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My first comment provides the starting point for my answer. This is something that's far easier to discuss in person than it is over the limiting format of Stack Exchange. What gives people hope is an incredibly personal concept. One size wont fit all. However, if I were to cold-call this and provide an answer, it would be in the form of Alan Watt's ...


8

This question reminds me that what is so unfortunate about our society is its pessimistic attitude to philosophy and knowledge. We ought to cheer up a bit. "How can a non-religious person justify or rationalize hope or optimism in an absurd world?" Who says it's an absurd world? You'd have some difficulty proving the case.It is a conjecture. Why be ...


8

How can a non-religious person justify or rationalize hope or optimism in an absurd world? Can you acknowledge the absurd and still be hopeful and optimistic? I feel like you either can acknowledge the absurd, or lie to yourself. As you've noticed, bad things happen for no reason. But there is flip side to this randomness and absurd: good things ...


5

The allusion to the expression "the Nietzschean criterion" is, I think, merely internal to the present text (The Myth of Sisyphus). It is not something we the readers are supposed to know if we read this expression without having read the previous pages in The Myth of Sisyphus. And its understanding does not even require a previous familiarity with Nietzsche....


4

There are a few places one can go for quick online answers: Wikipedia, the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy and the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. There are other places as well, but when these sources turn up in an online search they may be worth considering. Let's just consider what Wikipedia has to say about these terms. First, let's consider "...


4

Let’s consider the three questions separately. How can a non-religious person justify or rationalize hope or optimism in an absurd world? When one reaches a contradiction one has to find what assumptions one has made that led one to the contradiction. Using a different metaphor, if one finds oneself at a dead end in a maze, one has to backtrack ...


3

The question Camus is asking is whether life is worth living, which, he believes, is equivalent to the problem of suicide. For the equivalence, Camus establishes such auxiliary assumptions as living is absurd and man should act upon his belief. Camus says there are more than two immediate answers: Yes and No. A third possible answer, according to Camus, is, ...


3

For existential philosophy, failing to grapple with the paradoxes of death (in that it explicitly limits our ability to perceive the world in its totality) and the Real (that, because our perception is limited, we are unable to find universal knowledge about the world) constitutes a harm to our ability to live to our fullest (in that we live thinking that ...


2

I up voted Cort Ammon's answer for the link to the Alan Watts video alone. But here's another approach... Your question suggests that religion is a great tool for acquiring "hope," so those who aren't religious have to work a little harder to find hope. But how do you define hope? Belief in a Heaven that may not exist might qualify as hope, but it's a ...


2

If life is absurd, immortality might be a continuation of the absurdity - and worse, because life ends but immorality goes on for ever. An eternity of absurdity! What a prospect. However, if immortality provides an extension of our ability to 'focus on other things and personal human projects', then it looks attractive - unless the other things and projects ...


2

How negative am I painting things? How can anyone's interpretation be more right than the other? And if none are more right than the other, why should I subscribe to any one interpretation? What reality is and the perception of reality that an individual has are two very different things. For example, we humans feel like we live in the present, that things ...


2

From a purely logical perspective, the question is not answerable. The desirability of immortality does not stand in any necessary connection with whether life is absurd or meaningful. Syllogistically, you are asking if A=B, does C=D follow? So what is necessary is to add some premises which link meaning or lack of it to desirability or undesirability of ...


2

(I don't have formal training in philosophy; I'm a physicist who really likes The Myth of Sisyphus; other commenters on this forum will no doubt give you a better placement of this sentiment in philosophical traditions. This is how I understand that passage in relation to the rest of the work.) Camus's Myth of Sisyphus is concerned with what he calls the ...


2

I think you need to get underneath your assertions a little. While all of your ideas about 'life, the universe, and everything' are philosophically acceptable ideas, they bare no resemblance with your experience of life. You don't experience your life as being just a cluster of atoms interacting; nor do you experience your life as having no purpose - you ...


1

Reading the whole of the text might help; just beffore the end you would find: Je veux que tout me soit expliqué ou rien. Et la raison est impuissante devant ce cri du cœur. L'esprit éveillé par cette exigence cherche et ne trouve que contradictions et déraisonnements. Ce que je ne comprends pas est sans raison. Science is ...


1

Ronald Aronson writes: Camus sees this question of suicide as a natural response to an underlying premise, namely that life is absurd in a variety of ways. As we have seen, both the presence and absence of life (i.e., death) give rise to the condition: it is absurd to continually seek meaning in life when there is none, and it is absurd to hope for some ...


1

For Foucault, like Nietzsche, there is a kind of evolutionary dynamic to knowledge. The idea of money say, is not objectively real, but a society with it will have additional capacities, which help in some ways to spread their mode of life - metaphorical truth, derived from advantage by living as though something were objectively true. Power and success in ...


1

seek out the truth. search for it in all places. explore all religions and all philosophies. don't leave any stone unturned.


1

We all know that 'Man is mortal'. We need not desire for mortality. So the thing we can desire is to become immortal. There may be personal difference in the idea of immortality. We can't deny this even if the truth is something else. It may be an immortality that transcends this absurd life. But only those who believe that there is something immortal ...


1

Sartre saw the answer in living authentically. Camus saw this as a confrontation with the absurd. Schopenhauer saw in experiencing the sublime a return to a more naturalistic state free of such concerns: https://existentialcomics.com/comic/18 Buddhist practice is aimed squarely at the matter. You may already have written it off as a dogma, but it is a ...


1

Jean-Paul Sartre made the following notion famous in his play Huis Clos (No Exit): "Hell is other people!" ( link ) Jesus said a similar thing: "I tell you, use worldly wealth to gain friends for yourselves, so that when it is gone, you will be welcomed into eternal dwellings." ( Luke 16:9 NIV ) Whether your human interactions are trivial or non-trivial is ...


1

We all know about the use of fishing hook. And it is used only by humans. I am saying about this just for reminding you of cheating by showing or giving a bait. It is some people's habit to cheat others for gaining something. Certainly, some animals also cheat; but only for their food. So it is very important to know the danger behind every action and act ...


1

Immediate pleasure isn't strictly irrational. Rationality can usually only be understood relative to some objective function. However I'll provide two points that may assist in understanding why people often consider it to be irrational. (1) Often one can gain greater pleasure in the future (or avoid future pain), by sacrificing immediate pleasure. For ...


1

I take Camus' view of absurdity as given for the purposes of the question and focus on the relative status of physical and philosophical suicide. I also concentrate on why Camus assigns the two suicides the relative status he does rather than on whether his view of absurdity justifies his preference. ▻ CAMUS' VIEW OF THE ABSURD We need just briefly to ...


1

It reminds me most strongly of Albert Camus' version of absurdism, in which people live their lives and strive towards moral choices, in spite of the "objective fact" that there is no meaning in any of it. This position is perhaps best captured in his novel The Plague which dramatizes the variant reactions of a group of villagers to an unexpected disaster, ...


1

I have not read Milan Kundera's "The Unbearable Lightness of Being", but I have come across it in a class. It seems quite similar to your description. I am unclear of the exact argument, but from what I recall, he draws on Nietzsche's concept of the "unbearable weight" brought on by the burden of eternal return. I believe Kundera refutes this burden by ...


1

Starting from Nietzsche, taking Perspectivism as the morality, I would say there is at least one established framework that applies. If the whole of reality is about negotiating power relations, and everyone is present to provide a perspective on reality and to attempt to assert will and live with maximal effect, that is not specifically about humans, it is ...


1

I think that you should take an objective scientific view. 1 The world is what it is, and is therefore in some sense 'good': it cannot help being straightforwardly 'honest'. Avalanches, mushrooms, carnivores, forest fires, ice ages, savannahs... all of these things participate in an ongoing, self-regulating balance (which also encompasses evolution, ...


1

You can see : Robert Zaretsky, A Life Worth Living : Albert Camus and the Quest for Meaning (2013), page 13: In its pages [The Myth of Sisyphus], Camus pursues the perennial prey of philosophy — the questions of who we are, where and whether we can find meaning, and what we can truly know about ourselves and the world — less with the intention of ...


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