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4
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native tongue. However, the devil is in the details. Many of the best philosophers pushed the boundaries of their language, and when one does so, it becomes remarkably hard to effectively capture the … hours on this sentence, trying to explore its meaning in its original language. I readily admit that I probably still got it wrong (shameless plea: any who speak Chinese, please correct any …
answered Sep 16 '15 by Cort Ammon
3
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If such a universal logical language exists, it would be subject to some very peculiar limitations which were developed by Alfred Tarski. His undefinability theorem puts some very interesting … limitations on such a language. In particular he considered a language which: Is a formal language (its particularly hard to provide a concrete semantic model for non-formal languages) Was self …
answered Mar 28 '16 by Cort Ammon
4
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particular limits on processes like you describe. It's very hard for a language to prove it's own semantics, and most of the languages we are interested in when talking about proofs are simply not capable of … it. Of course, there is a way to do this. What defines a "correct logical reasoning in natural language?" If the definition is "there exists a corresponding formal logical proof," then the answer …
answered May 13 '18 by Cort Ammon