Questions tagged [philosophy-of-mind]

Philosophy of mind is a branch of philosophy that studies the nature of the mind, mental events, mental functions, mental properties, consciousness, and their relationship to the physical body, particularly the brain.

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Ontology and Abstract Concepts

Can ontology study abstract concepts as an object of study in themselves supporting that concepts and ideas are and exist since someone thought of them? Please provide references explaining how and ...
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Curious about how people will respond to these thought-provoking questions [closed]

No right or wrong answer. Just curious about how different everyone’s response will be. (Questions aren’t in relation with “identity”/American Identity) 1) How do you define what an American? Or in ...
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Is rudeness a form of selfishness? [closed]

Can rudeness be seen as a form of selfishness? If so, how? and under what circumstances would it not be considered selfish? If someone is rude to another human being without any reason, could that be ...
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Why babies don't like food? [closed]

Eating is vital for survival. Nature seems to have made this universal across all creature to look for food. But why (human) mothers spend so much time in feeding babies. Why they never like food?
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What does “theory of mind” mean in the context of this paper?

In my mind - pun intended - a/the theory of mind refers to some proposed solution to the mind body problem, e.g. Cartesian Dualism is a theory of mind, Functionalism is a theory of mind, etc... This ...
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How do epiphenomenalists explain our knowledge of felt-states?

The traditional epiphenomenalist claim is that the mental properties are simply a by-product of neurophysiological events and so have no causal efficacy over the physical world. This obviously implies ...
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What replaces folk psychology concepts when taking neurosciences serious?

When neuroscience and neuroscientists tell us1 that specific kinds of concepts (entities and processes) of good ol' folk psychology don't really exist (in a scientifically meaningful manner) ...
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Where does Descartes actually make his argument from doubt for mind-body distinction?

In Meditations II, we see Descartes make the assertion that he must exist whenever he thinks "I think, I am", and the existence of the thinking thing is undoubtable. But as he can still doubt the ...
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Arguments against quantum mechanics allowing for free will?

There have been similar questions asked here [1] [2], but I'm asking something a bit more specific. I've ofter heard the argument that quantum mechanics might somehow make free will possible because ...
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64 views

Do we imagine the World?

If yes, please elucidate what must be the case such that we can make the statement : "We imagine the World". If no (or if the question is meaningless/absurd) please demonstrate using logical ...
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What does “there is something that it is like” in Thomas Nagel's “What Is It Like to Be a Bat?” mean?

I was reading The enigma of human consciousness in ANNALS of the New York Academy of Sciences and this came up: think it’s very hard to define consciousness in terms of anything more basic than ...
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297 views

How is the causality of mind consistent with the law of conservation of energy?

How is the causality of mind consistent with the law of conservation of energy? Intuitively, the mind can influence the physical world (with causality), and it is hard to see how such causality does ...
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What is different between causation and causality [closed]

What is different between causation and causality? And, if there is any difference, do most philosophers recognize it or is it just common among UCL or Cambridge scholars? Thank you for your answer ...
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Has Alexandre Grothendieck ever expounded a particular stance on metaphysics or ontology?

It seems that in Recoltes et Semailles, he does go into quite a bit of philosophizing. the only thing of relevance I've found is that he notes how Riemann "in passing" said how he thought perhaps the "...
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Is Conciliating/Meeting in the Middle ever rational in relation to Uniqueness Thesis and Permissiveness?

Say that you and your epistemic peer have the same evidence but disagree about P. You can: Conciliate/Meet in the Middle: when you learn that you believe P and that your peer believes ~P (or: you ...
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I could prove: Solipsism is wrong. Is my argument acceptable?

Solipsism is the idea that one cannot be sure of anyone's existence but only themself. I think that one can assume this idea to be right and then prove that this is wrong. This self-inconsistency ...
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87 views

Are these arguments — in philosophy of mind?

Do any of these arguments [epiphanies] exist in the philosophy of mind? Consciousness is a complex structure, and it is unlikely to be realizable in just any structure, else anything big enough would ...
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Question about anchoring and adjustment (Tversky and Kahneman) and why anchoring often yields correct judgments

I am working on a problem set and I am having some difficulty wrapping my head around a concept introduced by Tversky and Kahneman. My problem set asks the question "Why does anchoring nevertheless ...
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What is the utility of consciousness if free will is an illusion?

Introspectively speaking, it seems to me obvious that free will is illusion. Thoughts just emerge from background causes, and actions are just thoughts about actions that we have more thoughts about ...
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How to dive into philosophy?

I'm a high school student with some basic knowledge of philosophy by far (I've taken an Intro to Philosophy course online, read Plato's Republic, some Camus, some Nietzsche and plenty of Marx), but ...
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152 views

Does our experience with habits lead us to believe in free will?

Notoriously intractable, free will have had no success in being proven physically. Even phenomenally it is difficult to pin down precisely. So why do people believe each other when claiming that they ...
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64 views

Confusion about the nature, defininition, and subject of study of Epistemology, Gnosiology and Phillosophy of Science

I am confused with the terms and the branches of phillosophy. Here is an example where all 3 terms were used. I always though phillosophy of science and epistemology were the exact same thing while ...
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Is it possible to make decisions without some kind of belief system? [closed]

Normally when we talk about belief, we mean religious beliefs. But even the criticizers of religions have some kind of belief system. They base all their decisions on the premise of logic. Thats why I ...
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Epistemology and definition of Theory in Science

Which branch of philosophy is the authority and thus has the capacity to define what IS theory in science? I have linked to the definition of Theory by Simon Blackburn in Oxford Dictionary of ...
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435 views

What is David Chalmers' Naturalistic dualism?

Can somebody explain to me exactly what David Chalmers' Naturalistic dualism is, because I have heard a lot of conflicting explanations on it?
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Why does Searle's room receive three batches of Chinese characters and two English instruction manuals as input?

Searle's Chinese room receives input in the form of a batch of chinese characters, then twice after receives a batch of Chinese. The second batch of Chinese comes with English instructions for "...
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According to physics, do our visual thoughts (possibly others) appear to be not real because they occupy physically inaccessible higher dimensions?

I wanted to know how physics explain the mind.I will first share my thoughts on whether thoughts are real or that the mind is real (Mind is the arena where we have thoughts). I think we usually ...
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On the Donald Davidson Discourse of Contradictory Beliefs

The following excerpt is taken from Donald Davidson, Problems of Rationality, Chapter 14, Who is Fooled (1997), page 217: We should not agree that believing the contradictory or the contrary of a ...
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Did Freud really suggest translating the manifest into the latent to interpret it?

Is the bold section of the following text correct about Freud's hypothesis? Does it mean to use the manifest dream thoughts in order to find the meaning of the latent ones? According to Derrida, ...
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Can we create a paradox of self-consciousness?

On the theme of Russell's paradox: Does the set of all sets that do not contain themselves contain itself? And the Barber's paradox: Does a barber who shaves all men who do not shave themselves ...
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Philosophy of concepts - can it be (gradually) expressed in type theory?

Reasoning in mathematics is simple and subject to automation and discipline/system, because every concept (e.g. integer number, real number, derivative, integral, differential equation and its ...
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Is the concept of Aporia the same as the Zen concept of A Beginners Mind?

Is the concept of Aporia the same as the zen concept of A Beginners Mind, or related to it, or a completely different concept?
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How does mediation inherent in the senses not refute Searle's “direct realism”?

In an answer to this question How to start Philosophy and find the branches that are related to my questions?, an article by Searle came up http://www.klemens.sav.sk/fiusav/doc/organon/prilohy/2012/2/...
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Ontological Foundations of Epistemology

A review of the SEP article of epistemology indicates that there are 5 sources of knowledge: perception, memory, introspection, reason, and testimony. Robert Audi in his Epistemology: A Contemporary ...
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Objective idealism and realism can be similar?

So, Hegel's objective idealism believes in manifestations of reason which is nothing but ideas. And which exists in this world is nothing but the ideas, everything is idea and idea is everything. ...
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Why jain philosophy denies indeterminate stage of perception?

Ok ,so I'm reading now Indian philosophy and I found that Buddhism and many other Indian philosophy recognise both ' determinate and indeterminate stage of perception ' while jainas don't !
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Is space experienced?

Space doesn't have a taste, a smell, a sound or a "shape". Anything we experience and think seem to require it. It doesn't have any experiential property whatsoever, but we still normally refer to it ...
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Which books do you recommend for me?

I read a lot about philosophy but it’s so huge that I stand confused. I am not sure which branch of philosophy suits me. I request your help. I don’t believe in god or spirituality. I want to live ...
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Is willful ignorance ethically acceptable? [closed]

Disclaimer: This is an open/opinion based question. Coming from StackOverflow something like this isn't looked fondly upon but I hope it's more commonly accepted practice over here. Also I am not a ...
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The experience of simultaneously holding very different interpretations of reality

Disclaimer: I am describing here something that's been my personal perception/interpretation/mode of being for many many years. I may not (probably don't) know the correct terminology, or whether this ...
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What makes things real?

Suppose that a person can't sense anything. He can't see, hear, feel. Nothing. So for him, does anything even exist? Does that mean only things we can sense are real or existent? Also, how would you ...
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Has any philosopher discussed pre-cognitive or pre-linguistic conceptualization?

To get an idea of what I'm talking about one may pay close attention to their own thought process. It may become evident that one can gain awareness of certain conceptual assemblages. If awareness at ...
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Fear of death is prior feature of human T or F

A group of people have the fear of death, another group of people do not, the group of people that do not have fear of death believe the consequence is to go to heaven. Part of the first group think ...
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Why is the concept of self-awareness important?

When we discuss whether something (an animal, a strong AI, a Boltzmann brain, etc) would have the kind of intelligence like a human, there are often materials saying whether they would be possibly ...
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In how far is experiencing other Consciousness' part of the Hard Problem of Consciousness?

To start with the easy problem of Consciousness - this is really more around the mechanics. It is asking about our scientific understanding of our neurological hardware and the processes thereon. It ...
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Putnam on computationalism

Just looking at this wikipedia article Putnam has claimed along lines similar to, but more general than Searle's arguments, that the question of whether the human mind can implement computational ...
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Authors on consciousness and its relation with suffering

Let's say we take a group of volunteers willing to receive a 120V discharge under fMRI scanners. They all may receive the same intensity but how can we know that they all recieve the same amount of ...
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What responses have been made to Churchland's claim that the Knowledge Argument is equivocal?

In "Knowing Qualia: A Reply to Jackson" [1], Paul Churchland reiterates his claim that Frank Jackson's Knowledge Argument [2] equivocates on the sense of "knows about". This claim, originally made in “...
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Poincare says we are born geometric or arithmetic thinkers. Which was Grothendieck and why?

Poincare proclaims that the mathematical continuum originates from the sensible intuition and that intuition by pure number or logic alone could not have given us this notion. Source for the claim: ...
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How to make sense of minds of others? [closed]

I've asked a question about the criteria for existence, but here I want to focus on a particular aspect. What does it mean If I say: Bob has a mind - Bob's mind exists - Bob is not a philosophical ...