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When a person is arguing some point of uncertain truth, and to justify his argument he says, "it's a fact that X," what he means is that he asserts X is true and also he considers the truth of X to be firmly supported. It may carry a connotation that his listener would be irrational not to accept X. The arguer would not say "it's a fact that ...


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To begin, we should be wary of the fact that the term 'knowledge' is used in different ways in colloquial speech, and is often the focus of highly contested political issues. 'Knowing' (in the understanding of the lay public) invokes existential security: to know something is to have a solid foundation on which further human action can rest. In the absence ...


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