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A syllogism is a form of deductive reasoning described by Aristotle containing two premises and a conclusion. Each of the premises and the conclusion contain a subject and a predicate.

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The term syllogism is due to Aristotle (originally sullogismos). Aristotle defined it as: an argument (logos) in which, certain things having been laid down, something different from what has … syllogism called Darapti: All C's are A's All C's are B's ∴ Some A's are B's But this is invalid in modern logic. (When there are no A's, B's or C's, the premises are true and the conclusion false …
answered Jun 2 '16 by Eliran
2
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In a world without S, "All S is P" is true. You must keep in mind how it is formulated in first-order logic: ∀x(Sx→Px) Since there are no S things, the implication is always (vacuously) true. …
answered Apr 2 '16 by Eliran