Questions tagged [terminology]

The study of terms and their use.

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Is there a term for the belief that if it's illegal, it's immoral?

Closely related to Is there a term for the belief that "if it's legal, it's moral"? Is there a term for the belief that if something is illegal, it's immoral? Is it simply a variant ...
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Is there a term for the belief that “if it's legal, it's moral”?

Sometimes I hear arguments that seem to appeal to the fact that something is morally permissible because it is legally permitted. For example: Abortion is moral because it's legally permitted. ...
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Word for naming (complex, abstract) phenomena

Is there a word or a (catch) phrase for naming more or less complex, mostly abstract phenomena? An example for this is the naming of the phenomenon known as serendipity as "serendipity". Naming the ...
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What does it mean to have an “account” of something?

It seems like many of the papers I've read and the goal of many fields in Philosophy is to come up with an "account" for something. For example, one of the goals of Epistemology is to come up with an ...
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What is the the difference between common sense and phronesis?

For refference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_sense https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phronesis For me this started with Giambattista Vico who pretty much had the same idea of "common sense" ...
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How to create a “definition”, such as “what is the definition of a bear”

Dictionary.com defines bear as: Any of the plantigrade, carnivorous or omnivorous mammals of the family Ursidae, having massive bodies, coarse heavy fur, relatively short limbs, and almost ...
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What is moral particularism if there are no morally perfect persons?

Moral Particularism, at its most trenchant, is the claim that there are no defensible moral principles, that moral thought does not consist in the application of moral principles to cases, and ...
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Term for the idea that regardless of our philosophy, only the observable/physical matters

I'm looking for terms that define the following presuppositions: every action should be valued based on its outcomes, not choosing is a choice impact of an action must be valued based on the ...
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To View Things by their Function

Jordan Peterson regularly talks about how we view things in the world as tools, instead of mere objects. Some examples: 1) We see something as a chair because we can sit on it. If you cannot sit on ...
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What is the meaning of “comprehension” in logic?

I was reading about the axioms of Zermelo-Fraenkel set theory and the axiom of restricted comprehension. This led me to find out what the meaning of this word is and why it's called this. Then I saw ...
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Difference between 'marxist' and 'Marxist'?

What is the difference between 'marxist' (with a small 'm') and 'Marxist'? This question arose to me when I came across this: It follows from this belief that if you can totally change the '...
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An argument for something being “full blooded” because it's all or nothing [closed]

I've seen the phrase "full blooded" used for concepts, not arguments, that do more work, are able to cover more of the ground, so to speak. This is metaphorical. But I wondered if a full blooded ...
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Social Response to Legal/Moral Duty Violation

When a person, especially a public figure, has committed a serious legal or moral violation, there is a tendency for friends/clients/companies/etc. to dissociate from that individual, even if the ...
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What does “it” refer to in this short Aristotle passage?

In this sentence: "In short, virtue is concerned with pleasures and pains; the actions that are its sources also increase it or, if they are done differently, ruin it" (Nicomachean Ethics ii3 1105a15) ...
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Where does 'numerical' in 'numerical identity' come from?

L.S., the word numerical has several meanings. E.g. numerical in the meaning ''given by numbers', and when saying Numerical Identity, meaning 'only one'. When was the first time the word was ...
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Who invented definitions?

Is an intensional genus–differentia definition an invention of ancient greek philosopy? "Chair is a seat typically having four legs and a back for one person" Have you seen definitions like this ...
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Is there an established name for position that argues against law?

This is my position. But for some reason I'm sure I'm not the first to accept it (I guess some anarchists would have it). So, there likely should be other people with this position. Is there a name ...
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What is the difference between Theory of Knowledge and Epistemology?

What are the differences, similarities, and contrasts between the two fields of study, namely, Theory of Knowledge and Epistemology? Are these terms interchangeable? Are they near-identical? What ...
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If I want everyone to be a friend to everyone, am I an anarchist? [closed]

I am not defining friendship. It's easier to say what is not friendship. In most aspects there are some signifiers of friendship. What language do you use, how do you treat people, what do you feel. ...
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Identification and identity

One's identity is routinely associated with one's body, and most will readily make the claim that they are their body. Their body is the referent for their identity. I'm having a bit of a problem ...
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Interpretation and symbolic notations of operations in mathematics

As we know a mathematical operation is a function. And a function is a special type of relation. Ultimately a relation is a set of ordered pairs. For example, what is addition of natural numbers? At ...
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What is the difference between the words “false” and “untrue”? [closed]

Since I don't have any philosophy background, please answer as simply as you can! Thank you!
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Can a theory become a law?

I'm just trying to speak properly and the definitions of fact, hypothesis, theory and law are quite mixed in my head. Some background The following are not perfect definitions but some ideas. ...
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Mind Dependence vs. Case by Case

Reddit user 'Firetaffer' asked: Subjectivism is the only one now that confuses me a bit, as being mind-dependent feels the same as relativism to me. Urk this feels like a hurdle that I have to ...
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Absolutism vs. Objectivism vs. Subjectivism vs. Relativism, in an ethical or epistemological context

I don't understand the bolded sentences from this Reddit post by user 'GFYsexyfatman' in 2015. So as the article suggests, let's think of them as two independent dichotomies: one between ...
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What is the difference between object, concept and Gestalt?

Within the context of philosophical writings (i.e. not psychology), what is the difference and relations of the following terms: Begriff Gegenstand Gestalt For example as used by Frege ("Ueber ...
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Is there a term for the belief that what is popular in society defines what is moral?

I have observed a number of people who believe, either explicitly or implicitly, that what is popular in a person’s society is what is moral. For instance, someone might say: Polls say that 90% of ...
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Term for a phrase meant to end an argument.

Is there a word for "a phrase which is intended to end discourse?" such as "That's just the way it is" or "If you don't like it, you can get out" or "Deal with it" These statements are used in ...
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How valid is it to use concepts like “fundamentals”, “origins” etc.? When are they valid? [closed]

How valid is it to use concepts like "fundamentals", "origins" etc. how are they to be judged? Particularly, consider e.g. Darwin's On the Origin of Species. Now, to claim "the origin" suggests ...
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Does theism imply worship?

There are and were many theistic religions. In most if not all of them there is some kind of worship. However, as far as I am aware theism only means a belief in some kind of unworldly beings who ...
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What philosophy or philosophy branch can the following quote be attributed to? [closed]

Not everything that is worth it pays off , not everything that pays off is worth it. I couldn't find anything specific per se. I only have a vague idea, something along the lines of it adhering to "...
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How do you talk about unclear or indefinite statements

In logic a statement can be the assertion that is made by a true or false declarative sentence... a statement is viewed as a truth bearer However, in everyday speech a statement is a definite ...
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How would you define ‘existence’?

I was talking to a friend, and she said: even before the Big Bang and the origin of space and time, still something existed. That sparked the question: how would you define ‘existence’? What ...
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What is “limited free will”? [closed]

I have heard that humans have a limited or constrained free will, especially when biological limitations are brought up. However, Merriam-Webster dictionary says: Limited 1a: confined within ...
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How to categorize a certain pattern of argumentation?

There happens to be a pattern where a discussant makes a statement about the world and his/her partner retorts with another statement or usually a question that translates the subject onto a ...
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Knowledge without a belief: do infants have beliefs?

We say that knowledge is connected with beliefs. Infants do some basic things required to sustain their life, like breathing. We can say they know how to breath. Maybe they do it aimlessly, but they ...
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How do I know the philosophy I'm going to read is something new for me and not just a waste of time?

I know it may sound like I'm thinking of myself as I already know everything within philosophy, every problem and every response. When I was 15 reading it could be interesting. However now, most ...
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Term or phrase for “widening definition(s) to find a signal” [closed]

I'm not sure this is simply philosophy and not also some term of art used in other domains, but it's definitely conceptual and it is used in observation of people. I saw an article a while back ...
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Is atheism about the existence of Deities or a personal perception of Sacredness?

Wikipedia on atheism: Atheism is, in the broadest sense, the absence of belief in the existence of deities. Now what about deities? A deity is a supernatural being considered divine or sacred. ...
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Extreme examples for exploring the scope of statements - does this technique have a name? - Is it a fallacy?

When discussing opinions with friends, I often resort to making extreme scenarios out of their opinions in an attempt to investigate the limits within which their statements hold true (to them). ...
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Resources on materialism and physicalism?

I was wondering if there is anyone here who could recommend specific books or information specific resources from assorted philosophers on the topic of materiality and physicality? I've finished ...
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What argumentative tactic is in play when someone says “The media isn't covering this”?

I see memes about once a week which state, "The media isn't covering this really important thing. Shouldn't they be ashamed! Like and Share and FWD to grandma if you agree!". Similar posts include "...
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Is there a name for people who believe in a self-professed God but reject to venerate him/her/it?

Suppose I believe there is an entity that considers itself to be "a god". This means that out of the whole of my lexicon, the word "god" is what best describes this entity. But I refuse to obey this ...
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Is there an idea of non-spatial reality in philosophy?

Our world is spatial. In particular there are 3 dimensions and we can measure lengths of objects in either of them. However, when thinking about metaphysics I came to the conclusion that there might ...
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Defining 2 words with respect to each other

I apologize if this is in the wrong forum. I listen to a radio show where the host talks a lot about love & hate. He defines love as 'the absence of hate' and he says that hate is 'the absence of ...
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Is antinatalism against any kind of producing new minds (people)?

My argument is "it's better never to be a child". Being transhumanist, I assert it's better for new people to be produced adults right away, skipping the childhood part and believe it will be possible....
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What is the name of the phenomenon that a thing must be named in order to understand it?

The concept is popular in the media and philosophy that to understand a thing, one should have a name for it. In Star War it is widely known with "Named must your fear be before banish it you can", ...
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How did Aristotle arrive at the definition of substance/ousia?

In Aristotle's terminology, ousia, or substance, is that which is the subject of predication, but never itself predicated of anything. This is a highly technical definition; I don't expect it reflects ...
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Why is ousia translated as substance? Should it be?

From Aristotle's Metaphysics, translation Reeve 2016, Z1: What is being?---is just the question, What is substance? This statement is a lot more obvious in Greek: Ousia is a noun formed from ...
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What's the difference between “unfalsifiable” and “true”?

Unfalsifiable statements are said to be important in science. An example of such a statement: All swans are white. In plain English, that's simply a truthful statement. So what's the difference ...