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1 vote

Why does this explanation seem wrong?

The difference between an argument and an explanation is qualitative; they are slightly different language games, as follows: An explanation conveys details about settled knowledge, purely for ...
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1 vote

Why does this explanation seem wrong?

Afaik explanation is literally Latin for "to stretch out" to "ex = out" and "planare = make plane, spread", so it's just filling in more details. While an argument is ...
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0 votes

Proper name for "affirming the common ground" fallacy / rhetorical technique?

Short Answer No. This isn't a fallacy. Yes. There is a common term for this phenomenon in rhetoric. It's called "framing the debate or argument". Framing in a more extended sense has become ...
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1 vote

Proper name for "affirming the common ground" fallacy / rhetorical technique?

I don't think this is a fallacy, and while it might be categorized as a rhetorical ploy, it's honestly just part of reasoned argumentation. What's lacking (usually) is followthrough, but that's a ...
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0 votes

What makes the Hitler analogy weak?

Does the overuse of an analogy contribute to its weakness? Yes, in the same way that familiarity breeds contempt.
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0 votes

Logical Fallacies: Difference between Appeal to popularity and Appeal to Authority

Ad Populum: "God exists because most people believe it" (that is, the proposition is correct because the majority takes it as correct). Ad Verecundiam: "God exists because Aristotle, ...
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1 vote

Logical Fallacies: Difference between Appeal to popularity and Appeal to Authority

I mean under the hood all fallacies are non sequitur, meaning that the conclusion doesn't follow from the premise. So all of them will, in some regard, be similar to each other. In terms of the appeal ...
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0 votes

Logical Fallacies: Difference between Appeal to popularity and Appeal to Authority

An authority is a person or institution in whom the public, or a particular section of the public (e.g. those within a religious tradition), vests confidence. To appeal to authority is to seek ...
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0 votes

Logical Fallacies: Difference between Appeal to popularity and Appeal to Authority

Appeal to popularity: "It is a popular view that Y is so, thus Y is so" Is a fallacy since the assertion does not follow from the premises, because there are reasons other than the fact that ...
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-2 votes

Logical Fallacies: Difference between Appeal to popularity and Appeal to Authority

Appeal to authority is not a fallacy. The fallacy is appeal to inappropriate authority. For an extended discussion of this, see: https://ses.edu/logical-fallacies-101-appeal-to-authority-ad-...
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-2 votes
Accepted

What makes the Hitler analogy weak?

Reductio ad Hitlerum. According to Leo Strauss who coined it, this can be a form of ad hominem, ad misericordiam, or a fallacy of irrelevance. See also Godwin's Law, coined to describe how partison ...
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-1 votes

What makes the Hitler analogy weak?

The Hitler/Nazi comparison is one of the most common analogies in informal debates and political arenas. I mean those are basically the blitz chess versions of discussions where it's about your ...
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3 votes
Accepted

Name of fallacy: amplifying weakness of weak arguments while ignoring strong ones

This is known as a weak man argument, inspired by the phrase 'straw man'.
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1 vote

Name of fallacy: amplifying weakness of weak arguments while ignoring strong ones

It might be said that Rob is being Hermeneutically uncharitable. That is, Rob is trying to defeat Bob, rather than engage in useful discussion. Daniel Dennett might say Rob is engaging in the tendency ...
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4 votes

Name of fallacy: amplifying weakness of weak arguments while ignoring strong ones

This sounds similar to the argument from fallacy. The argument from fallacy is when a person says that if a particular argument for X is fallacious, then X must be false. Rob is doing something like ...
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0 votes

What exactly does 'Some' mean in Logic?

What exactly does 'Some' mean in Logic? The expression "some dogs" refers to at least one dog or possibly to all dogs. It does so without specifying which particular dogs. The dogs in the ...
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