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Karl Marx is a political philosopher and author of the Marxist theory of government and economics.

3
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Division of labour is inevitable; but judgement has to be exercised as to what extent. Making a bow and arrow and then going hunting is very different from sitting in an assembly line and screwing i …
answered Mar 14 '15 by Mozibur Ullah
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I'm not sure here that Marx is concerned here with the specific notion of book-keeping: We are concerned here only with the general character of the costs of circulation ie this is what in … individual] and concentrated in the large scale as the exclusive functions of banks [for the book-keeping example]. Here, though Marx doesn't mention it; one needs to ignore the additional functions of …
answered May 23 '15 by Mozibur Ullah
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accepted freemdom as construed as such in the realm of the human and coincident with Gods divine plan. One might say, in the realm of mechanics natural law is one aspect of this plan. Marx thought that …
answered Dec 6 '13 by Mozibur Ullah
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The answer is no, when you examine his words, yes if you examine the deed: wikipedia has: Karl Marx died before the establishment of formal social science but nonetheless fiercely rejected Comtean …
answered Sep 26 '12 by Mozibur Ullah
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Marx was a theorist of Capitalism which he considered the dominant form of economic activity on this era; to be distinguished from earlier ones - such as the mercantile city states and feudalism; or … . As Marx was after a scientific explanation of economics he couldn't allow his personal sympathies distort his thinking on the subject; the force of gravity operates no matter how I may feel about …
answered May 21 '15 by Mozibur Ullah
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of Value - which, I think from how it's been theorised by Locke, Smith, Pareto and Marx has a very strong claim in being the correct theory of value. Is it fair to say that on the Capital/Labour …
answered Nov 21 '15 by Mozibur Ullah
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But I can't identify the base in Coriolanus, because it seems as though they (the Plebeians) don't do any work. Who do you think are actually tilling the soil, cutting the corn, stacking the hays …
answered Mar 19 '14 by Mozibur Ullah
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Aristotle, says in the Metaphysics, that: All philosophers agree that the Principles of Change are Contraries And that they act on some Other; he admits it's hard to establish whether they are …
answered Oct 3 '15 by Mozibur Ullah
2
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It's a piece of polemic designed to attract people to the cause of Communism; and as Marx was a good writer it certainly attracted a lot of attention; even after a century - one cannot say the same …
answered Feb 15 '15 by Mozibur Ullah
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slavery. For Hegel, this is the construction of civil society; then every man who is free in himself will have to find himself through these very real limits. Arendt, going on from Marx, points out …
answered Aug 2 '16 by Mozibur Ullah
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From Mandels introduction to Capital - Volume 1: What Marx explained, however, was above all, the ruthless and irresistible impulse to growth that characterises production for private profit and … take place of the capitalist one: it will function according to other laws that govern the capitalist one. Marx distinguishes the capitalist regime from the regime preceding it, that of petty …
answered Jun 28 '14 by Mozibur Ullah
2
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being dismantled piece-meal globally. Note, popularly the proletariat is identified with the working classes, ie manual labour; but for Marx, they are those who are paid for the labour via a wage, so this also includes the professions and the middle classes. …
answered Jul 26 '17 by Mozibur Ullah
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The labour theory of value is not just Marxist; it's also classical - Adam Smith for example uses it. Fetishism of commodities, in a way, could only have occurred after the Industrial Revolution, thi …
answered Dec 25 '15 by Mozibur Ullah
5
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Marxism has many aspects to it; the main difference appears to be as a political movement, and as a school of thought. As a political movement, it is as political and legal theorist Roberto Unger put …
answered Aug 29 '15 by Mozibur Ullah
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work where man, as Homo Faber builds the human world of artifice. I'm not sure that she would call herself a Marxist, but she certainly takes Marx into account, at least critically; for example … taken to be a precursor of existentialism, from Hegel, calling the former a Romantic Christian; perhaps one can think of Marx as a Romantic Materialist, given his espousal of the proletariat as world …
answered Aug 2 '16 by Mozibur Ullah