4

There is something to it, but things are more complicated. Sellars was not arguing against Husserl specifically, it is unlikely that he was even familiar with his phenomenology. He does draw on the continental tradition, unusually for an analytic philosopher, but mostly on Kant and Hegel. And his primary target were sense data theorists like his father, ...


3

One cannot get around Quine's objection to analyticity simply by appeal to stipulated definitions. For one thing, the vast majority of words in a natural language such as English don't have stipulated definitions. Carnap is not a deity who hands down definitions on tablets of stone that we are obliged to use. Lexicographers do not stipulate definitions when ...


3

Edward Feser, speaking in the context of the philosophy of mind regarding arguments between dualism and materialism, claims that the "positivist" view that the OP presents is common and is indeed a misunderstanding of philosophical argumentation. (page 234) A related misunderstanding - and this time, one that even many philosophers are prone to - is to ...


3

You seem to be conflating all of analytic philosophy with philosophy that somehow depends upon the analytic/synthetic distinction, or somehow derives from a set of standards that depends upon that distinction, which is an error. Most academic philosophers today--and I assume the survey you refer to targeted mostly them--while influenced by philosophers ...


2

Wittgenstein is getting at the idea that any formal system rests on certain arbitrarily-chosen conventions, and by choosing different arbitrary conventions we can create different formal systems that represent exactly the same physical reality. For instance, because of early history we habitually do plane geometry on a flat plane with orthogonal axes. Thus, ...


2

'Analytic philosophy' has evolved into an equivocal term. At one point in time it denoted a somewhat cohesive movement in philosophy, including the likes of Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, etc. It involved a self-conscious rejection of the Hegelian influence in Britain and America and it rejected speculation, metaphysics, etc., instead striving to ground ...


2

Actually, the claim 'Dogs generally bark' is synthetic, not analytic. How would one ever know that they generally bark without hearing them bark, and frequently (for the 'generally' part). In fact, how would one even have the concept of barking without first hearing barking, or that it is dogs that bark without hearing barking from dogs?


2

Read John Zammito’s A Nice Derangement of Epistemes: Post-Positivism in the Study of Science from Quine to Latour. (https://www.amazon.com/Nice-Derangement-Epistemes-Post-positivism-Science/dp/0226978621), which assiduously tracks the movement in the 20th Century from traditional epistemology and philosophy of science to the sociology of knowledge and of ...


1

Your post seems to involve two question. A first shallower and a second deeper one. The first question: "Why does the very mathematics work that has been axiomatically developed in the 20th century"? The semi-obivous answer: Because it has been axiomatized exactly in order to render mathematical results which were in use in the empirical sciencies for ...


1

This answer only provides some references that might be worth exploring in searching for the desired tools relevant to SOPHERE's conference call for abstracts. (The deadline for submissions was last July so I assume this question is to help the OP better explore this field.) In Mark Wynn's overview of the phenomenology of religion, the bibliography cites one ...


1

I think your proposition is actually reversed. Rather than mathematics being the culmination of analytic philosophy, analytic philosophy was an effort to rebuild philosophy on the already-proven ground of mathematics and the natural sciences. People like Frege, Russell, and (early) Wittgenstein leveraged mathematical methods to try to build a more ...


1

I would agree that the philosophical stance which most directly advocates for Herbrand semantics as the "correct" semantics is term formalism. However, as conifold commented Herbrand semantics is not bound to any particular philosophical framework. (Indeed, one of the strengths of mathematics is its foundation-independence.) However, there is an interesting ...


1

The options I know have texts in searchable formats, but none is specific to major works or neatly organized like Gutenberg's Philosophy Bookshelf. You'll have to know the names and the authors you are looking for. PhilPapers: They try to list all books and publications in academic philosophy journals. Not all of it is freely accessible, sometimes they just ...


1

Internet Archive has some texts that may be useful. As an example consider C. K. Ogden's translation of Wittgenstein's Tractatus. Copyright is listed as Public Domain Mark 1.0. There is an option to download this in multiple formats including pdf and full text. Other texts are available.


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