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1
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The opposite of "black" is just "non-black". If you want to think of it in terms of a test, try to imagine an object that would be a counterexample to the the claim that "everything is black". A whit …
answered Jan 7 '14 by shane
3
votes
The best advice on how to get better at reading a language (across different disciplines, and across different periods in the history of that language) is simply to read more of the language. If I … ; as in all other instances, which have ever fallen under his observation." Enquiries Concerning Human Understanding, §9. The language here is a bit unusual, even to native English speakers. For …
answered Sep 16 '15 by shane
1
vote
No, you couldn't, but not for some deep philosophical reason. But just because the lexicon (the store of words) is only one part of any language. You would also need to learn the grammar of the … language. Also, even if you had memorized the dictionary of some natural language, that wouldn't mean you'd be able to figure out the grammar on your own just by reading text. Also you'd be lacking …
answered Feb 15 '14 by shane
5
votes
rather than a contradiction: "A or not A." This sentence is true, and indeed necessarily true. But the fact that it is a necessary truth still entails that it is meaningful utterance to make, even if we don't often have occasion to utter tautologies in ordinary language very often. …
answered Jun 6 '16 by shane
1
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Hypothetically, yes. For any non-trivial argument though, the logic you’d employ would be much more complicated than the textbook logic you learn in a first course in formal logic. Most important phi …
answered May 13 '18 by shane