Questions tagged [terminology]

The study of terms and their use.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
1 vote
2 answers
77 views

Proper name for "affirming the common ground" fallacy / rhetorical technique?

I'm trying to find the name for this form—I don't know if it'd rightly be called a "fallacy", or just a "rhetorical technique"—where you affirm or reiterate non-disputed premises ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
59 views

What is the difference between anti-teleology and deontology?

In regards to ethical positions, what is anti-teleology, and how is it different from deontology? Are they opposites or is their relationship of another sort?
user avatar
-1 votes
2 answers
44 views

"All there is are cells" as a philosophical school of thought

Like atomists since Demokrit and Lucretius believe that all matter is made out of atoms, biologists since Schleiden and Schwann believe that all living matter is made out of cells. But since atomism ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
45 views

Does Bayesianism not have a concept of knowledge, given that belief is partial and not categorical?

If Bayesianism replaces the categorical belief of former analyses of knowledge with a quantitative notion of partial belief, does Bayesianism have a concept of 'knowledge' at all?
user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
100 views

Can a collection be a single 'thing'?

Can a collection be any single object in itself, for example Collection A is 'one collection' or set A is 'one set' or even one 'mathematical object' if viewed as a whole? For example a set containing ...
user avatar
12 votes
6 answers
4k views

Are humans and other animals machines?

It has been said that biological organisms are one kind of machine, albeit highly complex ones. But is this really true? To answer this question, one needs a precise definition of "machine". ...
user avatar
  • 2,822
0 votes
2 answers
29 views

Intuitively, attributes and properties are similar/the same; what, if anything, differentiates them?

We use words like attributed to and property of, and attribute of, but is there any difference of meaning? Both seem to imply characteristics or qualities of objects but that doesn't feel very ...
user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
1 answer
64 views

'for some x' statements [duplicate]

What is the correct understanding of the phrase 'for some x' in logical definitions? For example sometimes I've seen it as 'for some (values of) x' and others in uses such as 'there exists some x such ...
user avatar
4 votes
7 answers
981 views

How does one determine the boundary of an object?

Say we have what we would call an 'object' made of many components, can these 'components' be named objects themselves? In the case do we have an object or many 'objects'? Do we define an object to be ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
37 views

What is it called when I forget reasons something is true?

There is a phenomenon that I experience, but I do not know how it is called in respective literature, so I cannot research and read more about it. I am an engineer, therefore it is my job to ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
101 views

When does 'number' become 'quantity'?

Numbers themselves are simply conceptual objects, but when does number become a quantity? Is the 'cardinality' of a set a 'quantity'? it is a count but we represent it with just a number that we ...
user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
163 views

What is the last definition of "science"? what is its difference with knowledge?

I want to know is there a unite definition of "science"? my guess is "NO"! What do philosophers means by science that they can't define it? what is its difference with knowledge?
user avatar
  • 145
1 vote
0 answers
53 views

Looking for the name of "if everyone is x, no one is x"

Usually when I browse this forum, I see many people ask for the names of fallacies. Currently, I'm looking for the name of the philosophical position that goes something like, "if everyone is x, ...
user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
0 answers
39 views

Is "antifoundation" the most pragmatic word for the underlying concept?

Aczel's antifoundation principle is not a statement that there are no well-founded sets. It is just the statement that every accessible pointed graph images a set,⭯ and since a graph consisting in a ...
user avatar
13 votes
7 answers
4k views

In simple terms, what is the difference between logic in mathematics and philosophy?

I want to understand the difference between mathematical and philosophical logic. I actually thought they were the same till I read this post. Concisely speaking, what is the difference between how a ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
60 views

What is the name of the view that math, mind, and matter are all that exist?

My view is that mind, matter, and mathematical objects are all that exist. What is the name of that view? Dualism is the view that both mind and matter exist. So, perhaps my view should be called ...
user avatar
  • 2,822
1 vote
1 answer
113 views

General analysis of logical explosions

I've seen the word explosion used in basic logic and deontic logic. The commonality seems to be an explosion is when the 'topic' of a logic universally applies, i.e. everything can be inferred or ...
user avatar
3 votes
4 answers
156 views

What is the name of the view that the world as presented to us by our senses is false and there is a true world behind it?

Some historical examples include the Gnostics, Advaita Vedanta, Kant, Schopenhauer, and countless mystics. I was just wondering if there is a common name for these sorts of worldviews. Thank you!
user avatar
  • 609
2 votes
1 answer
100 views

Hegel's Actual and Real

Hegel uses the terms Actuality (Wirklichkeit) and Reality (Realität) often in his works. Can anyone help make determinations about the relation of these two terms? How are they distinguished from each ...
user avatar
  • 300
0 votes
1 answer
118 views

Is there an alternative to infinity?

We can say that a discrete set with 1 and 2 allows us to count just from 1 to 2 but a sequential set with 1 and 2 allows us to count from 1 to 2 in an infinite way (1.1, 1.2, 1.3 ...) but no man can ...
user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
127 views

What is the difference between thing, entity, and object? [closed]

What exactly is the difference between the words "thing", "entity", and "object"? Do they all have the same meaning? I think they are the same, but I want to know what ...
user avatar
  • 2,822
2 votes
1 answer
134 views

Reference for precise definitions of notations in philosophical theories & books

As a math learner, when I want to read important philosophical theories like Descartes, Kant, etc. I face a big problem that bothers me. Why does no one define things and concepts precisely then ...
user avatar
  • 145
5 votes
2 answers
139 views

Technical terms for 'House Elf Problem'

There is an informal ethical dilemma known as the House Elf problem, after the Harry Potter slave race who are, universally*, enthusiastic servants who strongly prefer to be servile and be treated as ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
242 views

Is mathematical induction deduction, and if so, why is it so named?

By induction, I mean this screenshot from this Youtube video Abduction as an Aspect of Retroduction | Chiasson, Phyllis | Commens Induction: The prefix “in,” also from the Latin has to do with ...
user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
110 views

Definition of 'Identity' [duplicate]

This may seem like a very specific or stupid question, but I'm new to this, I'm interested in the idea of 'identity' and 'identical. I've heard some description of the idea different 'copies' or ...
user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
166 views

Mathematical objects existing as different instances

I have a slightly complex conceptual question about the idea of 'multiple' instances of mathematical objects. In particular Real Numbers, and generally the idea of having multiple instances of ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
137 views

The application of logic to the metaphor of glass half full or half empty [closed]

If there is optimistic, pessimistic, and realistic, what would be the most logical way of defining unrealistic? For example, the optimistic says the glass is half full. The pessimistic says the glass ...
user avatar
  • 11
3 votes
3 answers
73 views

Is there a name for the phenomenon where a system that selects for one quality eventually leads to optimizing that quality at the cost of others?

There's a pattern that pops up in a wide variety of systems - biological, economic, social, etc - and can occur whenever survival and propagation within the system is determined by how well members ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
56 views

Can you explain the problem with Aristotle's doctrine of terms presented in this excerpt?

I'm really confused about the second paragraph. This is form Kenny's "A New History of Philosophy". "One of the dysfunctional features of the doctrine of terms is that it fosters ...
user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
43 views

? as a logical connective

I am reading Doubt Truth to be a Liar by Graham Priest. In it he uses the symbol ? as a logical connective, and I am unsure of it's meaning. Given his use of ? (a ? a) to denote the Law of Identity, ...
user avatar
9 votes
7 answers
1k views

Is the dichotomy between natural and unnatural defensible?

Are not the dictionary definitions of natural and unnatural inconsistent? Why wouldn't whatever humans create (e.g. money, plastic bags, books, internet, laptop, lamp, buildings, airplanes, etc) be ...
user avatar
  • 1,118
1 vote
1 answer
74 views

Term for the dichotomy of blaming a philosophical counter-example on oneself vs. our commonsense

Imagine some philosopher answers a question of the form "What is X?". Then a critic points out that, according to this answer, O is not X, but we clearly consider it to be X. It seems that ...
user avatar
  • 149
0 votes
0 answers
30 views

Looking for term from distributive justice theory "distribuenda"

In distributive just theory the term "distribuenda" refers to the thing that is to be distributed and has an analogue to the term "equalisandum", which refers to the thing that is ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
90 views

Would philosophy exist without semantics?

With so many threads on this forum seeming to me - from my point of view - as wars of words -can it be argued whether semantics are philosophy's oxygen? Would any philosophical debate actually take ...
user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
68 views

Are the terms formula and algorithm synonymous in formal logic?

How to do something in two or more steps would feel/grasped to me as pretty much matching the common usages of both terms, but to find possible nuances common in the philosophical literature in ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
59 views

What is the difference between a model and algorithm?

I would say that an algorithm is a private case of model because it describes how something generally works --- just mathematically.
user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
93 views

Is there any philosophical difference between "I have no horns" and "I have horns, but they have zero volume"?

The common idea is that, on one hand we have "I don't have X", on the other hand we have "I have X, but X has some its quality equal to zero, making it to behave the same way as if it ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
54 views

Is there a term for properties that an entity has at a particular time, but which depend on the properties it has at other times?

Is there a term for properties that an entity has at a particular time, but which depend on the properties it has at other times? For example, when he was a child, Lebron James had the property of ...
user avatar
4 votes
3 answers
113 views

What is the word if someone starts his argument with a conclusion?

Say, I'm arguing with a believer about Noahs flood. According to their scripture and other sources it is described as global. But there is no evidence for a global flood, hence why the believer says ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
54 views

Why physical force and power in the definition of violence

I've been working my way through the concept of violence. I started with the definition provided by the WHO as a reasonable starting place: Violence is “the intentional use of physical force or ...
user avatar
  • 17.2k
1 vote
1 answer
119 views

What is the philosophical term for when a property is emergent from an underlying structure?

There is a term that refers to this, which I can't find anywhere, but I remember it from studies of consciousness and the brain. For example, "consciousness is ____ on the physical brain". ...
user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
125 views

Question about Russell's distinction between knowledge of things and knowledge of truths in 'The Problems of Philosophy'

In his book, Russell distinguishes several types of knowledge. He first distinguishes knowledge of truths, and of things. "the sense in which what we know is true (...) i.e. to what are called ...
user avatar
  • 277
5 votes
1 answer
71 views

Is Russell's "(im)predicativity" terminology related to (or even derived from) Kant's "existence is not a predicate" argument?

I'm a mathematician who's generally ignorant of philosophy, so forgive me if my question is a bit sloppy. I'm really trying to ask about a historical connection/context. I recently encountered the ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
45 views

Arguing / Pretending as an Opponent Speaker

What do you call a person or the strategy where the speaker acts as the opponent to know the issue at hand better (as an opponent). For instance, a Vegan (person X) can argue with another Vegan, ...
user avatar
  • 103
-1 votes
1 answer
54 views

Can 'Trust' be quantified?

I believe the concept of trust or the word trust itself can be given many definitions depending on someone's understanding of it. Agreeing with the definition given on dictionnary.com website as ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
162 views

Atheist, Agnostic...Wait for more data?

I'm a scientist by heart: I believe that while the existence of God, however defined (or any metaphysic question, for that matter), is a tough one, it might not be completely inaccessible to science. ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
46 views

Is there a philosophical word for any imaginable or conceivable world?

Is there a philosophical word for any imaginable or conceivable world? People use words like simulations to express ideas similar to this, but there doesn't seem to be a specific word for this. Do you ...
user avatar
  • 1,243
3 votes
0 answers
121 views

Why isn't astronomy called astrology? [closed]

Many scientific topics are called ---logy. Like psychology, biology, archeology, meteorology, cosmology, physiology, geology, etc. The adjective "logy" means "knowledge of". One ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
47 views

Is there a single word for an arbitrary closed curved line?

A circle is a circle. A triangle is a triangle. An ellipse is an ellipse. A square is a square. Is there a name for the general case of an arbitrarily formed line (so it can be curved) with the ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
78 views

Why are curved triangles not considered as triangles?

I asked a question on the math side where it was said that this is a philosophical question. So here it is. Why are curved triangles, in Euclidean space, not considered triangles? The only case of a ...
user avatar

1
2 3 4 5
10