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Aristotle Aquinas offers a clear account of the epistemic priority of Aristotelian substance in his Commentary on the Metaphysics bk. 7 l. 1: (1) It is evident too that substance is first in the order of knowing, for that is first in the order of knowing which is better known and explains a thing better. Now each thing is better known when its ...


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(1)Reading the Categories without some knowledge of Greek is a total waste of time. As a minimum you should be able to compare how the key words of Aristotle have been replaced by rather arbitrary translations. (E.g. 'ousia' is essence but the accepted word is substance; 'atom' is atom but the accepted word is individual, etc) Many such peculiarities are due ...


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Perhaps read first an introduction to classical philosophy? There are many, very good ones; I can recommend Peter Adamson's.


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See Aristole's Categories: The Four-Fold Division. [Cat,1a16] Of things that are said, some involve combination while others are said without combination. Examples of those involving combination are: man runs, man wins; and of those without combination: man, ox, runs, wins. Here A introduces the basic concept of predicate ("thing said"): predicates ...


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For Aristotle (4th century BC Greek philosopher) and St. Thomas Aquinas (13th century AD medieval philosopher/theologian), ‘substance’ is the primary category of being and is simply defined as an independent and contingently existing thing. As far as his treatment of existence is concerned, Aristotle does not develop an explicit viewpoint on this matter. ...


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