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There is no textual evidence which shows any early Greek Philosopher-(from Thales to Epicurus) quoting or commenting on The Old Testament. Both Pythagoras and Plato were reported to have traveled to Israel and the greater Middle East, though there is no reliable textual evidence which proves this. It is certainly in the realm of possibility that Pythagoras ...


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First of all, ideas are entirely dependent on brain processes. You have a pattern of neural activity which can be interpreted as an idea, in the same way that a pattern of water molecules can be interpreted as a crashing wave (if it has the right arrangement). The mind is not the same as the brain; the mind is an abstract model of a part of what the brain ...


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Here's my take from Naturalism and physicalism, and minimal or no mind-body dualism All mental activities, which includes forming ideas, are brain processes. A Platonic ideal like a perfect sphere is first an activity in someone's brain. Someone who knew your brain well enough could in principle observe you thinking about a such a sphere. It is a mental ...


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How is the syllogism in my question called? Fallacious. It is based on equivocation, that we can can avoid rewriting it as follows: "All mortals are males. Alice is mortal. Therefore she's a human." What we get is not a valid syllogism; see Fallacy of four terms. The definition of "valid syllogism" is about a FORMAL linguistic pattern....


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The complete quote is here: "The more you learn, the more you know - The more you know, the more you forget - The More you forget, the less you know - The less you know, the more you study - The more you study, the more you learn - so, why study?" and is very old, but is basically anonymous in it's complete form... Ian Gordon


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