Skip to main content
16 votes

Isn't Camus' philosophy just a violation of Occam's Razor?

No. Your logic seems to be suggesting that to present an argument from a starting position, via intermediate steps, to a conclusion is a violation of Occam's razor because it would be simpler to drop ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 21.8k
10 votes

How can a non-religious person justify or rationalize hope or optimism in an absurd world?

How can a non-religious person justify or rationalize hope or optimism in an absurd world? Can you acknowledge the absurd and still be hopeful and optimistic? I feel like you either can acknowledge ...
Agent_L's user avatar
  • 230
10 votes

How can a non-religious person justify or rationalize hope or optimism in an absurd world?

My first comment provides the starting point for my answer. This is something that's far easier to discuss in person than it is over the limiting format of Stack Exchange. What gives people hope is ...
Cort Ammon's user avatar
  • 17.8k
9 votes

Is Sisyphus actually happy or is he content?

There is not room to quote the whole essay here, or even the whole last paragraph. They explain Camus' point pretty well. The last two sentences are: The struggle itself toward the heights is ...
Colin McLarty's user avatar
9 votes
Accepted

What is "the Nietzschean criterion" in Camus' "The Myth of Sisyphus"?

The allusion to the expression "the Nietzschean criterion" is, I think, merely internal to the present text (The Myth of Sisyphus). It is not something we the readers are supposed to know if ...
Ram Tobolski's user avatar
  • 7,401
9 votes

Why should we care about anyone?

One of the weaknesses of the Western philosophical tradition - something that Existentialism and Absurdism tried to address — is that Western philosophy discounts psychology (broadly put). It ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
  • 19.6k
8 votes
Accepted

What does Albert Camus mean by two methods of thought, "of La Palisse and Don Quixote"?

La Palisse was a French nobleman who is associated with jokes based on truisms. When he died his comrades famously made a song about it, saying "if he wasn't dead he would still be alive". ...
armand's user avatar
  • 6,324
6 votes

What are some philosophical works that explore constructing meaning in life from an agnostic or atheist view?

“There is only one really serious philosophical problem, and that is suicide. Deciding whether or not life is worth living is to answer the fundamental question in philosophy. All other questions ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
  • 21.8k
6 votes

Do humans need some agency over the world around them for their lives to have some sense or purpose?

Your question is philosophical in the broader sense of the pursuit of eudaimonia. I think a number of philosophical traditions, such as Taoism or Confucianism, have means of dealing with this. I'll ...
J D's user avatar
  • 26.6k
5 votes

How can a non-religious person justify or rationalize hope or optimism in an absurd world?

Let’s consider the three questions separately. How can a non-religious person justify or rationalize hope or optimism in an absurd world? When one reaches a contradiction one has to find what ...
Frank Hubeny's user avatar
  • 19.4k
5 votes

What are some philosophical works that explore constructing meaning in life from an agnostic or atheist view?

Evidently, this is not a common academic problem of philosophy (this forum is moreover about such academic side of philosophy), but it is a serious problem of personal philosophy. The following ...
RodolfoAP's user avatar
  • 7,416
5 votes

Do humans need some agency over the world around them for their lives to have some sense or purpose?

You're making a whole lot of (in some cases rather offensive and harmful) unsupported assertions about what can and can not give other people purpose and fulfillment, and very questionable claims ...
NotThatGuy's user avatar
  • 9,779
4 votes

Philosophical suicide

For existential philosophy, failing to grapple with the paradoxes of death (in that it explicitly limits our ability to perceive the world in its totality) and the Real (that, because our perception ...
AGentleRose's user avatar
4 votes

What is the difference between existentialism, nihilism and absurdism?

There are a few places one can go for quick online answers: Wikipedia, the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy and the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. There are other places as well, but when ...
Frank Hubeny's user avatar
  • 19.4k
4 votes

Did Camus ever really write "Should I kill myself or have a cup of coffee"?

The quote is not Camus'. But, apparently, misquoting Camus, or even fabricating quotes is something of an enterprise. Gaetani even has papaer on it The noble art of misquoting Camus. They include "I ...
Conifold's user avatar
  • 43.2k
4 votes

Why should we care about anyone?

Sartre proposes that caring is a reality of human psychology from which we cannot escape (along with psychoanalysis and a raft of feminists, but he is the biggest-name philosopher who put it clearly). ...
hide_in_plain_sight's user avatar
4 votes

Myth of Sisyphus - What is Pascalian sense?

Pascalian sense of diversion First, what does Pascalian diversion mean? This can be answered from Blaise Pascal's Pensée no. 139: Diversion.--When I have occasionally set myself to consider the ...
Philip Klöcking's user avatar
  • 13.9k
4 votes

Is Absurdism a form of hedonism?

Absurdism is a philosophy where life has no meaning, and the greatest example of it is Camus' novel "The Stranger". It's important to note that this isn't nihilistic or pessimistic. In fact, ...
TN157's user avatar
  • 418
4 votes

What are some philosophical works that explore constructing meaning in life from an agnostic or atheist view?

The autobiography of Bertrand Russell (3 volumes) shows the different fields of interest Russell developed during his life. Russell gives a short prologue: What I Have Lived For Three passions, ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
  • 32k
4 votes

Do humans need some agency over the world around them for their lives to have some sense or purpose?

Arendt shows in The Human Condition that purposeful and creative work is required for humans to be fully human. Further, it is a fallacy that simply because all work is automated means that work ...
Mozibur Ullah's user avatar
3 votes

If life is absurd, is immortality desirable?

From a purely logical perspective, the question is not answerable. The desirability of immortality does not stand in any necessary connection with whether life is absurd or meaningful. ...
Baby Boy's user avatar
  • 111
3 votes

How can a non-religious person justify or rationalize hope or optimism in an absurd world?

How negative am I painting things? How can anyone's interpretation be more right than the other? And if none are more right than the other, why should I subscribe to any one interpretation? What ...
OfficialQueensbridgeMurderers's user avatar
3 votes

What is "the Nietzschean criterion" in Camus' "The Myth of Sisyphus"?

The question Camus is asking is whether life is worth living, which, he believes, is equivalent to the problem of suicide. For the equivalence, Camus establishes such auxiliary assumptions as living ...
Nanhee Byrnes PhD's user avatar
3 votes

Did Camus ever really write "Should I kill myself or have a cup of coffee"?

Sorry for the late answer Indeed this quote does originate from Camus. In the first section of “A Happy Death”, the character Mersault stated this in conversation with the character of Zagreus, ...
datastudent02's user avatar
3 votes

Why should we care about anyone?

If 'the World is absurd - without any meaning or end result' then if caring is absurd, so is not-caring. 'Why should I care about anyone?' and 'Why shouldn't I care about someone - or everyone?' - ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
  • 35.7k
3 votes

What are the "crimes of passion and crimes of logic"?

Short Answer A thousand years ago, a person was readily culpable or not for their choices. Today, culpability is not so clear since we participate in highly complex societies built on highly complex ...
J D's user avatar
  • 26.6k
3 votes

"I rebel- therefore we exist." What does Albert Camus mean by this?

Mauro has said it nicely. I would like to add, that according to existentialism (eg Sartre), the person is confronted with her freedom. The person can only act, and can act freely in that. This is ...
Nikos M.'s user avatar
  • 2,706
3 votes

How may absurdism be relevant in our current world and recent events, such as the pandemic?

One of Camus' most famous works is a novel called The Plague, which is about a disease outbreak. I would suggest taking a look into that, as there are plenty of straightforward comparisons that can be ...
SnakeOS's user avatar
  • 31
3 votes

What are some philosophical works that explore constructing meaning in life from an agnostic or atheist view?

Modern philosophy is not generally very helpful at finding values and meaning. the best of the west for that are the existentialists, who you have already discovered. But existentialists are more ...
Dcleve's user avatar
  • 13.9k

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible