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5
votes
The author is using the term "strong" for inductive arguments as an analogous concept to the term "valid" for deductive arguments. Remember that the definition of validity (at least the one generally …
answered Dec 15 '15 by virmaior
2
votes
It sounds like the quote is referring to charity of interpretation which is a general expectation in philosophy. This concept means that when I read someone's argument or position, I should try to und …
answered Feb 9 '14 by virmaior
2
votes
I think the answer to the question hinges on what ethical framework we are working from. Put it another way, I think there's a hidden assumption that makes your though experiment appear to work. If …
answered Jul 1 '15 by virmaior
8
votes
The reason why argument by analogy could be called invalid hinges on a technical definition in formal logic. Viz., "invalid" means not attaining to formal validity either in sentential logic or one of …
answered May 15 '14 by virmaior
2
votes
I"m not super familiar with fitch, but here's how I would do it: First, assume the assumption we are given. Then figure out the likely path to the conclusion. Given our conclusion is a conditional, …
answered Oct 8 '16 by virmaior