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A syllogism is a simplified form of argument, mainly used for pedagogical purposes to demonstrate valid and invalid moves in argumentation. If I may make a chess analogy, syllogisms are like a description of how individual pieces can move — part of the rules of the game — while an argument is an actual game being played.


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A Syllogism is a particular type of Deductive Argument: A syllogism (Greek: συλλογισμός) is a kind of logical argument that applies deductive reasoning to arrive at a conclusion based on two or more categorical propositions that are asserted or assumed to be true. The argument: "P and if P, then Q; therefore Q" is a valid deductive argument but ...


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Welcome, jasmine I don't know of any collection of quotations from Aristotle, which doesn't mean there isn't such a collection. There are lexicons in which key Aristotelian terms and concepts are listed and explained: for example, https://files.meetup.com/1715539/A%20Basic%20Aristotle%20Glossary.pdf I don't think a collection of quotations is what you need, ...


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Philosophy is not separate from the world; philosophy is an examination of (or interrogation into) the nature of the world. Aesthetic distinctions are a prominent — practically inescapable — feature of the world, and as such bear philosophical examination. People are driven by sensual evaluations; no one willingly chooses the less pleasing over the more ...


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Beauty as closeness to perfection To answer the question why is beauty valuable, we must first define beauty. Obviously, there was a debate about this throughout history of philosophy. Nevertheless, although we usually take the beauty to be something almost entirely subjective (beauty in the eyes of beholder) , I would try to give what is called a ...


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One important point to make is that 'beauty' and 'aesthetics' need to be distinguished. They are logically distinct. Aesthetics is a study or inquiry concerned with questions such as 'What is a work of art?', 'What is beauty?', 'How do moral and aesthetic viewpoints differ?', 'What is artistic creativity?' 'Beauty' is plainly not a study or inquiry but ...


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In Rhetoric 2.3, Aristotle discusses calmness (πραότης): among other things, calmness is directed "towards those who admit their fault and are sorry: since we accept their grief at what they have done as satisfaction, and cease to be angry" (1380a). In Nicomachean Ethics 3.1, Aristotle discusses voluntary and involuntary acts, and adds (1110b-1111a)...


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Aristotle, Nic.Eth. 1100b.30: ὄμως δὲ και ἐν τούτοις διαλάμπει τὸ καλὸν, ἐπειδὰν φέρῃ τις εὐκόλως πολλὰς καὶ μεγάλας ἀτυχίας, μη δι᾿ ἀναλγησίαν, ἀλλὰ γεννάδας ὤν καὶ μεγαλόψυχος. Yet even in these nobility shines through, when a man bears with resignation many great misfortunes, not through insensibility to pain but through nobility and greatness of soul. ...


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If the question is about a quote from Aristotle, it should include/cite the quote. Quoting from https://iep.utm.edu/aris-pol/#SH9b, which I assume is the base for the question: “[T]here is in everyone by nature an impulse toward this sort of partnership. And yet the one who first constituted [a city] is responsible for the greatest of goods” [1253a29]. We ...


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You need to get a hold of F.E. Peters book Greek Philosophical Terms: a historical lexicon. It traces the use of important words in Greek philosophy through the history of Greek writing, with detailed notes. He has several pages on each of the terms I will mention below, I'm just cherry picking what I hope is useful for you. Aristotle recognized several ...


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Aristotle Metaph X gives two relevant passages: (1053a31–5) We also speak of knowledge or sense perception as a measure of things for the same reason, καὶ τὴν ἐπιστήμην δὲ μέτρον τῶν πραγμάτων λέγομεν καὶ τὴν αἴσθησιν διὰ τὸ αὐτό, and a few pages later (1057a11) it happens that whereas all knowledge is knowable, the knowable is not always knowledge, ...


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