Questions tagged [philosophy-of-science]

for applied philosophical questions about the study of science, the pursuit of scientific knowledge, and the scientific method

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14
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7answers
5k views

Does every truth have to be provable based on evidence?

I know the answer is "no" in general due to Gödel's Theory of Incompleteness, but I mean this question in a more real-world sense (i.e. scientific sense). In other words, I am talking about empirical ...
-1
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2answers
89 views

Epistemology and definition of Theory in Science

Which branch of philosophy is the authority and thus has the capacity to define what IS theory in science? I have linked to the definition of Theory by Simon Blackburn in Oxford Dictionary of ...
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9answers
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Does Popper's theory of falsification apply to mathematics?

Mathematics is generally & popularly judged a science in the basic duality: science - humanities. As enemies and collaborationists. The border heavily & fiercely policed. However, it seems to ...
-1
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1answer
178 views

Ur-primitive notions of logic and mathematics and especially Ur-primitive notions of objective existence of abstract entities [closed]

I am very puzzled about how mathematics came to be as it is in its modern form, where it is extremely embellished to depend on formal rules of logical inference and on the notion of axiomatic ...
9
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1answer
464 views

What is the Anti-Realist and Constructionist interpretation of empirical dating methods and existence of the past?

I'm fairly interested in the realism, anti-realism debate and would like to hear, if possible by an anti-realist or constructivist, how dating methods fit into their world view. As a realist, dating ...
0
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3answers
302 views

How do philosophers believe there is no present, past and future?

Nor does 20th (21st) -century physics countenance the idea that there is anything ontologically special about the past, as opposed to the present and the future. In fact, it fails to use these ...
7
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5answers
408 views

Are the “laws” of deductive logic empirically verifiable?

"Is Logic Empirical?" strongly suggests a question that I would like very much to get a handle on. That phrase is a title of an article by Hilary Putnam, and, according to synopses/reviews, the ...
4
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3answers
156 views

Understanding Kant vs. Hume for a non-philosopher

I am trying to self-study a bit of philosophy. I am an applied mathematician by trade, and am therefore drawn to Kant's work on the limits of human knowledge, in particular his exchange with Hume. I ...
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5answers
216 views

Has science ever disproved philosophical theories?

I am aware that science and philosophy, in their modern guise, are two separate beasts that never cross the same domains but sometimes it happens that philosophy influences science and that science ...
3
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1answer
295 views

Determinism vs Indeterminism debate

I need to find an article/website/book which offers a brief survey of the dispute determinism vs indeterminism (with no or really few references to the free-will problem). I need them for a high ...
0
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2answers
86 views

Leo Strauss' Critique of Modern Science

I recently read Leo Strauss's views on modern science, as expanded in Alan Bloom's "The Closing of the American Mind". In a (very small) nutshell, Strauss had the extraordinary idea that modern ...
0
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3answers
170 views

How to reconcile that physicists and science educators use the word “theory” incompatibly?

When science denialists say "just a theory", they are roundly chastised. Science educators (teachers, reporters, essayists, etc) are united that the word theory has a strong requirement: Berkeley: "a ...
6
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2answers
578 views

What is the difference between 'accidental' and 'contingent'?

What is different between 'accidental' and 'contingent'? I thought that accidental contains intentional notation while Contingent does not. But there could be an intentional action that turns out to ...
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2answers
94 views

Please help with clarifying whether a science assumes the following axiom

It seems to me that the goal of science is to describe with the most precision the world we perceive through our senses. It seems to me that actually science has an axiom: There exists some final ...
0
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4answers
77 views

When writing scientific papers Why there is not a standard to declare all the things based on which a person will argue?

Lets say I am a scientists and I want to write a scientific paper about some matter of a physics for example. In that paper I would say for example that the universe is expanding (or some other well ...
-1
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1answer
42 views

Boltzmann brain - how are the laws of physics presented?

Does the Boltzmann brain scenario also assume that the laws of physics are presented consistently for each individual brain? In other words: 1) Why do we assume that the types of brains fluctuated ...
-1
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1answer
320 views

Noam Chomsky vs 9/11 Truth movement. Is Noam's Logic legit?

When Noam Chomsky was asked about what he thought about the collapse of building 7 at the University of Florida in 2013, he replied that only a minuscule part of the scientific community backed up the ...
2
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4answers
2k views

What exactly is the CTMU?

http://www.ctmu.org/ So recently I read about this guy with a really high IQ, Chris Langan, who crafted an ultimate theory of reality - CTMU, Cognitive-Theoretical Model of the Universe - which he ...
6
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5answers
246 views

Is mathematics a mental idea?

Is mathematics a mental idea? According to this answer, a mental idea cannot exist without a mind. If mathematics is a mental idea, what does this imply about the laws of physics which can be ...
1
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2answers
51 views

What is Quine’s Confirmation theory?

I have just read that Quine relies on his confirmation theory to establish if a scientific theory is “valid” or not. But I am not sure to have understood what is Quine’s confirmation theory and why ...
2
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3answers
121 views

What kind of questions can science answer?

Please bear with me, as I am self-studying philosophy as a beginner. My questions are about the limitations of empirical science. During my reading of some books, I've come across statements of the ...
2
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4answers
366 views

Can death be given meaning through the theory of evolution?

Disclaimer: I haven't seen any other posts about this anywhere and one night, I was just thinking and scribbled this down, so I don't know where this could be found otherwise. What if, there is no ...
1
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1answer
93 views

Language and Sociology [closed]

Could someone systematically, methodologically, organisedly research Sociology, Civilisation, Culture through Language? I.e The state of Language would be the observation and one would give a ...
8
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3answers
3k views

Does Darwin owe a debt to Hegel?

I just realized that Darwin's theory of evolution is very much historicist, and resembles Hegel's notion of an arc of history: evolution is progressive and moves with purpose in an almost dialectical ...
3
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2answers
46 views

What is the difference between instrumentalism and operationalism?

The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy has the following definitions for these two perspectives on science: Instrumentalism: "the view that theories are merely instruments for predicting ...
2
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5answers
214 views

Does the existence of an infinite multi-verse constitute “grounding of scientific law”?

I'm taking a modern philosophy class and my teacher has talked about the a lot about the grounding of scientific law as well as whether it is necessary or contingent. For example, Descartes used his "...
3
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2answers
195 views

Would truly random events be strictly equivalent to events without a cause?

There are a couple of questions (one, another) about this topic, and as I was thinking about this for a while, I started wondering whether there has been any systematic research into this that raises ...
4
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4answers
412 views

How should science approach non-empirical phenomena?

I am not talking about miracles, religious revelation, or artistic expression, but something more mundane. There is a lot of "empirical" evidence that the Riemann hypothesis is true, the scare quotes ...
1
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1answer
46 views

Is there any correlation between Quine’s underdetermination and bayesian issues of old evidence and new theories?

Bayesianism has some faults some of them are the problem of old evidence and the issue of new theories. Are these two problems linked to Quine’s underdetermination? Or are they contrasting it? What is ...
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0answers
27 views

Why jain philosophy denies indeterminate stage of perception?

Ok ,so I'm reading now Indian philosophy and I found that Buddhism and many other Indian philosophy recognise both ' determinate and indeterminate stage of perception ' while jainas don't !
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3answers
85 views

Books on the logic of science

I was recently skimming through Nagels "The Structure of Science", and I wonder if there are other books that go through the philosophy of science through a logical point of view; That is, I am ...
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4answers
261 views

Is it true that we are almost certainly Boltzmann Brains?

I read an article and I got curious about the topic of Boltzmann Brains. I read some more articles and posts about the topic and it seems to me that the arguments are that BBs would outnumber us by ...
49
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16answers
42k views

In which way does quantum mechanics disprove determinism?

I've heard this pop up in a discussion with my physicist/engineer roommates, but didn't care to ask at the time. Now I'm mighty curious about it. Wikipedia doesn't really seem to say much on this ...
2
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1answer
151 views

AGI and Quine's conundrums:underdetermination and holism

How has [or will] the prevalence of “big data” – the exploding plethora of information and computing power to classify, categorize and correlate it, combined with Artificial General Intelligence, or ...
2
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3answers
172 views

Can Zenos paradox of motion be applied to a flashing blue light?

Zenos paradoxes of motion generally refer to actual motion through space; however for Aristotle this is motion in only one sense; an other sense could be alteration, for example change in shape and so ...
0
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2answers
78 views

Single theory in the natural sciences

I understand why in natural sciences multiple theories are required to have a better understanding of the natural world. Such as in physics to understand schrodingers wave function we need wave ...
0
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2answers
65 views

How are geometry and space related? [closed]

How are geometry and space related? I am asking in what type of relationship are "space" and "geometry". I can think of the relationship "necessity", but it's a very general relationship. I can't ...
1
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3answers
100 views

What is the relation between the propensity interpretation of probability and probability in physics?

I would like to know what physicists think about the propensity viewpoint.If this latter one is in line with physics and especially Quantum Mechanics. Otherwise, what is the most coherent ...
2
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2answers
109 views

Must an analysis of Being precede the positive sciences?

In the first few pages of Being and Time Heidegger writes: such an inquiry [into foundations]... still needs a guideline... it remains naive and opaque if... it leaves the meaning of being in ...
1
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2answers
256 views

Is philosophy a science and can it prove facts like science?

I would like to know whether philosophy can be treated as science since both science and philosophy search for truth, but philosophical theories, I think, are not provable. So my question is: ...
0
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1answer
49 views

What are the main sources of the social constructivist view in the philosophy of science?

What are the main sources of the social constructivist view in the philosophy of science? I am looking for the main books that introduce or develop this view of science.
34
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16answers
15k views

Fundamental idea on proving God's existence with science

I think that proving God's existence or any deity from any culture with the rigors of science is fundamentally absurd. The popular arguments usually involve space-time and the big bang theory. (I ...
0
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1answer
108 views

Has there been any philosophical guidance regarding when to use logic vs empirical testing?

One obvious disadvantage of testing a given claim with scientific constraints is that one may never know the number of possible constraints to try, in which combinations, and in which order to modify ...
1
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2answers
138 views

Does linguistic idealism imply scientific anti-realism, and are any existentialists committed to anti-realism for that reason?

Does linguistic idealism imply scientific anti-realism? By scientific anti-realism I mean the opinion that the unobservable world we study with science is not real, not mind independent. By ...
2
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1answer
333 views

What is the relevance of applicability to the natural sciences in pure mathematics?

I think I am coming to a good, new understanding of the relationship of pure mathematics to the natural sciences. A major concern of mine is just how reliable is rigorous (characteristically "pure") ...
1
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1answer
78 views

What is pseudoscience? How is it different from non-science? [closed]

*** I searched the question here in Stack Exchange and it wasn't reasonable
4
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3answers
993 views

Authors on the Credibility and Corruption of Modern Science

During the Renaissance and Industrial eras science was a way to remove superstition, religious misconception, and irrational fears. The scientific method was proved to be valid and available to ...
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4answers
2k views

A Popper question about corroboration

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Problem_of_induction#Karl_Popper The rational motivation for choosing a well-corroborated theory is that it is simply easier to falsify: Well-corroborated means ...
4
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10answers
1k views

Shouldn't fallibilism be a reason to abandon science?

The Wikipedia page on Fallibilism (currently) makes the intriguing claim that "Fallibilism is related to Pyrrhonistic Skepticism, in that Pyrrhonists of history are sometimes referred to as ...
0
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1answer
119 views

Differences and similarities between Kuhn and Quine about the indeterminacy of translation

About Thomas Kuhn's semantic incommensurability: Early on Kuhn drew a parallel with Quine's thesis of the indeterminacy of translation (1970a, 202; 1970c, 268). According to the latter, if we are ...