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Questions tagged [philosophy-of-science]

for applied philosophical questions about the study of science, the pursuit of scientific knowledge, and the scientific method

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Should only philosophy students study logic, ethics, axiology, phenomenology, epistemology, and aesthetics? [on hold]

E.g a physician. Should they not start in any univeristy studying these modules? Actually a lawyer most law schools teach philosophy of law as an elective module. And no social philosophy or ...
0
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1answer
29 views

A physical thing to see [on hold]

Let's say people see round things. Other people from another dimension see square. The question is about physicality when touched, we know what shape it has. whether something can have a different ...
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3answers
112 views

Is fallibilism a better option than absolute certainty?

Fallibilism is the epistemological thesis that no belief (theory, view, thesis, and so on) can ever be rationally supported or justified in a conclusive way. Always, there remains a possible doubt as ...
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9answers
1k views

Is a proof still valid if only the author understands it?

Some time ago I was reading about the recent Shinichi Mochizuki's proof for the famous ABC conjecture. It's enormous and so incredibly difficult that at that time virtually nobody was able to ...
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1answer
64 views

Why subjective probability cannot explain probability in Quantum Mechanics?

Is there a subjectivist account of probability that is able to explain probability in QM or at least in deterministic interpretations of QM?
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0answers
69 views

Probability calculus and Quantum Mechanics

I am not an expert and probably this question highlights this. Anyway, is the probability calculus used in Quantum Mechanics? Does the concept of probability adopted in Quantum Mechanics satisfy the ...
0
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0answers
71 views

Distributions of outcomes in Quantum Mechanics

I have read an answer here about the probabilistic nature of QM and I am curious about why QM is able to predict only distributions of outcomes of an experiment. To be clearer, is QM’s inability of ...
53
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25answers
7k views

Why is there something instead of nothing?

A simple but fundamental question. The "something" means the whole Universe (known and unknown), it could be represented as the reality version of the set of all sets, which is itself debated. It ...
3
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3answers
154 views

The tree of knowledge

A group of scientists come into a hostel and start studying people's behaviour. They create subgroups sorting by countries, jobs, habits, and so on; build models to predict whether someone is up to ...
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2answers
87 views

Does linguistic idealism imply scientific anti-realism, and are any existentialists committed to anti-realism for that reason?

Does linguistic idealism imply scientific anti-realism? By scientific anti-realism I mean the opinion that the unobservable world we study with science is not real, not mind independent. By ...
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1answer
72 views

What justified consciousness is an experience and not an thing? [closed]

No philosophers has justified that consciousnesses can be measured. Many philosophers have tried to describe the mind, but are there any specific scholars who describe justified methods to describe ...
9
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4answers
2k views

What does this Jacques Hadamard quote mean?

What does this Jacques Hadamard quote mean? The shortest path between two truths in the real domain passes through the complex domain. Is this a philosophical statement? what is its mathematical ...
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1answer
72 views

What is Wittgenstein referring to in 4.113

Philosophy limits the disputable sphere of natural science Does this refer to the demarcation problem (what is natural science) or occam's razor (what is the best explanation)? Or is it meant ...
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2answers
60 views

Does natural science assume indirect realism?

The wiki on Direct and Indirect Realism seems to claim that indirect realism is part of natural science. The wiki defines indirect realism as follows: indirect or representative realism [is] the ...
3
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4answers
235 views

Could we develop a notion of conceivability that would allow us to imagine impossible/inconsistent/illogical things?

There are things that we cannot imagine because they are impossible (like a solution to Russell's set theory, since it is impossible to reach that solution because it is illogical.) Some months ago, ...
4
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3answers
836 views

Why are Popper's basic statements not justifiable by experience?

In his Logik der Forschung Popper writes that basic statements are not justifiable by our immediate experiences, but are … accepted by an act, a free decision (LSD, 109) The SEP entry on Popper ...
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6answers
639 views

Has the Problem of Induction been solved?

The problem as to acquiring knowledge about times where we cannot experiment/observe. For e.g, you haven't seen the future, so you cannot make any definitive statements, or rather, scientifically ...
2
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2answers
115 views

Is skepticism a contentious issue? [closed]

I haven’t thought much about the application of the idea ‘skepticism’ since the first year of my philosophy program, because it had already been sorted out to my satisfaction and the satisfaction of ...
2
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3answers
259 views

Epistemology of “Creationism Debate”

Epistemologically, is there any difference between a belief in non-interventionist evolution and a belief in young-earth creationism? If so, what is it? I'm not interested in the question of whether ...
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0answers
49 views

How is justification related to truth?

We all learned to believe in true belief; some of us don’t anymore. I’ve found that better ideas are available to us if we don’t. Some ideas are better (better justified by evidence and logic) than ...
3
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4answers
123 views

What's the role of certainty in discussions about philosophical positions?

Karl Popper was one of the twentieth century’s preeminent philosophers of science. He was an avowed realist who was dedicated to the correspondence theory of truth. In his seventh decade of life, ...
3
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1answer
49 views

Ontology of space/time

Are space and/or time considered abstract objects or concrete objects? They seem causally inert yet more real than the typical abstract objects we think of.
0
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1answer
134 views

Why Quantum Mechanics states that nature is probabilistic? [duplicate]

I am new here and I am studying the philosophical implications of Quantum Mechanics. I read somewhere that QM and determinism are mutually exclusive and that QM involve a number of philosophers to ...
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6answers
6k views

Falsification in Math vs Science

In the beginning it was thought that the statement 1+1=0 is false, and necessarily so. However, with the birth of modular arithmetic, it was found that indeed, 1+1 does indeed equal to 0 (in the mod 2 ...
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1answer
115 views

How should “knowledgeability” be defined? Is it merely w.r.t. to best scientific knowledge? [closed]

How should "knowledgeability" be defined? Is it merely w.r.t. to best scientific knowledge? What about things that science cannot measure? Or are there other "reasonable" forms of knowledge? Why ...
5
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3answers
135 views

Does the idea of falsification assume the existence of an objective reality?

In order to falsify a hypothesis, an observation must be compared to some statement of fact that would be true if the hypothesis were true. The unspoken assumption seems to be that the observation, ...
3
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1answer
98 views

Is there a world behind you when you do not look behind your back? [closed]

There is a very famous philosophical question that almost all of us have heard before: If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound? My question is a little ...
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4answers
154 views

Does evolution always entail progress?

It was Darwin who first introduced the concept of Evolution in his Evolution Theory. However, whenever he and in general people speak about Evolution, I always have the feeling that they connote it ...
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18answers
6k views

What is the purpose of the universe?

There are two extremes known as creationism vs evolutionism. Let's consider creationism for a moment, and imagine that God exists, and he/she has created us. The question that obsesses my mind after ...
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7answers
437 views

Does science provide the most accurate depiction of reality for analyzing and describing an accurate worldview?

I've been fighting throughout my philosophical reading with the question of the necessity of science as the only permitted view we (since the late 19th century) have on the world. My question might ...
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2answers
63 views

Accuracy vs. Understanding In Science

Suppose I have a theory A that can predict all experimental outcomes, E, in a particular domain of interest almost exactly. Now suppose later a second theory is developed B that cannot predict ...
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0answers
49 views

What were Hegel's criticisms of Newton?

I recently read this thread THREAD describing the relationship between Hegel and Newton. Apparently, Hegel misread Newton's principia, and criticized a specific point of science on Newton. This is ...
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0answers
124 views

Which kinds of academic revolutions has philosophy of science indentified so far and when?

Recently, I had an interdisciplinary discussion with some friends about Industry 4.0, internet of things,...which brought up the question, which kind of academic revolutions apart from industrial ...
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0answers
52 views

Why do there exist “logical fallacies” that are not really consistent logical fallacies?

Why do there exist "logical fallacies" that are not really consistent logical fallacies? By logical fallacy, consider e.g. ad hominem. By consistent logical fallacy I refer to a type of logical ...
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1answer
58 views

Could generalization of scientific theories be possible by just adding an ad hoc hypothesis?

In a seventeenth century world the Newtonian model did mostly very well to describe how gravity works in the universe and did well with most empirical evidence of that time. Of course now we know that ...
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2answers
250 views

Are the “laws” of deductive logic empirically verifiable?

"Is Logic Empirical?" strongly suggests a question that I would like very much to get a handle on. That phrase is a title of an article by Hilary Putnam, and, according to synopses/reviews, the ...
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2answers
63 views

Is “Societal Science” impossible?

Is "Societal Science" impossible? Social science one can understand as dealing with more concrete groups, but to suggest that someone can study and predict societies sounds absurd. Also, it seems ...
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2answers
66 views

Is the idea of potential energy (from physics) influenced by the idea of potentiality found in Aristotelian metaphysics?

Aside from the common usage of the term 'potential,' was the development of the idea of potential energy influenced by the Aristotelian idea of potentiality and actuality, at least historically? ...
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1answer
169 views

Do we consider all parameters when we deal the term, 'SCIENTIFIC'? [closed]

There are different sciences and different definitions to 'science'. But there must be some commonness when we use the term--'SCIENTIFIC'. Since it is supposed that almost all sciences are seeking ...
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3answers
163 views

Are we seeing useless physics today [closed]

Are we seeing useless physics today? By useless physics I refer to for example the study of multiverse(s): it is useless because there is no use for it to mankind - except that there are physicists ...
5
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1answer
209 views

Thomas Kuhn's “paradigm” and its 22 different uses

Thomas S. Kuhn, both in his Second Thoughts on Paradigms [1971] and in the Postscript to the second edition of The Structure of Scientific Revolutions [1970], refers to someone who found 22 different ...
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2answers
57 views

Explaining the Termination Risk of Simulation Technologies

There is a recent article in Erkenntnis that discusses termination risks related to the simulation hypothesis [1]. That is, if we are living in a computer simulation, are there risks that might ...
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8answers
1k views

Do transfinite sets have practical applications?

This may not qualify as a philosophy question exactly, but I would argue that potential applications of pure mathematics are in the bounds of philosophical interest. Many innovations in pure ...
5
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1answer
298 views

What is the relevance of applicability to the natural sciences in pure mathematics?

I think I am coming to a good, new understanding of the relationship of pure mathematics to the natural sciences. A major concern of mine is just how reliable is rigorous (characteristically "pure") ...
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6answers
133 views

Can a theory that is now wrong be right in the future?

For example we take as granted that energy is conserved (Energy conservation Principle). Imagine someone “build” a theory where the energy conservation doesnt apply. Scientific community should reject ...
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7answers
9k views

Do good explanations have to be true?

Is it so that whenever one gives an explanation to a question starting from 'why' or 'how' the explanation that we receive in return always is true in nature? From one perspective, an explanation is ...
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4answers
130 views

Would philosophy still exist if there was no life? [closed]

Would philosophy still exist without life? For example, for us humans, philosophy answers big questions and sort of governs society. But is philosophy something that would exist without life? On this ...
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1answer
59 views

Are paradigms still the driving force of scientific revolution?

I read long time ago about Kuhn's The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. Kuhn's demonstrate that scientific paradigms are the driving force that makes science go on, but more for social reasons than ...
0
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1answer
180 views

Can our universe be a pocket in a bigger unseen eternal universe?

Taking time as a fourth dimension is due to Einstein because of the speed of light being fixed. But why should such a finding have so important consequence on our philosophical contemplation of ...
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2answers
156 views

Causality: is it possible for one attribute to be found in one node but not the others before it?

This is a rather basic question about causality, but I'm a bit confused over it (especially in terms of the "first cause" argument). Causality (from Wikipedia): Agency or efficacy that connects ...