification accepted in mathematical logic for the Equivalence Thesis, asserting (1) that indicative conditionals are truth-functional logical expressions and (2) that ...
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Was Hans Reichenbach really a logical empiricist? Did he really think that logic was empirical?

I was reading an article in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy about Hans Reichenbach 1, and I have a specific question about it that I would like to ask. There, it is said that: Reichenbach ...
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Semantic rules overdetermine the truth value of Liar Paradox

I am reading Graham Priest's In Contradiction (p.14) and he mentioned that the semantic rules of 'this sentence' and 'is True' overdetermine and underdetermine the Liar Paradox and its counterpart ...
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Arguing that English does not satisfy the Tarski condition by appealing to truth value gap

I am reading Graham Priest's In Contradiction (P.12), where he is asserting that English satisfies the Tarski condition (a variant of semantic closure) and thus contains true contradiction. He ...
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Why isn't Cantor's diagonal argument just a paradox?

Cantor's diagonal argument concludes the cardinality of the power set of a countably infinite set is greater than that of the countably infinite set. In other words, the infiniteness of real numbers ...
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105 views

Contradiction vs Impossiblity

When we do proof by contradiction we think in the following way: Suppose we know that Q is true. We assume that not P is true and through implications we conclude not Q is true. Now how we proceed ...
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Does it hold that everything exists necessarily?

In Quantified modal logic, "constancy’s defenders can point to certain powerful arguments in its favor. Here’s a quick sketch of one such argument. First, the following seems to be a logical truth: ...
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If-then statements meaning in everyday vs mathematics

In mathematics when a "P implies Q" statement is true it means that every time P is true, Q is true also. What about everyday usage? For example consider the statement: "If it is raining, then I am ...
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Non-consistent mathematical axioms

It is known that axioms are the building blocks of mathematics. Differents sets of axioms different "games". What I don't understand is how do we know that we pick axioms that are consistent? . Does ...
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Question on the “Property of an Object” and the “Action of an Object” (+the “State of an Object”)

I have confronted a philosophical problem related to the definition of the "property of an object." What I believe is: The capability of an object (the capability to desire) is the property of an ...
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What is the ontological status of the laws of logic? [duplicate]

Are the laws of logic abstract objects that exist independently of physical things? Are they the same in all possible worlds? Are they man-made constructs, nothing more than ideas in our minds? Or ...
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Some questions on “context” in Mathematical Logic

Recently I was having a discussion with user21820 in this chatroom. There very naively (in the sense that I didn't choose carefully each word of my following statement) I expressed the opinion that, ...
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What exactly is informal logic and is this what I'm looking for?

I've been reading and researching about formal and symbolic logic for some time now, mainly out of interest in rationality. But I've come to a point where the various logical systems seem more like ...
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How/Why is the explanation/prediction of physical phenomena not deductive?

Why is the explanation of the triboelectric effect or the electrostatic effect(indicative examples) not deductive? How so we have a set of premises and from them follows the conclusion which is what ...
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Why is Truth the default designated value in logic and language?

It seems that investigations of language and logic have focused on truth as the assumed designated value (the value preserved by valid entailments). It is only in later, non-classical logic that non-...
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How did Wittgenstein become interested in the philosophy of language?

As far as I know he was doing engineering and became interested in the foundations of mathematics and went to Frege and upon his advice he went to study logic from Russell. So what happened which ...
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What counts as a logically necessarily true statement and what is not?

"If an existing population contains both mortal and immortal beings, some members of that population are not subject to death." Is this statement considered logically necessarily true? I personally ...
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Is Classical Logic the proper model of the deductive logic of human reasoning?

Which mathematicians and philosophers unambiguously claimed that Classical Logic was the proper model of the deductive logic of human reasoning, and when did they say it? The expression "Classical ...
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Who first proposed that A → (B ∧ ¬B) ⊢ ¬A was the principle of proof of some theorems?

The proof of various theorems are nowadays routinely described as "proof by contradiction". For example, the following theorems: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proof_by_contradiction The ...
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Is there a method for identifying the logical form of everyday speech sentences?

Is there a method for identifying the logical form of everyday speech sentences? Did any logicians attempt to establish such a method? Bertrand Russell gave a few examples of that but nothing ...
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Excluded middle versus bivalence [duplicate]

In logic, the law of excluded middle (or the principle of excluded middle) states that for any proposition, either that proposition is true or its negation is true. This principle should not be ...
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Can we know that law of non contradiction is true a priori?

I have seen some arguments for why should we accept law of non contradiction, and it seems to works in almost all areas. But some argument for it is like an argument for principle "nothing comes from ...
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Is Herbrand semantics a kind of term formalism?

Michael Genesereth and Eric Kao describe Herbrand semantics as follows: Herbrand semantics is an alternative semantics for First Order Logic based on truth assignments for ground sentences rather ...
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How do Descartes' definitions of 'a priori' and a 'posteriori' effect the current generalized understanding of these two distinctions?

The noted and highly respected pluralist, Dr. Richard Mckeon, in his introductory comments to the International Institute of Philosophy's 'Entretiens in Jerusalem, in 1977, quotes from Descartes ...
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In non-platonism, can undecidable statements have truth value?

Most sources I can find about Gödel's incompleteness theorems summarize the result as "there exist true arithmetical statements that have no proof." It seems coherent to say that there exist ...
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Can/Do there exist any quantifiers other than “there exists” and “for all”?

I'm curious about why there are only the two logical quantifiers there exists and for all. Intuition and human language support the idea that these quantifiers make sense, but otherwise it seems ...
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Did logicists use mathematical entities (in their attempt) to reduce mathematics to logic?

Two concepts F,G are equinumerous if there exists a one-to-one correspondence between the objects that fall under F and G. Equinumerosity is one the most fundamental building blocks of Gottlob ...
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Bibliography about non-mathematical applications of logic:

I have been recently playing with modal and temporal modal logics in the context of "organisms" (mostly after some study of entelechy in Aristotle and relatedly, some ideas of current biology). I have ...
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Justification for the paradigm of abductive reasoning

In Chance , Love and Logic, Peirce defines reasoning into two categories: analytic and non-analytic. All forms of reasoning have three fundamental components: rule, case, result. Analytic reasoning ...
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Which of common rules of inference are rejected on some philosophical grounds?

My question is: is there a mathematical or philosophical basis for rejecting any of the following rules of inference? If yes, then what is the argument for rejecting any of them? I am asking this ...
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What are the eventual purposes of symbolic logic?

What is the teleology of logic? Every body of knowledge has to have a teleology for which it's designed. The body of knowledge in logic doesn't clearly have any teleology or any purpose to which it ...
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Are the “laws” of deductive logic empirically verifiable?

"Is Logic Empirical?" strongly suggests a question that I would like very much to get a handle on. That phrase is a title of an article by Hilary Putnam, and, according to synopses/reviews, the ...

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