Questions tagged [philosophy-of-science]

for applied philosophical questions about the study of science, the pursuit of scientific knowledge, and the scientific method

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45 views

About the advantages of the propensity perspective on probability

I am wandering what are the advantages of the propensity perspective on probability. Why would it be better to explain probability in physics? Except for the fact that it solves various problems of ...
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64 views

What approach, choosing from Barnes and Bloor from SSK, or Kitcher from ESK, best described current practices in economics

Can someone help me with this question, because I can't get the answer myself, would like to start a discussion as well. SSK is the sociology of scientific knowledge and ESK is the economics of ...
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43 views

What difference is there between scientifically testable premises and personal biases that are tested? [closed]

What difference is there between scientifically testable premises and personal biases that are tested? That's, when is it possible to do scientific probing that is not somehow subjectively-oriented? ...
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60 views

Does a level I multiverse implicate a very long life? [closed]

Let's suppose that there are infinite level 1 universes, agreeing with physicist like Max Tegmark and even before them with philosophers like Giordano Bruno. Now, please follow this thought ...
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43 views

Would Popper have argued that a coin toss is indeterministic?

I know that Popper was an adovcate of the propensity theory of probability, i.e. probabilities are understood as properties of sets of generating conditions. Furthermore I (think) I have read that ...
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26 views

What does Latour mean by (-/non/post/)modernism?

There is a summary on wikipedia of We Have Never Been Modern which says Latour viewed modernism as an era that believed it had annulled the entire past in its wake.[29] He presented the antimodern ...
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46 views

Foucault and scientific revolutions

In the famous debate between Foucault and Chomsky (link), Foucault argues that there is no human nature really because, among other things, a scientific revolution in some science is just a revolution ...
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4answers
118 views

Why do we think objects and beings are real? [closed]

How can we tell if we are real and not a simulation that we perceive to be real. Given we know not what the universe is except what we perceive it to be. What if galaxies are just but other ...
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24 views

What is the Lange's viewpoint on laws of nature?

I am just wondering what is the Lange's philosophical perspective on laws of nature and what line of thought he follows in the contemporary debate.
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34 views

Is there such thing as “random” when it comes to expressionism? [closed]

I am wondering if there is such a thing as "random" when it comes to expressionism. Your brain decides things even before you've realized it. For example, if you pick something up, a fraction of a ...
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33 views

What hisorical time period does Kuhn's “pre-paradigm state” correspond?

In Thomas Kuhn's analysis of scientific development, in The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, the "pre-paradigm state" is a condition in which all members of the scientific community practice ...
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243 views

How can I apply logical positivism in the philosophy of education?

How can I apply logical positivism in the philosophy of education? How would I use logical positivism to explore why teachers teach (objectives), what should be taught (curriculum) and how should ...
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44 views

Philosophy of Science and the nature of observation: what counts as 'observable'?

In the realist-antirealist debate within philosophy of science, the distinction between the 'observable' and 'unobservable' is made very often though I have seen that this distinction is also ...
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68 views

What is uncomfortable science (Tukey 1954)?

I came across the term "uncomfortable science" on Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uncomfortable_science) where it is defined: Situations where the same data is used for model development (...
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31 views

Any book/article that talks about a difference in what science achieves and what society wants/needs?

I'm not trying to ignite a discussion on the topic, simply a reading reference for someone who talks about any difference between the academia and society - for example I've seen a book (published ...
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3answers
184 views

Proofs in math and physics

Suppose we have the case of a proof in math or physics and we want to compare the status of the derived information. I know that in math mostly all derived information or deduced details are a priori. ...
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61 views

Kuhn's incommensurability of scientific theory

Kuhn's view of the development of scientific theory has it that changes in paradigms mean that a scientist cannot compare paradigms with one another to determine which one is objectively better since ...
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27 views

Models of explanations and their conditions

Carl Hempel's idea of explanation (D.N. model) in the sciences is that you should be able to make some deductive argument by which the fact you're trying to explain is the conclusion. I.e. you form an ...
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1answer
187 views

The Hard Problem of Consciousness and Wave Function Collapse [closed]

Philosophers and physicists have been throwing around the idea that "consciousness causes collapse" since the early days of QM. Today most physicists reject this idea, but it seems to me this is ...
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56 views

Swinburne's solution to Grue

In the new riddle of induction, Swinburne proposes the idea that there is a genuine distinction to be made between the predicate 'green' and the predicate 'grue' in that 'green' is a qualitative ...
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112 views

William James on mathematical conceptions not related to perceptions?

I'm studying William James. I'm mainly interested in his Radical Empiricism and Pluralism. I really like his views but I need some clarification on what is his position on conceptions that are not ...
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120 views

On the explanation of facts

As a chemist, I have some philosophical doubts about explanation of facts. Short intro In Bertrand Russell's book 'History of Western Philosophy' he says that leading-to scientific knowledge is the '...
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38 views

Does anyone say that mind/brain type identity theory is just vacuous without scientific evidence that some part brain state is always the exact same?

Does anyone say that mind/brain type identity theory is just vacuous without scientific evidence that some part brain state is always the exact same experience? I think that's what type identity ...
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46 views

The line between science and philosophy - current status

(I know some will reject the idea of having a "line" between science and philosophy, but I don't want these answers, let's assume there is.) We often draw a line between science and philosophy that ...
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57 views

Have phenomenology influenced much of our contemporary science?

I'm reading the phenomenology page on IEP, which talks about the relation between phenomenology and science, and I must say, not that I haven't met with phenomenology before, but as it's presented on ...
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95 views

Is there any supporter of Michael Polanyi's criticism of scientific objectivism?

I just found out about Michael Polanyi and his ideas fascinate me. One of those, is his criticism of objectivism in science, which he historically links to Galileo. Historically, he mainly goes ...
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1answer
44 views

Can any piece of knowledge be produced without depending on another piece of knowledge? [closed]

In the case of sciences, for example, can the birth of a new branch of science be considered as utterly "new"?
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55 views

Do physical models of physical theories give a good picture of reality?

There are various physical models to make visible how a theory works, for example: Falaco solitons, see also here, where it is said that the swimming pool model corresponds to black holes and cosmic ...
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102 views

What are counters of the anthropic principle

The anthropic principle states that observations of the Universe must be compatible with the conscious and sapient life that observes it. Some people say that it explains why this universe has the age ...
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1answer
116 views

Knowing whether a discipline is science or philosophy [duplicate]

There are certainly no clear boundaries within science and philosophy. Science is about knowledge of nature, hypothesis, tests and repetition, and philosophy is about knowledge generated purely by ...
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38 views

Further reading on a unique aspect of scientific paradigms

In the Structure of Scientific Revolutions Kuhn makes an off-hand remark that it seems like, in science, paradigms achieve a near-universal acceptance that rarely happens in non-scientific fields. ...
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78 views

Is the fine-structure constant a physical number? [closed]

What distinguishes physical constants from mathematical ones, and can we assume both types of constants are numbers (hopefully yes)? A physical number is a number that is empirical.
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93 views

What makes the artificial in AI?

(I'm aware this is a duplicate of a closed thing, I have different questions) 'Artifice', so with a purpose. But didn't the eye evolve dependent on observation of external conditions, with selection ...
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69 views

Downward causation and unpredictable pattern formation in cellular automata [closed]

In Cellular Automatas , like game of life, different preliminary conditions will produce different pattern, that are unpredictable. Some of these large complex structures can effect on the internal ...
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40 views

history of philosophy side-by-side with science and art

Do you know any books which study the history of western philosophy side-by-side with: history of mathematics, or history of physics, or history of art?
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63 views

Is it conceivable that numeric calculations may lead to the discovery of future new facts and technologies? [closed]

Does any work in philosophy reflect the idea that future technological advances based on calculations will lead to the discovery of new facts about the world? Is there a connection between the ideas ...
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56 views

Were people less likely to get lung cancer from smoking in the 1920s, 30s, 40s, and 50s? [closed]

Since people did not know smoking was bad for you until about 1972 I am wondering in the decades where they didn't know it was bad since people didn't know it was bad for them would they be less ...
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87 views

How do we define a fact?

Got into a discussion today with my Semiotics professor regarding this question and I still had questions in my head on the way home. He was stuck on the notion that facts have just become things ...
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3answers
173 views

What inference mechanisms are used for justification in mathematics?

I am aware of two major modes of reasoning used for justification of belief: deductive and inductive. Whereas physics relies on induction, mathematics seems to rely exclusively on deductive inference, ...
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34 views

Can ecology be used to determine our scientific biases? [closed]

The faculties of the nervous system are evolved. Therefore they depend on environmental pressure. Assuming we can only understand our environment to the extend that our evolved faculties allow us, is ...
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2answers
229 views

Probable and improbable theory

"In the view of many social scientists, the more probable a theory is, the better it is, and if we have to choose between two theories which are equally strong in terms of their explanatory power, ...
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108 views

Are there any contemporary continental studies based on linking the philosophy of language to science?

I guess verificationism may be a philosophy of language: the idea that to know the meaning of a scientific proposition... is to know what would be evidence for that proposition Are there more ...
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1answer
263 views

Are these two statements about Ramseyfication true? [closed]

They just seem intuitively likely, though I'm not feeling very au fait with what exactly Ramsey sentences are. The Ramseyfication of everything that is necessarily true in a linguistic system leaves ...
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2answers
73 views

Are language, context and truth connected?

I have been thinking about the following problem for years and can't seem to resolve it. I'm looking for more information on the subject and would really appreciate some further reading on the ...
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21 views

Is it possible to adopt the interpretivism philosophy of science when conducting a deductive study?

The philosophy of interpretivism is often associated with inductive studies. Is it considered too huge of a mismatch to adopt this philosophy for a qualitative deductive study? If so, what are the ...
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1answer
82 views

Could relativity have been proven without classical physics? [closed]

Could relativity have been proven without classical physics? What is the term for this, in the philosophy of science?
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2k views

Carl Hempel's covering law model of explanation in history

According to Carl Hempel in "The Function of General Laws in History" (The Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 39, No. 2, 1942, pp. 35-48), explanation in history consists of the "derivation of the ...
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101 views

Hegel's measure as gauge

In Book I, third section, first chapter of Science of Logic, Hegel makes it rather clear, I find, that the measure that he is talking about -- at least in its aspect as specifying measure -- is a ...
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3answers
462 views

Demarcation problem

Many people talk about the demarcation problem, which is supposed to be about finding a criterion that would distinguish between "scientific" and "non-scientific" theories. Yet any such criterion is ...
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8answers
331 views

About Religion and Science [duplicate]

Sometimes I think, for example, that a mathematician cannot be religious. I mean, the idea of belief in a God is very antiquated and not coherent for a scientist like a mathematician. But I know that ...