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7

A rather simple answer is that art and science follow different goals and norms: what counts as good art is not what counts as good science. Typically, science will focus on objectivity, systematicity and reproducibility, which means that scientists should ideally be interchangeable when it comes to evaluating theories, confronting theories to experience etc....


5

Beethoven is reported to have said (my emphases) When I open my eyes I must sigh, for what I see is contrary to my religion, and I must despise the world which does not know that music is a higher revelation than all wisdom and philosophy, the wine which inspires one to new generative processes, and I am the Bacchus who presses out this glorious wine for ...


3

The answer is "yes." All forms are best at conveying emotion =) The idea of excluding multi-media mediums, however, points to a very strange distinction that one must draw. One must identify the senses which are being used to convey the piece, and ensure only one sense is used at a time. That depends on where we draw the lines between the senses, so on ...


3

I think there are two main elements or aspects to Ortega's 'The Dehumanisation of Art' (La deshumanización del arte e Ideas sobre la novela, 1925; Princeton tr., 1968). The first can be illustrated by a passage from the book : A great man is dying. His wife is by his bedside. A doctor takes the dying man's pulse. In the background two more persons are ...


3

We may have two main approaches to the philosophical definition of Art: A more "traditional" one, aimed at find the essence of Art, i.e. a property (or a limited collection of properties or features) able to characterize univocally artworks. Following this approach, we cannot have too broad a characterization, that applies to all human "artifacts" or ...


3

Art is a vague term without definite boundaries. People use the term for many things, including representing something meaningful in some way or a sophisticated thoughtful way of doing something. Some people believe it requires some sort of developed skill to create something sensually stimulating with the intent of being art, although others can disagree ...


3

Perhaps not surprisingly, different philosophers disagree. Kant centers aesthetics around the judgement of the viewer. Beardsley focuses on the artistic experience. Danto considers aesthetic quality to be a function of social context. Bell focused on formal properties of the art object. Art is a subject with very little consensus in philosophy.


2

I see art and science as two sides of the same coin. Their objects are different but necessarily related. Perhaps we could see the object of science as knowledge, and the object of art as understanding. The object of philosophy would be to characterise the difference between knowledge and understanding.


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As per my understanding with regarding to art and science I would like to say Yes. I do think that art,science,engineering and sports are different field of work described as different lenses in the human mind. Science: for me its a quest for getting knowledge that will take human explore the truth. Engineering: for me its applying theoretical science to ...


2

Can science and art be described as different lenses into the human mind? Well, rather, I would propose the question be reformatted to this: Are science and art the difference lenses human mind used to look at the world? For I think there is one human mind, the different lenses won't change the human mind but they do express/depict the human mind ...


2

I think the artwork stays the same (is concrete). Then it is your mind plus the ambience of the room, or atomosphere of the place, that brings the particular experience of the work. A painting may look happy on one particular day, the same painting may look sinister that same evening (perhaps the darkness plus a ray of light strikes it in a certain way). ...


2

Do you mean : Is all knowledge in the arts based on abductive inference ? Or only that some of it is ? Abductive inference is - what ? - something like this. B needs to be explained; if A were true then B would follow with a high degree of probability; therefore there is some reason to suppose that A is true. Three comments : What of presumptive ...


2

Adorno might be interesting to you, but consider looking at certain composers who also “write” — Cage and Xenakis come to mind. Attali’s Noise: The Political Economy of Music is also highly recommended in this vein.


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Of course...music can do wonders. It can convey some strong emotions like ecstasy...but not all. In some occasions it is the best art form in conveying emotions. ( Though you have excluded films and TV as they combine base art forms) You can use them (films/TV) without combining with any sound. I mean, it can often convey many emotions especially when the ...


2

Is the value of art always contextual, or can it ever be inherent? The meaning of something arises from its relationship to something else. Some context is always necessary. So it is true with art. As centuries pass, the context changes, and so the meaning to the viewer changes, as well. I doubt that art could ever have a meaning that was "inherent", in ...


2

By "Art and objective knowledge", I suppose you're referring to the conflict between the kind of knowledge collected by science, logic, facts, experimentation, in laboratories, and which has enabled technology and industrialization, space exploration, theoretical physics... this is the knowledge at CERN, NASA, IPCC, Apple's hardware division... ...and the ...


2

Do you need to know what philosophy is to study it? I think it perfectly possible to be exercised by questions, to be involved in topics, which are (or are generally classified as) philosophical without knowing that they are philosophical. For instance, a real one in my own case, when I was studying history many years ago I started to wonder how one could ...


2

I agree with Rusi's answer. This provides another way to consider art as a form of communication even when unintended. Michael Polanyi claims the following about knowledge in general: (page 7) ...all knowledge is either tacit or rooted in tacit knowledge. If that is the case then any form of explicit communication is rooted in tacit knowledge. This may ...


2

Communication is merely the act of sharing mental contexts: thoughts, ideas, knowledge, feelings, perceptions, etc... Any human sense can be used as a channel for communication by codifying a mental context into a form perceptible to that sense. For instance, if I tap someone on the shoulder, click my tongue, and point, I can effectively communicate an ...


2

I started working at an art school a few months ago, and have since been asking myself what I think counts as art. The whole definition problem started when our cultural understanding of what art is became divorced from the concept of artisanship -- instead becoming linked to ideas about inspiration, uniqueness and genius (which lead to celebrity artists). ...


2

Questions Does art require an emotional state or an idea to be transmitted between two parties? If so, does the communication have to be intended by the author or can it be incidental? Added later (to @frankhubeny) Does art create communication? Or if art is communication? Or perhaps that the former implies the latter? Perhaps best to focus on @Eliran ...


2

For Danto, "art" is art by virtue of context. That's what makes his theory "institutionalist." It's not a continuum or a spectrum between art and non art. The relationship between a piece of art and a piece of art history is one of equivalence. That's what is meant by saying Danto "requires" the art-historical context. Danto's Transfiguration of the ...


2

I think formalism is used pejoratively by people who do not understand this natural progression in art. It was bound to happen. This was art “in and for itself”. So it went to hard essences, the materials like the canvas, the way the paint was laid on, the color registrations ( think Joseph Albers), and basic arrangements to emphasize the materials. This ...


2

Using the definition of formalism from the Tate Gallery: Formalism describes the critical position that the most important aspect of a work of art is its form – the way it is made and its purely visual aspects – rather than its narrative content or its relationship to the visible world. In painting therefore, a formalist critic would focus ...


2

Welcome, s. dragos. 'Formalism' doesn't have a fixed, single sense. Consider the following: I suggest that, in the theory of value and valuation of art work, we provisionally define formalism as a theory according to which the value of a work of art qua artwork - its artistic value-is constituted exclusively (radical version) or primarily (...


2

There are quite a few philosophers who objected that enlightenment thought the modern human either as animal rationale or homo faber, generally as a being whose particularly human traits have to be contrasted with their "natural" or "bodily" needs and existence. Nietzsche called this the Appolonian as contrasted to the Dionysian type. If you think of ...


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The quote is from Modern Painters (1843–60) in five-volume, Vol.II, part III, ch.vi, para.7. See page 53-54 : Ruskin is speaking about "the love of change as a principle of human nature", and he is argumenting against the idea that the source of "pleasantness" is the "strangeness" of objects. He asserts that : "love of change is a weakness and ...


1

One very nice recent example is the book Philosophers Explore The Matrix, consisting of serious articles by philosophers about that movie. Of course many of these ideas were around before that movie, and I believe that is a more general phenomenon: fiction and philosophy (and other disciplines) contribute to each other in both directions and it may be ...


1

Albert Camus wrote novels and stories which were considered philosophical. He did not consider himself a philosopher, however, according to Ronald Aronson: Albert Camus (1913–1960) was a journalist, editor and editorialist, playwright and director, novelist and author of short stories, political essayist and activist—and, although he more than once ...


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