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A syllogism is a form of deductive reasoning described by Aristotle containing two premises and a conclusion. Each of the premises and the conclusion contain a subject and a predicate.

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Is there a term for the type of solution beneath, where one lists the Terms? The name of the syllogism is AEE in the first figure. Is that label the term you were looking for? Here, the …
answered Jul 18 '18 by Mark Andrews
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There are two negative premises, so the reasoning is invalid regardless of the intended conclusion. These two premises have no valid solution.
answered Oct 11 '16 by Mark Andrews
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If I have an invalid syllogism, it can still be considered a syllogism, right? That's right. An argument is a syllogism ...if and only if it consists of three categorical sentences … invalidity does not enter into the definition. The example, as written, is invalid, but a syllogism, nonetheless. …
answered Oct 25 '17 by Mark Andrews
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Why do we use the capital "K" for both "kill papers" and "cars that kill papers"? "[K]ill papers" is actually shorthand for "cars that kill papers". The statement is saying that all members of …
answered Jul 25 '18 by Mark Andrews
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Yes, the conclusion follows. Here, the form of the argument is "P, therefore P". When the premise is identical to the conclusion, the complete if-then statement is a tautology. Tautologies are necessa …
answered Mar 10 '17 by Mark Andrews
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Transposing the premises does not change the validity of the syllogism. This action does alter the normal format of a syllogism, where the predicate of the conclusion appears in the first premise …
answered Dec 4 '17 by Mark Andrews
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Conclusion (I) does not follow. The syllogism is EIE in the fourth figure. No P are M; Some S are M; thus No S are P. The problem is that the minor term (S, CDs) is distributed in the conclusion but …
answered Aug 4 '17 by Mark Andrews
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Why does one negative premise suffice to imply a negative conclusion? One negative premise is sufficient to require a negative conclusion because of the distribution of terms in the premises. Fro …
answered Nov 29 '18 by Mark Andrews
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Is it not also the case that the minor term of a syllogism is the subject of the conclusion and the major term is the predicate of the conclusion? Yes. If so, then which of ‘A’ and ‘C …
answered Jul 27 by Mark Andrews
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form is AEE in the second figure (All P are M; No S are M; thus No S are P). The syllogism is valid. The middle term (impulsive people) is distributed in the minor premise (2). …
answered Jan 6 by Mark Andrews
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a valid syllogism is violated here. The question says: All P are Q; All Q are R; Thus All R are P. The minor term R is distributed in the conclusion, but not in the minor premise. In effect, there is no statement here that the quality R applies to every P; for that reason the syllogism fails. …
answered Jul 27 '18 by Mark Andrews
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How to get the conclusion false? I regret to write that you are stuck with a valid syllogism. This example is AAA in the first figure. …
answered Aug 25 '17 by Mark Andrews
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, which is committed when a categorical syllogism employs two universal premises (“all”) to arrive at a particular (“some”) conclusion. In a valid categorical syllogism, if the two premises are …
answered Jan 7 by Mark Andrews
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Both examples draw a particular conclusion (some... not) from two universal premises (all, none). Both syllogisms are valid, but are “weakened” forms because in each case the premises support the univ …
answered Jul 14 by Mark Andrews