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Perhaps you have in mind the following possibility. There is no indication from the example that A has noticed X, Y or any relationship between them. But when alerted to the fact that there a correlation between X and Y, when Y occurs the possibility or probability that X has occurred or will occur acquires an interest or importance or just plain curiousity ...


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The narrative fallacy The narrative fallacy involves selecting a sequence of events, say in a person's life or in the history of a nation, and reading cause and effect between events in the earlier part of the sequence and events in the later. One might, for instance, produce a narrative in which I grew up in the countryside, my parents were farmers, my ...


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This would be a straight-forward case of "absence of evidence is not evidence of absence" or what is called argument from ignorance. As the article states: This represents a type of false dichotomy in that it excludes the possibility that there may have been an insufficient investigation to prove that the proposition is either true or false. Hence it is ...


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The Just Like Hitler Maneuver is an example of affirming the consequent, which produces an invalid conclusion. The argument, if that is the word, goes like this: Hitler and His Nefarious Ilk all liked ice cream. You like ice cream. Thus: You are just like Hitler. The minor premise affirms the consequent (ice cream) of the major premise. The reasoning ...


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Some texts call the fallacy of an appeal to a Nazi comparison to be "Reductio ad Hitlerum" or 'argumentum ad Hitlerum' (in this case 'Hitler' and 'Nazi' are synonymous or interchangeable). The nice thing about informal logic is that an argument made in a natural language often require us to paraphrase it so that it can be presented as an actual argument. ...


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SHORT ANSWER Is it a fallacy? Yes and no. LONG ANSWER First Context A fallacy is by most definitions a bad and persuasive form of argumentation, and to some extent, that is driven by context. In this case, the context of the argument dwells on the concept of rights. So, one has to address the question, what are a student's rights, and where do they come ...


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Your question could use examples. Either an ad hominem [what relevance is my gauche shirt to this discussion], or, depending on the seriousness of the discussion, the fallacy of irrelevant conclusion [what relevance is it that I think it's a nice shirt] may apply, to one or other of the parties. I've been in lots of discussions where someone is not ...


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