Questions tagged [philosophy-of-science]

for applied philosophical questions about the study of science, the pursuit of scientific knowledge, and the scientific method

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What is the underlying critique Quine is making with his underdetermination thesis?

Quine considered his position to be a naturalistic one, and so not opposed to science as at least a good pragmatic form of knowledge. But I am unclear on the premise of his thesis of ...
BVinNV's user avatar
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How philosopher who claims that they not a p-zombie could be so confident that everyone else are not p-zombie?

There is exists an interesting concept of philosophical zombie. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philosophical_zombie To understand problem behind that concept, there is also interesting movie series ...
Dmytro Brazhnyk's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
306 views

Is Psychology a Science? And the Testability Principle

I have a simple question, I'm sure you're all shall love it. Do you think psychology is a science or it's just some sort of pseudoscience base on the philosophy of science? Do you also think that the ...
Saad Sameer's user avatar
-1 votes
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67 views

Exploring the Darwin-Einstein Theory of Relativistic Evolution: A Thought Trial [closed]

Thought experiments have their merit, but my cousin Dante says, "are they repeatable?" For example, there are models within models. It seems like such thought experiments could be scientific ...
Ronald J. Zallman's user avatar
4 votes
7 answers
340 views

Mutually contradictory but simultaneously correct

In continuation of Two competing theories that are logically inconsistent my second question is there can be a theory/framework which can be interpreted in many mutually contradictory but ...
quanity's user avatar
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11 votes
5 answers
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What are appropriate limits to good faith?

This is a question about normative theories in the philosophy of science and epistemology, I would like to know how I as a research scientist / mathematician should treat "cranks." I am not ...
Patrick Nicodemus's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
78 views

Are there any conserved properties in causation?

Physical objects do seem to operate on other physical objects while all operating under physical properties, i.e. chemical bonds, momentum, mass, energy, etc. A chemical reacts with other chemicals to ...
Wowser's user avatar
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3 answers
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Does paradoxes in a theory mean that the theory is incorrect and should be discarded?

I have two questions which relate to two different subjects, Science and Mathematics have different meanings of "theory", first is based on ever-growing scientific evidence while other is ...
Dheeraj Gujrathi's user avatar
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4 answers
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Is there any theory or postulate accepted in science that isn’t based on novel testable predictions?

I was watching a YouTube video of a guy named Tom Jump who summarizes his epistemology as “If a hypothesis can make new, testable predictions then that counts as evidence. Whichever hypothesis one has ...
Baby_philosopher's user avatar
3 votes
4 answers
982 views

What Would Be the state of philosophy of Science if There were no patterns in nature

Scientific observations so far have given us similarities and patterns almost in every field, Be it physics or chemistry, The second step of scientific method is to propose a hypothesis based on all ...
Dheeraj Gujrathi's user avatar
2 votes
10 answers
558 views

Does any philosophy define 'existence' such that unobservable things exist?

In Science and the Unobservable Nature (1937) it says An outstanding characteristic of modern physics is that only that which is observable is significant. ... the followers of Einstein maintained ...
Chris Degnen's user avatar
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Why were the founders of quantum mechanics idealists?

Max Planck, Schrodinger, Bohr, and other founders of quantum mechanics have all expressed an idealist or subjective idealist position: in other words, they believed reality is created by or dependent ...
edelex's user avatar
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4 answers
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What did Kant mean by "cognition" in the Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science?

"Every doctrine that is supposed to be a system, that is, a whole of cognition ordered according to principles, is called a science.". From second paragraph of the preface to the ...
Gerry's user avatar
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6 answers
621 views

What's the least amount of things that can possibly exist?

Suppose there only ever existed one indecomposable, irreducible object. What could distinguish it from nothingness? From not existing, as there is nothing besides it that could deduce its information? ...
Wowser's user avatar
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1 answer
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Does necessitarianism make the concept of law of nature vacuous?

I am someone who believes that everything is necessary, that only the actual is possible. However, I came across a somewhat disturbing implication of my view. I believe my view entails that every true ...
user107952's user avatar
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5 answers
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Could “synchronicities” be definitively explained? How so?

Synchronicities are almost eerie, uncanny everyday coincidences. We can assume that they are explainable by confirmation biases. I also like the concept of “cohesion”, where people actually exist in a ...
D J Sims's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
60 views

Is social constructionism a falsifiable theory of human nature?

According to Karl Popper, a theory must be falsifiable to be a scientific theory. How would a social scientist falsify the theory of social constructionism? I understand that there are many individual ...
Jude Zambarakji's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
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Two competing theories that are logically inconsistent

we say that they are competing because their logically contradictory if accept one of them we must reject the other.......to choose between them therefore we need to expand the scope of our ...
quanity's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
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A philosophy professor or philosopher-professor? [closed]

Reading this job description for the position of Assistant Professor in Philosophy at Cambridge, one of the key questions that comes to mind is: does an academic certification/position in philosophy ...
Ptah-hotep's user avatar
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1 answer
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Is our current explosive rate of technological progression because we do science faster and easier OR it is simply happening due to unknown timing?

I often wonder if we are progressing so quickly because we are much more capable than our 18th century natural philosophers ancestors at doing science or we are just living in a period of rapid growth ...
Max's user avatar
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4 votes
3 answers
287 views

Is there an objective in science that only has one method to accomplish it? [closed]

I sometimes look at various scientific processes and there always seems that most of the objectives we humans look for; have more than one means to achieve it. Heating something, cooling something off,...
Max's user avatar
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3 answers
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Is there a way to prove we live in a universe of infinite or finite “things”?

Sometimes I wonder if science has limits. On one hand; logically no; there will always be something that we don’t understand and when we create new things it leads to other new things. On the other ...
Max's user avatar
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10 answers
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Can science prove statements to be true?

I know that mathematics can prove certain statements to be true, which we call theorems. But what about science? Can science prove statements to be true? Note, just because a statement can't be proven ...
user107952's user avatar
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2 votes
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What would be a recent follow-up or alternative to Pylyshyn's 1984 book on "Computation and Cognition: Toward a Foundation for Cognitive Science"?

I was exposed to Zenon Pylyshyn's work through my master's thesis work in Cognitive Science. Recently, I picked up his 1984 book on "Computation and Cognition: Toward a Foundation for Cognitive ...
digikar's user avatar
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3 answers
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Can Occam's razor be used in favor of scientific arguments against philosophical arguments? [closed]

Occam’s razor is a principle often attributed to 14th–century friar William of Ockham that says that if you have two competing ideas to explain the same phenomenon, you should prefer the simpler one. ...
Wiseman's user avatar
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8 answers
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Is "explaining away" something without offering details ever justified? How detailed should an explanation be to be considered valid?

In a recent question I asked if it was epistemologically sound to consider alternative theories of consciousness to explain the visual phenomena that people blind from birth experience during a near-...
Mark's user avatar
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Main books on the relationship between religion and science

I have had the book "History of the Conflict between Religion and Science" by John Willian Draper for a while. I really liked certain sections of it highlighting the sharp contrast between ...
hlayhel's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
63 views

Can several logic systems coexist physically in the same world?

In mathematics, each logic system is associated with an abstract model. In physics, similarly, each logic system is associated with a physical model that models a part of the universe, but I don't ...
Sayaman's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
144 views

Are scientific laws examples of immaterial things having causal power?

A scientific law is clearly immaterial. It has no shape nor does it take the form of matter. It is also abstract. It is considered a mathematical description of the regularities we see in nature, but ...
thinkingman's user avatar
8 votes
4 answers
222 views

Scientific realism and the problem-solving approach to understanding science

On the one hand, scientific realism posits that scientific theories aim to describe reality, and that progress in science is marked by our theories providing a more and more accurate picture of what ...
Turtur's user avatar
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4 answers
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Is science fundamentally based on the binary testing of hypotheses? (according to the scientific method)

I'm intrigued by the conventional portrayal of the scientific method involving binary testing of hypotheses: accepted or rejected. Is this binary framework an inherent part of scientific inquiry, or ...
bananenheld's user avatar
2 votes
7 answers
141 views

Paradox of the Loving "I": Is there any theory to answer my Paradox?

I came up with this when I was reading about the Paradox of Fiction in one of my Aesthetic philosophy texts. Here it is: The Paradox of the Loving Individual: (1) One experiences themselves as a ...
The Nova Scotian Humanist's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
256 views

Metaphysical theories for why physics has the structure it has

The laws of physics have an extremely rich structure. The more fundamental you go, the more complex it becomes (e.g. Quantum Mechanics is more complex (no pun) than Newtonian mechanics). This ...
Ryder Rude's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
76 views

What is the most accurate and accepted philosophy of perception in 21st century?

The philosophy of perception is concerned with the nature of perceptual experience and the status of perceptual data, in particular how they relate to beliefs about, or knowledge of, the world. https:/...
Wiseman's user avatar
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1 answer
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Do Gödel's incompleteness theorems and Tarski's theorem of indefinability of truth show we can never discover and prove every truth?

I thought I had a grasp on this. Do Gödel's apply to just math; logic, too; or more, and what does its applicability entail? If it applies to math, does it apply to physics? Similarly with Tarski: can ...
Sayetsu's user avatar
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13 votes
18 answers
6k views

Is it "unscientific" to be sceptical without offering alternative explanations?

Alice has made some anecdotal observations. Through a process of elimination, she proposes a hypothesis to explain the phenomenon, as well as an experiment to validate (or otherwise) her hypothesis. ...
Xophmeister's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
4k views

Are we too quick to assume that the most recent evidence is inevitably the strongest?

In what contexts is this true and in what contexts can this be considered true and vice versa? Personally, I think it has a lot to do with confirmation bias, especially in natural sciences where for ...
OBAMIUM's user avatar
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1 vote
6 answers
126 views

Does Multi-World Interpretation really eliminate randomness in quantum mechanics?

As I understood it, the Multi World Interpretation (MWI) was meant to avoid the problem of resorting to randomness, by replacing the random wavefunction collapse in Copenhagen Interpretation with ...
Lukewarm_cocoa's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
62 views

What is the relation between idealism and science?

My understanding of idealism is that it rests on the primacy of the mind and conscience over matter. The Encyclopædia Britannica provides the following "basic" forms of idealism: The two ...
frankhey's user avatar
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0 answers
64 views

Are the mass ,diameter and age of the Universe absolute quantities?

Mass of the observable Universe is known to be 1.50×10^53 kg. Age is approximately known to be 13.7 billion years. Universe is a sphere with diameter 8.8X 10^26 m. Mass,Length intervals and Time ...
Dheeraj Verma's user avatar
1 vote
6 answers
166 views

Are atomic particles abstract objects?

By "atomic particle", I mean everything from molecules to quarks---objects that are outside the realm of normal experience but used in physics and chemistry to explain macroscopic events. By ...
David Gudeman's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
91 views

Is it theoretically possible to create Universe in the lab? [closed]

If the universe took birth without the help of consciousness then is it theoretically possible to create a Universe in the lab ? If yes , how is this created Universe will be different from multiverse ...
Dheeraj Verma's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
66 views

What does Hume think about Occam's razor?

Let's define Occam's razor as this: That it is not rational to believe something unnecessary or extra about reality without a specific reason to believe it. In other words, the facts that are ...
BigMistake's user avatar
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1 answer
53 views

Does Hume propose that causes might actually just be explained by coincidence?

Does Hume propose that what people interpret as casual connections could instead be explained by coincidence? I want to know if this is an accurate understanding. Hume says something to the effect of: ...
BigMistake's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
47 views

Hume says we can't determine a causal connections between objects. Why separate the system into objects at all?

A summary of Hume's perspective is as follows: When we reason about matters of fact to reach new conclusions, we use cause and effect: when a dropped ball hits the ground (observation), it bounces (...
BigMistake's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
69 views

Does the unobserved past exist in a super position

Does the unobserved past exist in a super position in the sense of quantum mechanics? Has anyone seen this question asked before? If the question is meaningful, what answer seems most likely. If the ...
John Diller's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
248 views

Does knowledge of the scientific context aid consideration of philosophical questions?

Some fundamental philosophical questions are posed in the context of quantum physics. Does knowledge of the science aid consideration of these questions? Should the scientific background be explained ...
Meanach's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
75 views

Does the possibility of incommensurable degrees of explanatory complexity hypothetically undermine appeals to Occam's razor?

There is an SEP article on the proposed incommensurability of at least some conflicting pairs of scientific theories, which goes over Kuhnian and Feyerabendian proposals regarding this ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
95 views

Is necessary existence a property?

If existence is not a property then doesn't it follow that necessary existence is also not a property? If it is then why?
Vihan 's user avatar
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1 vote
7 answers
2k views

Are we lost in the details?

A hypothesis. https://theworld.org/stories/2021-05-20/imagining-gaia-earth-one-great-living-organism Simply put, the Gaia hypothesis says that Earth is a living system and uses similar mechanisms that ...
Ioannis Paizis's user avatar

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