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I'm going attempt rolling Bumble's and Hypnosofil's responses into something and add a dash of background NB: This has been challenged as a mischaracterization. See the comments below. Short Answer Yes and no. One way logic can be dichotomized is between the formal and informal, and the answer to your question depends on the types of logic you choose. ...


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In addition to Hypnosifl's comment, there is another way to think about what is happening here. When making statements about the real world, as opposed to mathematical statements, we take for granted that such statements are typically merely highly probable, not certain. When the prosecutor says, "if the accused man committed the murder, he had an ...


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Short Answer Yes. The fallacy is known as false equivalence, and in English is often described with the idiom 'comparing apples and oranges'. Long Answer In your example, both examples, murder and cutting in line are ethical violations, however, to conflate the two as equally abhorrent morally would be a profound injustice. (Yes, intended.) Why is it ...


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Short Answer The answer is yes and no. Philosophical theory itself does not because philosophical texts are largely exercises in defeasible reason conducted in natural language which is far more syntactically and semantically complex than artificial language. However, formal logic, like problems conducted in Fitch, can have trivial solutions. Long Answer The ...


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No, it cannot. Logic itself can "rationalize" any belief. But "proof," in any scientific or juridical sense, entails empirical evidence to support the reasoning. A great deal in the evolution of philosophy addressed this very issue. The Platonic dialogues concern the evils of specious reasoning by the Sophists and Rhetoricians, who taught ...


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Another strange example of something being both empirical and a priori would be the existence of time itself. Human Beings, perhaps not very well and strongly, do indeed have an "internal clock" built-in. The observer can tell that time has passed very roughly, even when deprived of the traditional senses. At the same time, if you leave an apple ...


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I believe it is possible for arguments to be logically valid but not truth-functionally valid, in that they appeal to logic but are false in reality. For example, consider how a herd of bison will run toward anything that scares them. Logically, if something is scared it either runs away or stays very still, right? And this is true for nearly all living ...


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The usual rejection is the principle of falsifiability, also known as the verification principle. It demands that for any statement to mean anything, it must be possible to test it for truth or falsehood. Untestable statements are meaningless, they are "not even wrong". This principle pretty much defines the logical positivist school of philosophy, ...


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Correlation of accepted information can be used to construct algorithms that determine a robot‘s function. But academia alone can be cold and unforgiving. How does any of that relate to the heart and soul of a society that nurtures life? Human life in particular. Love for our fellow man comes from somewhere beyond the realm of academia. The point I’m ...


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