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1

" Persue good" can be translated as " What is to be persued is the good". But what is " the good"? it is by definition " what is to be persued". So the original statement means " What is to be persued is what is to be persued". An analytic statement indeed, since the predicate is contained in the subject ( in fact, it is identical to the subject, which ...


1

So, this seems to be a question of philosophy of language and epistemology since it is predicated about notions of the analytic-synthetic divide, questions regarding syntax and semantics, and is examining propositions in light of their linguistic modality. To wit: If imperatives don't have subjects, then how can we describe them as "analytically ...


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1: Analytic: a bachelor is by definition an unmarried man; an unmarried man is by definition a bachelor. As you can see, there is nothing we can see that might render the sentence as a function of external state of affairs. Perhaps these examples are easier to grasp: 1+1=2 or i²=-1; they are true by virtue of meaning within their respective framework. 2: ...


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"S is P" ( S for subject, P for predicate) is analytic iff its negation is contradictory ( due to the fact that the concept of the predicate is contained, as says Kant, in the concept of the subject). " Some bachelor is married" is clearly contradictory. Is " Some apple is not a fruit" contradictory. Can we conceive of a possible world in which something ...


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Welcome, Tzetachi. While (1) is widely regarded as analytic, i.e. true by virtue of the meaning of words, I don't think it is a priori, known or knowable independently of or prior to experience. For one thing, you need to know the English language in order to understand it, and that knowledge is not a priori. More than that, the concepts of 'bachelor' and '...


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