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4

There is something to it, but things are more complicated. Sellars was not arguing against Husserl specifically, it is unlikely that he was even familiar with his phenomenology. He does draw on the continental tradition, unusually for an analytic philosopher, but mostly on Kant and Hegel. And his primary target were sense data theorists like his father, ...


2

Wittgenstein is getting at the idea that any formal system rests on certain arbitrarily-chosen conventions, and by choosing different arbitrary conventions we can create different formal systems that represent exactly the same physical reality. For instance, because of early history we habitually do plane geometry on a flat plane with orthogonal axes. Thus, ...


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The laws of nature do not describe the phenomenon of nature, they only present the foundation required to understand phenomena of nature, as Wittgenstein mentions later that in the past, people gave God and fate the same inviolable status as they give to the scientific laws now.Mechanics revolves around simple axioms that are treated as inviolable and the ...


0

Before: doubt is related to truth. Not the absolute truth or a philosophical truth, but personal truth. A doubt exist when a concept can be related either with truth of falsehood. For example, my son has my keys can be true since he usually hides your keys, but can be false since he says he is not hiding them. So, doubt is the inability to relate a concept ...


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