Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with Search options user 22165

concerns logical fallacies, which are errors in the logic or reasoning of an argument that result in a misconception or presumption

1
vote
What is the fallacy in “If A, then B; not B; therefore not A”? Looking only at the question, there is no fallacy. The technique is called Denying the Consequent, and this method produces a valid …
answered Oct 27 '17 by Mark Andrews
3
votes
Here is Wikipedia, "Fallacy of composition". The fallacy of composition arises when one infers that something is true of the whole from the fact that it is true of some part of the whole (or …
answered Jun 1 '18 by Mark Andrews
13
votes
I suppose that there are a whole pile of fallacies behind such arguments. The one that first comes to mind is that the argument assumes what it sets out to prove. “There is nothing seriously wrong …
answered Nov 22 '18 by Mark Andrews
2
votes
Some conspiracy theories are fallacious and some are valid. Such arguments are fallacious when they claim that a statement is right or wrong because a certain person said it. In these examples the …
answered Jun 24 '17 by Mark Andrews
1
vote
Here is what I can offer. Assume the proposition is: If and only if P, then Q. Then the refutation of P is also the refutation of Q, and vice versa. Assume the proposition is simply: If P, then …
answered Apr 18 '17 by Mark Andrews
2
votes
As stated, the superior's argument is fallacious. The primary problem is its circularity, because the argument reduces to this: a superior's order is law because a superior's order is law. A supe …
answered Mar 8 '17 by Mark Andrews
0
votes
How far does the fallaciousness of the recourse to authority fallacy reach? The argument from authority reaches as far as the facts. Then it stops. The official argument can be the basis of be …
answered May 11 by Mark Andrews
0
votes
I am not sure there is a fallacy in this example. The faulty expectation of increased revenue seems to arise from some failure in inductive reasoning. The seller examined what people are likely to do …
answered Jan 22 by Mark Andrews
0
votes
The fallacy is the fallacy of four terms. A categorical syllogism may have three and only three terms: subject, predicate, and middle. Using one of the terms in two different senses unravels what migh …
answered Feb 21 '17 by Mark Andrews
2
votes
You might be thinking of "tu quoque"-- "You also." The fallacy appears when Person A responds to criticism from B by pointing out that B does the same thing. The response does not prove or negate anyt …
answered Jul 21 '17 by Mark Andrews
0
votes
In black-and-white thinking, the problem is often the mistaken use of contrary statements in place of contradictory statements. Two contrary statements cannot be true at the same time, but both can be …
answered Jan 24 by Mark Andrews
0
votes
The content appears in the conclusory first sentence, relating to the poor quality of the legal argument. The example assumes this sentence to be true. The implication is as follows. Because of the …
answered Jun 22 '17 by Mark Andrews
9
votes
The presumption of innocence in law serves the same purpose as the null hypothesis in science. The purpose is to produce an accurate outcome in relation to the facts at hand and the seriousness of the …
answered Mar 14 '18 by Mark Andrews
11
votes
The “whatabout” argument remains nothing more than the tu quoque fallacy, even in complex or difficult comparisons. Each situation must stand or fall on its own merit. That said, when there is a comp …
answered Jul 13 by Mark Andrews
2
votes
The original example: Either Your hair is short or long. It is long. Therefore it is not short. Assumptions. (1) Short is defined as 'not long' (S= ~L) and vice versa. One term is the negation of the …
answered Oct 25 '16 by Mark Andrews

15 30 50 per page