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Results for zeno's paradox
2
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0answers
something else I missed Zeno's arrow paradox: ...(the mistake is similar to Version 1 of Dichotomy paradox) Version 2: Even anyone can walk though half of any distance, he still have to … is similar to second version of Dichotomy paradox) In both versions, I think solution 1s are fine, are they correct? And please tell me if you know where I can find some formal proof in calculus which shows the mistakes of Zeno's paradoxes Any help or suggestion would be appreciated. …
asked Sep 6 by Manx
3
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1answer
Zeno's arrow paradox: Zeno states that for motion to occur, an object must change the position which it occupies. He gives an example of an arrow in flight. He states that in any one (duration … motion is impossible. The paradox says that "in any one (duration-less) instant of time, the arrow is neither moving to where it is, nor to where it is not". But it must be correct if passed time's …
asked May 4 '16 by onurcanbektas
-1
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2answers
quarter, he must travel one-eighth; before an eighth, one-sixteenth; and so on. But you can also apply this configuration to the halfway of the distance. In other words, this paradox assumes that we can … move and, based on that, it derives a conclusion that we cannot move, since a distance has a half distance(i.e can be divided into parts). So this statement should be wrong obviously but it has been called a "paradox". What is the problem in my explanation? …
asked May 3 '16 by onurcanbektas
2
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3answers
Is it correct to formulate Zeno's arrow paradox as follows? 1) If the arrow is still, it is not moving. 2) The flight of an arrow can be broken into instances, in all of which the arrow is still … . 3) Hence, putting all of these instances of time together, the flying arrows is motionless. Is this a paradox because the conclusion, 3), is false, since nothing can be in motion and at rest at the …
asked Jul 10 '17 by Wesley
0
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1answer
Zeno's paradox? "Aristotle's solution was largely accepted until the end of 19th century when Cantor and Dedekind formalized the notion of continuum in terms of set theory...Thinking back, one realizes … What is Aristotle's refutation/objection/solution to Zeno's paradoxes? The following is all I could find in around in the Internet: Why is Aristotle's objection not considered a resolution to …
asked Feb 24 '18 by Katerl3s
6
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2answers
If Zeno seemed to prove our perceptions cannot be trusted, how, then, can/does an Empiricist justify faith in their perceptions? I'm looking for various solutions (or justifications in the face of the paradoxes to maintain Empiricism) of these issues. …
asked Aug 10 '16 by NationWidePants
1
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3answers
so on. Consider a motionless particle painted blue and which slowly changes in colour intensity and then back down again - in effect a slowly flashing blue dot. Does Zenos paradox of motion apply to …
asked Apr 28 '15 by Mozibur Ullah
9
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3answers
In Physics VIII.8, Aristotle refers to his usual resolution of Zeno's paradox of motion: We should make the same response to anyone who uses Zeno's argument to ask whether it is always necessary …
asked Dec 2 '15 by Mozibur Ullah
11
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3answers
have chosen. Adieu Zeno? Does Quantum Loop Gravity put a final nail to an age old paradox? If not, what are some major criticisms or flaws in Rovelli's theory? … deriving from the incompleteness of knowledge. Background: Aristotle to Zeno Aristotle, who pioneered many fields, writing treatises from Sleep to Dream Interpretation, Memory to Breath and of …
asked Dec 13 '11 by user1207
2
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1answer
The paradox in question: If every unit of length is made up of smaller units of length, it seems that you need to have units of length before a unit of length can come into existence. But this is … clearly contradictory. This paradox would seem to imply the following. Say you have two lines lying exactly on top of one another "|", and you want to slide one off the other to create space between …
asked Sep 12 '17 by IgnorantCuriosity
1
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1answer
Look at this argument: The 1st introduction: We may present time on an axis; therefore any time interval is a segment, thus consisted of infinite number of points, on this axis. The 2nd introduction: …
asked Mar 16 '16 by Simorq
4
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1answer
The Stanford Encycl. of Philosophy mentions that we know of Zeno's work only through various secondary sources, "principally through Aristotle and his commentators." I was wondering, which other … ancient Greek commentators on Zeno are known? I would be especially interested to know which (if any) great ancient Greek mathematicians are known to have commentated on Zeno. …
asked Apr 2 '18 by Asker
22
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6answers
explanation. What serious arguments exist that counter Aristotle's objection, if any, and why is Aristotle's objection not considered a resolution to this paradox? …
asked Aug 11 '15 by martin
2
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2answers
Zeno’s arrow paradox says that motion is impossible. Does quantum mechanics say that the underlying assumption is wrong? Assumption: in any given moment, an arrow in flight is motionless. Then it … remains stationary at every moment. Thus the arrow never moves. Mazur, Joseph; The motion paradox (New York: Dutton), p. 4-5. Here is quantum mechanics: One striking aspect of the difference …
asked May 14 '18 by Mark Andrews
1
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1answer
Aristotle discusses six dialectical arguments for the non-existence of place in Physics bk. Δ On Place, ch. 1 (209a); Zeno's argument is #5: if everything that exists has a place, place too will … have a place, and so on ad infinitum Does what I call "idempotence of place" resolve the paradox?: Place is an idempotent relation because the the place of the place of something is still its place. Thus place(place)=place. Therefore place(place(place(…)))=place. …
asked Mar 1 '17 by samerivertwice

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