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11 votes
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Naturalism and anti-realism in the philosophy of science

The problem you will encounter here is that the main overlap between these two areas is science. Science itself, to be blunt, doesn't really care about philosophy very much, and so it doesn't have a ...
Kevin's user avatar
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8 votes
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How can a moral antirealist make moral normative claims?

How can a moral antirealist make moral normative claims? When I say or hear "X is wrong" or "people shouldn't do Y", etc., I generally understand these as abbreviations for "...
ac15's user avatar
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7 votes

How can a moral antirealist make moral normative claims?

There is no inconsistency there. You can deny the existence of absolute moral principles, yet recognise that man-made moral rules are useful and should be respected. Indeed, I could make an argument ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
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5 votes
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How do we know that the superposition of states in quantum mechanics is a real phenomenon? Does this have philosophical significance?

The embarrassing truth for physics is that the ontology of quantum theory remains unclear. I might have some objections to your suggestion that electrons might 'disappear' between measurements- ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
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5 votes

Why be moral and moral anti realism

But subjective preferences are often determined by reason. We are capable of choosing what we want, in order to get what we really, ultimately want. You're hungry. So, you decide you want a hamburger. ...
causative's user avatar
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4 votes

How can a moral antirealist make moral normative claims?

One way is to distinguish between, "It is a fact that..." and, "It is true that..." or then to differentiate between forms of truth (one might invoke the notion of multiple ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
4 votes

Why be moral and moral anti realism

It's a mistake to think of morality in individualistic terms. We don't just 'choose' to be moral because it tickles our fancies; we accept the constraints of morality because it's a social ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
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3 votes

Realism vs Antirealism...why does it matter?

I assume your question is about scientific realism. The debate can be framed as a question concerning what science aims to achieve, and what it's successful at: is it at discovering the fundamental ...
Quentin Ruyant's user avatar
2 votes
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What is the difference between instrumentalism and operationalism?

Instrumentalism is a pragmatic school of thought which asserts what is real (ontology) and what is true (epistemology) are ideas that aren't answerable and thus is an antirealist position. This is ...
J D's user avatar
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1 vote

How can a moral antirealist make moral normative claims?

words don't have meanings, only effects. the words 'x is wrong' don't correspond to some moral fact even if moral facts do indeed exist. i say 'x is wrong' about some x that i personally dislike ...
Silver's user avatar
  • 111
1 vote
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Could Dummettians use indefinite extendibility to get around Fitch's paradox?

I don't see how it matters, given that Fitch's Paradox doesn't rely on any sort of complete set, but only on specialization. It goes from the Knowability Principle (KP) ∀p(p→◊Kp) to the paradoxical ...
David Gudeman's user avatar
1 vote

Canonicity and moral fictionalism

There's a good case for morality as emerging from storytelling. Having a shared set of well-known stories, like the old testament, or the vedas, gives a shared context of reference. Your picture of ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
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1 vote

How do we know that the superposition of states in quantum mechanics is a real phenomenon? Does this have philosophical significance?

The principle of superposition of quantum states says: If a particle is prepared to be in the superposition state alpha |lambda> + beta |mu> with complex numbers alpha, beta satisfying |alpha|^2 ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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1 vote

How do we know that the superposition of states in quantum mechanics is a real phenomenon? Does this have philosophical significance?

If it is in fact the case that your alternative theory is equivalent in terms of empirical observations and predictions to the superposition theory, then it is not actually an alternative at all, but ...
Lowri's user avatar
  • 701
1 vote

Does astrophysical anti-realism solve the fermi paradox?

It depends why it's not 'real'. If we are all in a simulation, there remains to make an accounting why simulating aliens isn't involved. If it's the Zoo Hypothesis, that aliens are refraining from ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
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1 vote

Does astrophysical anti-realism solve the fermi paradox?

It is not necessary to "manipulate" a star for example in any way at all in order to measure its brightness, temperature, spectrum, composition, and distance from us. We know a lot about the ...
niels nielsen's user avatar
1 vote

Resources on the distinction between epistemology in pure and applied mathematics

Welcome TomKern, I hereby attempt to give you the answers you are seeking. Don't hesitate to correct me if I misunderstand or am unclear. I'll give you the whizbang tour. First off, when I talk of &...
J D's user avatar
  • 28.2k
1 vote

Reference Request: Defense of the A-priori/A-posteriory distinction against psychological attacks

It is common to distinguish what is a priori knowable from what is a posteriori knowable. The distinction itself is not really what needs defending. Rather, there are many advocates of radical ...
Bumble's user avatar
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1 vote

Naturalism and anti-realism in the philosophy of science

Short Answer They are not orthogonal. In the general case, most philosophers of science reject the supernatural as a working principle and then take a position somewhere in the realist-anti-realist ...
J D's user avatar
  • 28.2k
1 vote

How does constructive empiricism differ from instrumentalism?

There are different versions of instrumentalism, but a typical version states that the only factual content that scientific theories have is observational (or empirical). In other words, all the non-...
Sebastian's user avatar
1 vote

Is there a fact of the matter? , a case [of the matter]?

The posted answers will work, and are appreciated (and given my vote), but, I'll go with Hillary Putnam, who long ago said (somewhat in the context of the other answers here), "There is no fact of the ...
gonzo's user avatar
  • 1,875
1 vote

Is there a fact of the matter? , a case [of the matter]?

According to Wittgenstein, well a formed sentence expresses a proposition. A proposition is an abstract construction in logical space and shares what he calls a 'form' with sets of entities. A state ...
Allen More's user avatar
1 vote

Is there a fact of the matter? , a case [of the matter]?

Your formulation "this is the fact of the matter" is similar to Wittgenstein's formulation in the Tractatus of the most general form of a proposition: "This is how things stand" (Tractatus Logico-...
l_ruth_'s user avatar
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1 vote

References for the Realism/Anti-Realism debate in Logic

Looking at your profile before answering, this is a very tough question. The perennial realism/anti-realism debate essentially boils down to whether and how language (formerly -- pre 20th Century -- ...
gonzo's user avatar
  • 1,875

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