11

First, "le sacre monstre" is bad French for "le monstre sacré" which while literally meaning "the holy monster" (thus the bad French putting the adjective in the wrong place) means "a public figure that is left alone" or isolated. Many continental philosophers see Hegel as evil and the source of problems, thus the devil role. He's often a target for ...


10

A good paper to read on this subject is an old classic: Gilbert Ryle's Systematically Misleading Expressions. (Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, 32: 139-170 (1932). Also in his Collected Papers, vol 2.) Ryle's view is that ordinary non-philosophical use of language frequently contains "improper" usages, by which he means usages that, while having a ...


8

Frankly, the terms analytic and continental are not especially meaningful when applied to contemporary philosophers. Let me explain what I mean by that. Sure, there have been and still are clearly analytic and clearly continental philosophers. No one would confuse Carnap or Quine with continental philosophy. And no one is calling Foucault, Heidegger, ...


8

Good overviews of the more recent history of analytic philosophy are Burge's Philosophy of Language and Mind: 1950-1990 and Philosophy of Mind: 1950-2000 (ch.20), the philosophy of science side in a very lively and polemical form is described in Zammito's Nice Derangement of Epistemes, "the best history of post-positivist philosophy and sociology of ...


8

Here is some historical context. In Grundlagen der Arithmetik (1884) Frege introduced his ill-fated Axiom V, now known as the axiom of unrestricted comprehension: every predicate defines a class of objects that satisfy it, called its extension (Frege's own formulation is more technical). This led to the set of all sets and then to the Russell's paradox in ...


7

This is a deceptively complex question, and very on the nose when it comes to Tractarian interpretation. My line on this is to say that we need to pay attention to the distinction in the semantics of TLP between "Propositions" (the German "Satz") and "Elementary Propositions" ("Elementarsatz"), and to note the theoretical difficulties in explaining how to ...


7

This is not an easy question. The first problem is that the German ‘bedeuten’ means something like ‘mean’ or ‘signify’ or ‘indicate’, which led to the translators changing the translation from ‘reference’ in the original edition to ‘Meaning’. Thus ‘sense and Meaning’, not ‘sense and reference’. This was controversial. The second is that Frege seems to have ...


7

Early analytic philosophy did reject "metaphysics." But it's important to understand why they would be motivated to do so. The answer for English-speaking ones is the Oxford Hegelians. In other words, Hegel (or at least an interpretation of it) was the dominant philosophy in the English-speaking world in the 19th century. One of the humorous details of how ...


7

For many people, Kuhn's notion of the incommensurability of paradigms is a form of postmodernism. So then there is not a conflict, the Philosophy of Science has notable post-modern contributors, who are well respected (if embattled). But post-modernism is not a single coherent theory of its own, it is a variety of results that leave a given impression: The ...


6

I am not terribly optimistic that the division will be overcome in any sort of principled way. After all, the analytic and continental divide is still alive and well, and to mend that one there isn't even a need to be versed in a second field. One problem is that science works. Scientists don't, therefore, have much incentive to mend anything with "...


6

Yes, I believe Hegel has been treated largely with hostility or neglect in the analytic camp from the time Russell accused him "simple logical errors."Russell himself was originally steeped in Hegel, Bradley, and the British idealists, so his renunciation carried weight. (As the famous weather report goes: "Fog Over Channel, Continent Cut Off.") The parting ...


6

Kripke's Naming and Necessity, definitely. If any of Quine's books counts as a magnum opus, it would probably be Word and Object. Other seminal works in analytical philosophy include Austin's How to Do Things with Words; Gilbert Ryle's Concept of Mind; Strawson's Bounds of Sense. I'd like to include David Lewis' Plurality of Worlds too, but I find his modal ...


6

The first four chapters of The Oxford Handbook of The History of Analytic Philosophy are available for free from that webpage. The four chapters are: "What is Analytic Philosophy?" "The Historiography of Analytic Philosophy" "Chronology of Analytic Philosophy and its Historiography" "Bibliography of Analytic Philosophy and its ...


5

Analytic philosophy has taken quite a few different developments. I'll use some Quine and a little bit of Kuhn in order to show what the expression of "hasn't been proven" might mean in analytic philosophy and how this may answer your question. According to Quine to exist is to be the value of a bound variable. Variables are bound by quantifiers to form ...


5

'Eichmann in Jerusalem' by Hannah Arendt discusses the questions of "what could the Jews do?" and "Why did they permit themselves to be led, like sheep, onto trains; into camps?" Arendt was a Jew that attended the trials after the war was over and asks many of the controversial questions. I don't wish to ruin the answer to these questions by quoting the book,...


5

In a nutshell, the issue arises from the definition of number of as a second-order concept (i.e. a numerical quantifier) in Die Grundlagen der Arithmetik (1884). Consider e.g. 0xϕ(x)=df Card[xy] (y ≠ y) [ϕx], that reads: To assert 0xϕ(x) is to say that the objects that are ϕ are in one-to-one correlation with the objects that are not self-identical, i.e....


5

I think the error here is that Analytic Philosophy can be succinctly summed up as though it was this tangible specific concept. There was a reaction against Hegel's grand, sweeping yet obscure proclamations about reality. Such abstraction made philosophers realize just how much we take for granted regarding language and words. This led them to examine ...


5

You can get an MA in philosophy in the US without doing an undergraduate in philosophy. If you do so, most programs will be looking for a strong background in analytic skills (here not with the exact meaning it has in "analytic philosophy") such as a hard science, math, or other difficult degree. The University of Chicago has a masters in humanities where ...


5

There is something to it, but things are more complicated. Sellars was not arguing against Husserl specifically, it is unlikely that he was even familiar with his phenomenology. He does draw on the continental tradition, unusually for an analytic philosopher, but mostly on Kant and Hegel. And his primary target were sense data theorists like his father, ...


4

Try A Thing of This World: A History of Continental Anti-Realism (2007). Here is the Worldcat Link. It follows the tradition after Kant from Hegel through Derrida, and argues that it has involved a debate between realism and anti-realism paralleling that among analytic philosophers, but in different terms. Also, while I'm at it, you might look at several ...


4

I can imagine that it may often be difficult for responses on philosophy.stackexchange to be correctly called 'answers' since there must always be room for interpretation and evaluation in philosophical matters, but allow me to give you my views on your question and from it perhaps you will be able to discover an answer for yourself if not for everyone. ...


4

I think that for an understanding Wittgenstein's "solution", you must take in account the original (historical) context. Wittgenstein was a student and disciple of Frege and Russell. According to Frege (see his immediate response to Russell's letter communicating to him the discovery of the Paradox), Russell's form of the Paradox ( f(f) ) was not ...


4

Well there is Analytical Marxism Of the names mentioned, G.A. Cohen is probably the most prominent or at least he's the name I've seen the most in my personal experience. His book Karl Marx's Theory of History: A Defence is often suggested to people who might otherwise recoil with repugnance towards the Marxist concept of dialectical materialism. I think ...


4

EDIT 23, September 2015 I am updating my answer because my original reply was based on the misunderstanding that the A-series and the B-series are logically equivalent; this misunderstanding being based on an incorrect SEP article on Time which asserts they are "identical". Your question asks: can a proponent of A-theoretic time avoid the contradiction ...


4

See John Perry's A Dialogue on Personal Identity and his Dialogue on Good, Evil and the Existence of God. Furthermore some of David Lewis's smaller pieces (written together with Stephanie Lewis) are dialogues: 'Holes' and a review of Casati and Varzi's Holes and Other Superficialities


4

Here are a few examples of books using the dialogue form: Worlds Apart: A Dialogue of the 1960's by Owen Barfield (1963) is written in the form of a fictional dialogue. Corydon by André Gide (1911) contains four Socratic dialogues on homosexuality. Peter Kreeft published several books that are fictional dialogues between Socrates and a more recent ...


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