Questions tagged [syllogism]

A syllogism is a form of deductive reasoning described by Aristotle containing two premises and a conclusion. Each of the premises and the conclusion contain a subject and a predicate.

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How can I explain the distribution of an O proposition's predicate?

A student raised a tough question while I was teaching formal fallacies: couldn't the statement that "some cats are not tabbies" be made with confidence upon seeing a single cat that is not a tabby? ...
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What is it called when the conclusion of one syllogism is inserted as the minor premise of a second?

As an example in Lewis's "Mere Christianity," he argues for objective morality with: Major: If you can judge one moral code (M1) to be better than another (M2) then objective morality exists. Minor: ...
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syllogism, truth-functional, or neither?

I dreamed that John F. Kennedy was born in 1917, and everything I dream is true. Therefore, Kennedy was born in 1917. All horses are animals. Therefore, all heads of horses are heads of animals. If '...
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Why isn't the method of listing Terms in syllogisms widespread?

From: Philip Johnson-Laird BA PhD Psychology (UCL), Stuart Professor of Psychology Emeritus at Princeton. (Author isn't a logician.) How We Reason (1st edn 2008). p. 145. Is there a term for ...
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Is this the correct way to phrase a logical argument with multiple syllogisms?

I'm not familiar with phrasing arguments in the form of traditional logical syllogisms, so I'd like to ask if this formulation is correct, or if it can be expressed more concisely. Note, I'm not ...
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Concerning the integrity of some logical syllogisms on moral subjectivism and ice-cream

I understand moral subjectivism to be the meta-ethical idea that all moral statements are merely expressions of the individual and thus that there are no moral statements that are implicitly (...