11

Humans and other animals need to recognize favorable conditions and partners distinct from immediate prospects for obtaining a reward. It is likely that a sense of beauty is what accomplishes this. Although there are many cases of nonfunctional beauty, as long as they don't distract us too heavily, we will end up with partners who are less likely to be ...


9

I generally take characters on shows to be a different instance of the same person, that is, the name doesn't matter, but in the context of the show the actor is that same actor but in the context of the parallel universe developed for the show. Let's use object orientated because that is freakishly easy notation for this problem. (Consensus Reality).(Wil ...


8

You are asking a question with a bit of subtlety here. How much of mathematics consists of mathematical writing — that is, general attempts by the author to convey an idea (if only to themselves in the future)? And of course, what do you mean by art? Can Newtons Principia, for example, be considered an art object; or Einsteins papers? Undoubtedly ...


8

More often than not artists do not give arguments about using the golden ratio, they are sufficiently motivated by the long tradition of singling it out as "golden", which accumulated since Pythagoreans and the ancient Greek sculptor/architect Phidias. The perceived presence of golden ratios in his Parthenon now appears to be spurious, but the letter φ often ...


7

There is no universal agreed upon answer, but personally I would be a little Aristotelian about it: art has a purpose, and the degree that it is fit to that purpose is the degree that it is great art. Some would say that the purpose of art is to make our surrounding more pleasant. It is to make us feel good, so we may judge whether lots of people "like" ...


7

Are there objective criteria? There have been theories discussing criteria by which to evaluate artworks; see for example the concise exploration of "Some Theories of Aesthetic Judgment" by Harold Osborne in The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism Vol. 38, No. 2 (Winter, 1979), pp. 135-144. The question of whether any proposed criteria are ...


7

This remains an open question in philosophy. It might be possible to objectively evaluate art, but it's difficult to claim that any given attempt to do so has proven definitive. There are hundreds of different aesthetic theories, and most of them are incompatible with each other to the point of disagreeing even on what counts as art. A random selection of ...


6

The answer is going to greatly depend on what you think creativity means. If creativity is taken to mean "able to create something we find pleasant to experience", then the answer is clearly yes. If creativity is taken to mean "able to engage in a creative process" that yields a novel creation, then much will hinge on what we think such a process is. ...


6

The connection between mathematics and art goes back thousands of years. Mathematics has been used in the design of Gothic cathedrals, Rose windows, oriental rugs, mosaics and tilings. Geometric forms were fundamental to the cubists and many abstract expressionists, and award-winning sculptors have used topology as the basis for their pieces. Dutch artist M....


6

There are a few areas where "meta-mathematics" can take on political overtones: Political word problems. See Radical Math as an example of an organization that promotes this sort of thing. (Personally, I'm skeptical that this is a good idea.) Acceptance into the Mathematics profession. See this paper for one take. Women such as Sophie Germain are a rarity ...


6

Aristotle in his Poetics examines three kinds of poetry - comedy, the epic & tragedy; he says Since the objects of imitation (mimesis) are men in action, and these men must be either of a higher or a lower type (for moral character mainly answers to these divisions, goodness and badness being the distinguishing marks of moral differences), it follows ...


6

There are, as @Chris Sunami has noted, many philosophical and critical forays in this direction. In addition to those mentioned, I might add the various "sociobiological" attempts to ground an aesthetic universal, such as E. O. Wilson's "biophilia." These are perhaps closest to a materialist redescription of Kant. In fact, Kant himself preferred to look at ...


6

Aristotle, Poetics, 1451b : The real difference is this, that one tells what happened and the other what might happen. For this reason poetry is something more scientific and serious than history, because poetry tends to give general truths while history gives particular facts.


6

What makes you think that Adorno is suggesting any solution to the problem? I've not read his entire works, but what I have read provides me with no indication that Adorno saw himself in any way responsible for solving or providing solutions to the problems he laments. His definition of the role of the culture industry in controlling our emotional and ...


6

Firstly, women are not art. Women are people. You are not prohibited from seeing women as art. If you want to examine the female form as art, why not go to an art museum? Or join a life-drawing class? What you are prohibited (or at least discouraged) from doing is starting at strangers' bodies without their consent. Your intent may be entirely decent, but ...


5

Mathematics isn't art. Only art is primarily focused on emotional expression or evocation. All other things that might evoke strong emotions and feelings as a secondary objective or byproduct (an algorithm, a hand made musical instrument, a mathematical solution) aren't art. Even though we might call them "works of art" that's a superlative and ...


5

Work that is sometimes called "speculative realism" or "object oriented ontology" might interest you. Most (if not all) of it is directly in dialogue with Kant. Timothy Morton in particular deals with aesthetics. There is quite a bit of work on aesthetics since Kant. Aside from the above, Adorno's "Aesthetic Theory" comes to mind and more recently a good ...


5

It seems to me that playing yourself and being yourself are two very different things. Even in real life we often portray some version of our selves that are neither wholly distinguishable from the selves we really are, nor wholly capable of being identified with those true selves. Clearly this requires a conception of identity that might be characterized ...


5

As someone who works in both Modern Western philosophy and Classical Confucianism, I don't think one is required to do so when doing comparative philosophy unless you're using a very nuanced definition of cultural relativism. In fact, I would say you cannot do comparative philosophy if you cannot assert non-culturally relative things on at least some level. ...


5

It is natural to use it, both aim at the problem of vagueness in predicates. The Sorites paradox is as ancient as the Liar, and much more pervasive, as a list of nicknames suggests: paradox of the heap, paradox of the beard, continuum fallacy, line drawing fallacy, bald man fallacy, etc. One grain is not a heap, adding a grain to not a heap does not make it ...


5

Aristotle, in The Poetics, comes to mind. Again, a beautiful object, whether it be a living organism or any whole composed of parts, must not only have an orderly arrangement of parts [beginning middle and end?], but must also be of a certain magnitude; for beauty depends on magnitude and order. Hence a very small animal organism cannot be beautiful; for ...


5

Providing the quote for context So, let us have a look into the text proper. I will provide a full quote of the important part of section 14 (translation and non-academy pagination from the Cambridge edition, 2000, trans. by Paul Guyer and Eric Matthews). Even what one calls ornaments (parerga), i.e., that which is not internal to the entire representation ...


5

Beethoven is reported to have said (my emphases) When I open my eyes I must sigh, for what I see is contrary to my religion, and I must despise the world which does not know that music is a higher revelation than all wisdom and philosophy, the wine which inspires one to new generative processes, and I am the Bacchus who presses out this glorious wine for ...


5

Welcome, Luna. Interesting topic - how to take Bruno Latour's We Have Never Been Modern, tr. Catherine Porter. Cambridge, Mass.: 1993. An extract from an article by Daniel Clarke Waugh (2001) might be of help. Page references are to Waugh's translation : Scholarship reassessing the "Scientific Revolution" can provide some inspiration in this task [...


4

The answer is simpler than you think. "Fashion" is the effect, not the cause. Combine two separate concepts: First, that pleasure resulting from a certain aesthetic fades over time. So yes to your first question, it is the aesthetic value that changes. You can only eat ice cream so long until you get tired of eating it, even though nothing changed about ...


4

In a sense, computers are already capable of a degree of creativity. However it has always been humans who have been urging the computers to become creative - it has not been the computer that has engaged in the act of creativity for its own explorative or expressive requirements. Creativity in computers has normally been based upon one or more elements of ...


4

Of course it has, but not in some clear, fundamental shift. Aesthetics first became a central topic for philosophy with Kant, and shortly thereafter Hegel correctly diagnosed its "death." By this Hegel did not mean that art would cease to be made and enjoyed. But it could no longer serve as the basis of human development in the Greek or Christian manner, a ...


4

My personal belief is that there ARE objective aesthetic criteria. But there is no one set of these criteria that is universally, or even widely accepted. There are, however innumerable competing theories. It would be impossible to give an exhaustive list, but here are some rough glosses on a few of the most prominent and/or distinctive (several of which do, ...


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