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Induction still valid?" The issue here will be the main criticism of the Popper's solution to the problem of induction. Popper said that induction is not justifiable. That a theory has been … claimed to have solved the problem of induction. We do not have to make the assumption, he tells us, if we proceed by formulating conjectures and attempting to falsify them. He says that, as a basis for …
answered Aug 5 '13 by Annotations
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for the inductive connection. If the justification of induction cannot be deductive, then it would beg the question. To Hume, induction itself, cannot explain the inductive connection … . (Wikipedia) But I ask, why do we need to show that induction is a necessary truth? We can not demonstrate a necessary truth but we can demonstrate that we have a valid reason to believe. The principle of …
answered Jan 13 '13 by Annotations
2
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how does induction relate to falsifiability, and when does one trump the other? Why Karl Popper wanted to say that the criteria of falsifiability is better than induction? Popper wanted to … say that induction is not justifiable. That a theory has been corroborated in the past "says nothing whatever about future performance." Popper wanted to say that it is possible to avoid assuming that …
answered Feb 12 '13 by Annotations
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Hume challenged other philosophers to come up with a deductive reason for the inductive connection. If the justification of induction cannot be deductive, then it would beg the question. To Hume … , induction itself, cannot explain the inductive connection. Wittgenstein's early account of causation in TLP follows Hume in rejecting the idea of causal necessity. There is only one kind of necessity …
answered Mar 6 '13 by Annotations