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Do children adopt their parents beliefs in order to understand them?

Do their minds develop shared vocabulary and beliefs with their parents, for the specific purpose of understanding their parents, or is the mind of the child a self-determined physical thing, free ...
P R Das's user avatar
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0 votes

What is the definition of 'belief' and is it irrational to have one?

What is the definition of 'belief' A western belief is, according to the SEP, the attitude we have, roughly, whenever we take something to be the case or regard it as true You will notice that this ...
AnoE's user avatar
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-1 votes

What is the definition of 'belief' and is it irrational to have one?

A belief is not an assumption, otherwise people would use the term 'assumption' more frequently, and 'belief' less frequently. No. Trees are plants, and calling them trees all the time does not mean ...
tkruse's user avatar
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3 votes

What is the definition of 'belief' and is it irrational to have one?

A belief is any proposition you hold to be true, which implies that you will rely on it to make decisions. As always, think of designing a robot. The robot needs an internal model of the world in ...
causative's user avatar
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4 votes

What is the definition of 'belief' and is it irrational to have one?

What is the definition of 'belief'... ? A belief is a proposition that you regard as true. (And if justified and true, many would call such beliefs knowledge; but of course not all beliefs are ...
Lowri's user avatar
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1 vote

Is it epistemologically self-consistent to use the scientific method to justify some beliefs and non-scientific justifications for others?

Not really. Science doesn't lead to beliefs. Science leads to informed, supportable, repeatable/reproducible coherent conclusions. Beliefs are not typically conclusions, but instead are typically ...
Alistair Riddoch's user avatar
2 votes

Is it epistemologically self-consistent to use the scientific method to justify some beliefs and non-scientific justifications for others?

I would argue that it may be "possible" (or, rather, "non-problematic") in some cases, but that, as a general and practical consideration, no, it's not consistent. Or, rather, it's ...
FrancoisTheFrenchOne's user avatar
1 vote

Is Blaise Pascal's approach to "curing unbelief" in the proposition that God exists philosophically sound?

Little of it is philosophically sound. Pascal claims according to his beliefs that diligent following of some cults practices will make at least some people believers. There is no philosophical proof ...
tkruse's user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

Is it epistemologically self-consistent to use the scientific method to justify some beliefs and non-scientific justifications for others?

You begin your question with the term 'epistemological self-consistency'. I believe that such a term simply reduces to rationality, thus we can re-write, particularly paraphrasing the latter half of ...
J D's user avatar
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6 votes

Is it epistemologically self-consistent to use the scientific method to justify some beliefs and non-scientific justifications for others?

Assertion: I probably ought not leave the Mona Lisa in the middle of a busy road. This is a claim I have never subjected to direct experiment. Indeed, it is a hypothesis I never intend to test. Even ...
Josiah's user avatar
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5 votes

Is it epistemologically self-consistent to use the scientific method to justify some beliefs and non-scientific justifications for others?

Is it consistent? It depends... One would need to address consistency on a method-by-method basis. But if we're talking about the general principle: If one uses the scientific method for some S but ...
NotThatGuy's user avatar
4 votes

Is it epistemologically self-consistent to use the scientific method to justify some beliefs and non-scientific justifications for others?

It's not necessarily inconsistent to have beliefs justified by different methods. It's part of the human condition that life sometimes requires to make decisions based on beliefs which cannot be based ...
tkruse's user avatar
  • 4,774
-1 votes

Is Blaise Pascal's approach to "curing unbelief" in the proposition that God exists philosophically sound?

This is a rare case in which the argument can be settled by simply consulting a dictionary. From Webster's unabridged: Sophistry n. See: Pascal's Wager
Miss_Understands's user avatar
2 votes

Is Blaise Pascal's approach to "curing unbelief" in the proposition that God exists philosophically sound?

I think your understanding of a "fake it till you make it" is correct seeing the pretty obvious sentence "acting as if they believe". I would say to commenter Conifold saying "...
persephone's user avatar
5 votes

Is Blaise Pascal's approach to "curing unbelief" in the proposition that God exists philosophically sound?

A rational person wants to believe just those things that are rationally warranted. Therefore, if a rational person doesn't believe X initially, they don't want to have their belief in X changed by an ...
causative's user avatar
  • 14.4k
6 votes
Accepted

Is Blaise Pascal's approach to "curing unbelief" in the proposition that God exists philosophically sound?

I think it's important to distinguish what Pascal believes from what he's attempting to establish philosophically. He believes that if you reach out to God, even without faith, God will embrace you in ...
Chris Sunami's user avatar
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6 votes

Is Blaise Pascal's approach to "curing unbelief" in the proposition that God exists philosophically sound?

Is my understanding of Pascal more or less correct? If so, does his approach to "curing unbelief" in the proposition that God exists make sense philosophically? Your understanding of Pascal ...
mudskipper's user avatar
1 vote

Is Blaise Pascal's approach to "curing unbelief" in the proposition that God exists philosophically sound?

I think it is philosophically sound as most people who are theists are not theists through rational argument but through reasons of the heart that the mind does not know. This is why I've always been ...
Mozibur Ullah's user avatar
-1 votes

Is belief a choice or a state of being convinced with regard to a particular statement?

Your second option is correct. Belief is not a "choice" but "a state of being convinced with regard to a particular statement". There's not much else to say about this.
Mozibur Ullah's user avatar
2 votes

What sorts of beliefs can be justified non-scientifically?

Justification is supposed to be a process that shows some idea to be true or good or assign some positive status to it. Any argument uses assumptions and rules that are supposed to give true results ...
alanf's user avatar
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1 vote

What sorts of beliefs can be justified non-scientifically?

Additionally to the provided answers: All knowledge derived from Holism. excerpt from Wikipedia: "Holism in all contexts is often placed in opposition to reductionism, a dominant notion in the ...
Laurence R. Ugalde's user avatar
2 votes

Can a reliabilist have a reliably justified belief in God?

Yes, of course, reliabilism is a relativistic approach, and pretty much any belief can be justified that way, given the right conditions. As an example, a member of a cult will typically be restricted ...
tkruse's user avatar
  • 4,774
4 votes

What sorts of beliefs can be justified non-scientifically?

Justification through science is about reliability. There isn't a categorical difference between science and non-scientific sensory experiences. For the purposes of this question, science can broadly ...
NotThatGuy's user avatar
4 votes

What sorts of beliefs can be justified non-scientifically?

Can I be justified in believing in a proposition X through a justification that doesn't meet the standards of the scientific method? This is dependent on your notion of justification, though given a ...
Max Maxman's user avatar
7 votes

What sorts of beliefs can be justified non-scientifically?

There are no universally acceptable criteria for justifying our beliefs. If there had been, we would all agree on which beliefs are justified. In principle, though, everybody would probably agree that ...
Speakpigeon's user avatar
  • 8,173
13 votes

What sorts of beliefs can be justified non-scientifically?

Ethical and moral beliefs are justified but they are non scientific. Aesthetic beliefs , metaphysical beliefs , epistemological beliefs , religious beliefs , intuitive beliefs , cultural and social ...
SacrificialEquation's user avatar
2 votes

What sorts of beliefs can be justified non-scientifically?

The challenge, "For what?" is often issued on this site to any request for or issuance of a definition, rule, concept, etc. Because, it is the important aspect of those things. One part of ...
Scott Rowe's user avatar
  • 1,512
4 votes

What sorts of beliefs can be justified non-scientifically?

There is no easy or simple answer to that question, possibly the question needs more focus to be answerable. The area of philosophy dealing with this is called Epistemology. It provides significant ...
tkruse's user avatar
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