Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with Search options answers only user 4752

A syllogism is a form of deductive reasoning described by Aristotle containing two premises and a conclusion. Each of the premises and the conclusion contain a subject and a predicate.

6
votes
The syllogism is correct, according to Aristotle's doctrine, exactly because of Existential import: Aristotle's logic system does not cover cases where there are no instances. See The … if the subaltern is false." Thus, according to A, we nay say that the said syllogism is valid, but it has a false premise. See also Hurley, page 262: "[see] table of conditionally valid forms. If …
answered May 4 '17 by Mauro ALLEGRANZA
5
votes
In origin, sllogism was defined with categorical proposition i.e. for proposition like "All men are mortal" with class terms. The extension to singular terms can be managed considering the "singleton …
answered Jun 30 '17 by Mauro ALLEGRANZA
6
votes
there is no occurrence of the specific example of syllogism. According to: Joseph Maria Bochenski, A History of Formal Logic (1961, or.ed.1956), page 232: A first widening of the Aristotelian …
answered May 25 '16 by Mauro ALLEGRANZA
4
votes
See Syllogism: Aristotle's Theory: terms can be combined in different ways to form three figures (skhemata), which Aristotle presents in the Prior Analytics. When the four categorical sentences … valid deductions. To the 19 already mentioned we must add two subalternate moods in the first figure (Barbari and Celaront), two subalternate moods in the second figure (Camestrop and Cesaro), and one subalternate mood in the fourth figure (Camenop). See also Syllogism. …
answered Dec 5 '17 by Mauro ALLEGRANZA
1
vote
In Aristotle's Logic : Syllogisms are structures of sentences each of which can meaningfully be called true or false: assertions (apophanseis), in Aristotle’s terminology. According to Aristotle, …
answered Dec 29 '15 by Mauro ALLEGRANZA
2
votes
For "A is B" the explanation is simple. Gensler's language has two types of "basic" formulae: (i) formulae expressing relation between sets ("general categoris"): "All logicians are charming", tr …
answered Apr 2 '16 by Mauro ALLEGRANZA
3
votes
Because I is particular affirmative and Rule 4 states : A Negative Premise Requires a Negative Conclusion, i.e. if one of the premises is negative, also the conclusion is.
answered Dec 28 '15 by Mauro ALLEGRANZA
6
votes
the number of its argument-places. Thus "... is father of ..." and "... is less than ..." are dyadic : arity = 2 (two argument places; usually called : binary relations). Categorical syllogism uses …
answered Sep 28 '14 by Mauro ALLEGRANZA
5
votes
It is the Fallacy of the undistributed middle: All Apples are Fruit All Oranges are Fruit Therefore, all Apples are Oranges is clearly invalid.
answered Feb 28 by Mauro ALLEGRANZA
1
vote
See Syllogism : Basic structure : A categorical syllogism consists of three parts: Major premise Minor premise Conclusion Each of the premises has one term in … third term, that is not present in the conclusion, is the middle term. A syllogism is of the first figure when the middle term is subject of major premise and predicate of minor one. In conclusion …
answered Jul 27 by Mauro ALLEGRANZA
4
votes
It seems that the list of categories from Marcus Friedrich Wendelin's book: Logicae institutiones (1654) [see page 14-on] comes from Petrus Ramus's Dialectique (1955). See also: Walter J. Ong, Ramus, …
answered May 2 '16 by Mauro ALLEGRANZA
2
votes
(Some P are not G). No Even is Odd (No O are P). Therefore : Some Even is less-or-equal than 1. <= wrong ! See Fallacy of exclusive premises : no categorical syllogism is valid when both of its premises are negative. …
answered Oct 11 '16 by Mauro ALLEGRANZA
1
vote
Comment Valid means true in all cases. Thus, the schema : Some A are B Some B are C Therefore : Some A are C is not valid exactly for the reason you have stated : it beco …
answered Dec 29 '15 by Mauro ALLEGRANZA
3
votes
No; reduction to absurdum is not expressible with a syllogistic form of argument. Reductio is a more "basic" argument: a propositional one. We can express it either as a "law" or axiom: ⊢ (¬ϕ → …
answered Oct 19 '17 by Mauro ALLEGRANZA
4
votes
Celaront was not in the original Aristotle's list of valid syllogistic figures (or : moods). It was added later (during the Middles Ages ?) as one of the two subalternate moods in the first figure (B …
answered Jul 13 by Mauro ALLEGRANZA

15 30 50 per page