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1

From that passage alone, no. Merely to say that actions and passions are accompanied by pleasures and pains is merely to identify a correlation. However, if we look at BK I of the Nicomachean Ethics, then we have two details that at first glance sound like a hypothetical syllogism: The argument from the first part about intermediate and final ends and that ...


2

We have bare-bones information about Aristotle's character from various ancient sources. As to his personality reliable information is harder to come by. Criticisms of Aristotle's personality were mounted systematically for the first time by Diogenes Laertius in his 'Lives' (3rd century CE). Not only is there a gap of centuries between Diogenes and ...


2

Adam. I'll do what I can to answer your somewhat ambiguous questions. If I understand you correctly, you are asking how, precisely, eminent and virtual causality are understood and why they are classified differently. I can only make sense of that if I add an unstated observation that you consider eminent and virtual causality to be identical; hence, the ...


1

The two terms are very distinct from each other. Common sense Even "common sense" has two distinct meanings: Sensus communis "[T]he common sense (sensus communis, κοινὴ αἴσθησις) apprehends the things sensed by all the proper senses." (Summa contra Gentiles II cap. 74 [10.]). For example, when one sees and hears a person singing, his common sense ...


3

John M. Dillon / Orality in the Later Platonist Tradition/ mentions a tale "related to us by the late (2nd c. A.D.) antiquarian and collector of miscellaneous tales Claudius Aelianus, but it may well derive from a more nearly contemporary source, the 3rd c. B.C. purveyor of malicious gossip Antigonus of Carystus": Plato did not approve of [Aristotle]'s ...


3

Origin 'Common sense' in a philosophical context has often been used contrastively. For instance, Claude Buffier (1661-1737), oppposed common sense to Cartesian scepticism, or what passed for such since Descartes was not a sceptic. Bishop Berkeley (1685-1753) opposed common sense to the manifest nonsense, as he saw it, of material substance. A fully-...


4

There isn't really a ubiquitous reading of the principle of sufficient reason (PSR), so I think it's worth going over some distinctions and different formulations. There are at least two major formulations of the PSR, and several sub-formulations of each of the two major formulations (my six below are by no means exhaustive). The first major formulation is ...


3

In mediaeval philosophy, the verb " existing" is sometimes used in its strict sense. Strictly speaking " existing" means " standing out of its causes". The verb existing in this sense does not apply to God. For only an (1) actual being ( not a being "in potentia") (2) that is finite, in other words, that has a cause can be said to " exist". If "...


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Thomists affirm theism, but God would be a counterexample to your proposition as stated: God is something "that exists" in Himself; He does not "exist by something [else]". Thomists' principle of sufficient reason (PSR) A more accurate statement of Thomists' version of PSR is (Philosophical Axiom 7.1): Everything has sufficient reason of being either in ...


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