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I agree it's a flawed argument. The base concept comes from Bayes' theorem, to the effect that if you randomly choose a member of a set, the characteristics of that member are most likely to be the most common characteristics found in the set as a whole. In other words, if you have a bag full of red and blue balls, and the ball you randomly pick out is red,...


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As it became clearer by your comment to the answer of @JordonS: I think the difference is made through a notion of agency, while this difference is hard to sustain within Dennett's conceptual framework. First, let me apply the definition to digital identity in common-sense terms: (2) and (3) seem to be true, by mere being a representation of a person (or ...


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Here are a few resources that address different philosophical-anthropological aspects of your question. I haven't come across one resource that covers everything, but will checkout Chris Sunami's suggestion. Greek (and Roman) Philosophy and Christian Revelation Greek thought came in multiple waves: the Eastern portion of the Church (today's Orthodox ...


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I think what you're looking for is "comparative religion." There are any number of texts out there --one I found particularly good is Karen Armstrong's History of God, although it strongly focuses on the so-called Abrahamic religions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam). One thing I learned in my studies of comparative religion is that there are certain general ...


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Yes and no. At the time of birth we are given a lot of properties no-one intended us to have, and even if someone wanted us to have blond hair and we turn out to have blond hair, no-one intentionally designed us to have blond hair (with increasing possibilities of genetic manipulation this might change one day). This applies to almost all of our anatomy, ...


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Are humans artifacts? Short answer: No. Longer Answer: UPDATED ANSWER FROM THE COMMENTS To say that you are a creation of your parents, and then go on to describe how a table or a cabinet is created by a designer/maker, would be to change the meaning of 'create' partway through. If I push a snowball off a mountain, it may or may not gather speed and pick ...


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Experimental philosophy studies people's intuitions about philosophical questions. It has nothing to do with anthropology. In many philosophical debates philosophers appeal to intuition, and especially intuitions about certain thought experiments. For instance, there is the famous Gettier problem, according to which knowledge isn't justified true belief. ...


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At first I didn't understand why you tacked that question onto the end about the pleasure principle, I thought your question would surely be about Freud's Oedipus complex. Then I began to see you have in all likelihood asked a more advanced question. My Freud is rusty, but I will try to give you an answer, such as it is. No they were not able to fully ...


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You are already born. This is a fact, knowledge you have. You know you are in the first 100 billion people, because that is approximately the number estimated for total humans born until now. The doomsday argument argues that, given that: there is a finite number of humans that have been and will ever be born principle of indifference, you are equally ...


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I wouldn't put too much time into interpreting his aphorisms, but Wittgenstein's perspective might shed some light on the subject for you. "As long as there continues to be a verb 'to be' that looks as if it functions in the same way as 'to eat' and 'to drink', as long as we have the adjectives 'identical', 'true', 'false', 'possible', as long as we ...


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I don't have a clear picture of Taussig's discussion of this topic as I have not read him in a long time, but your closest bet to getting a Deleuzian response to this question would be via the work of Eduardo Viveiros de Castro, particularly in Cannibal Metaphysics. He does perhaps the most or any contemporary author to flesh out the transformation Deleuze ...


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