9

SOCRATES VERSUS BUDDHA ON THE SOUL If Buddhism denies the existence of any continuing self or soul, this appears to conflict with Socrates' view of a continuing soul which is freed and released from the regions of the earth as from a prison. The soul continues to exist, Socrates says, but in radically different conditions. For Buddhism there is no soul to ...


7

I think the first two concepts are not that strange: "I am having a cup of coffee" is true and only true. "I am having a cup of tea" is false and only false. But also "neither false nor true" is very common. For example if you have sentences with a wrong presupposition: "My cup of tea is cold". Since I don't have a cup of tea, it makes no sense to say if ...


7

Let me clarify what is not entirely clear from the OP quote but is apparent from the context of the paper: it is not that Indo-Tibetan thinkers do not consider what is known as Gettier cases, it is that they give a different interpretation to them. The essence of the Gettier problem is summarized very lucidly by the author (Stolz): "As long as... ...


6

Not exactly. Of course, there is a broad reading of "empirical", which includes anything somehow extracted from experience, upon which the answer is trivially yes. But on this reading God is also empirical because some people experience communicating with him. On the more conventional meaning of "empirical", the opposite of empirical is not necessarily ...


6

The Law states that “no energy can be destroyed or created..." Not quite. In its classical formulation, the 1st law says that energy is constant in a closed system. As this isn't entirely true, it has had a number of reformulations to include rest energy and virtual particles. I'm not a big fan of them, scientifically speaking, as they require you to ...


6

Several thoughts on this (1) It would help a lot if "relation" were defined more clearly. Do you mean "share similar ideas"? Do you mean that one learned from the other? Do you mean they organize the world similarly? (2) "Post-modernism" is a pretty nebulous term that refers to a lot of different things, so there's a little bit of something for everyone in ...


6

In this piece which talks about similar questions about the nature of reality and his own quasi-mystical experiences, he mentions a number of pre-socratic philosophers (Heraclitus, Parmenides, Xenophanes, Anaxagoras) along with Plato, Hume and Spinoza: The pre-Socratic Greek philosopher Parmenides taught that the only things that are real are things which ...


5

This is one of the Fourteen Unanswered Questions. There is a Buddhist Creation Myth told in the Aggañña Sutta, but it is clearly a satire and is not taken seriously.


5

In his book Western Approaches to Eastern Philosophy, Troy Wilson Organ spends an entire chapter on the Buddha’s silence regarding the nature of Nirvana. Organ says: Thus, there came to be known as the avyakrtavastuni -- the undetermined, or unelucidated, or unprofitable questions. The most comprehensive list of forbidden speculations is found in ...


4

There are three Sanskrit editions freely available. Here is the J.W. de Jong edition; here is the P.L. Vaidya edition; and here is the edition by Louis de Vallée-Poussin. The difference between them are minor.


4

Where should Buddhists draw a line? This assumes that Buddhists should draw a line. As such it seems to miss the point of Buddhism. Buddhism is about actually being aware of the consequences of your actions. When faced with a mosquito, you aren't supposed to think back in the past what someone told you about how to deal with mosquitos. You are supposed to ...


4

Indeed, I cannot find a source for this concrete story, other than the non-Buddhist source you provided, but stories of the enlightened hitting the non-enlightened followers, who were curious about enlightenment, are not uncommon. Take for example http://www.101zenstories.com/index.php?story=92: "Hakuin used to tell his pupils about an old woman who had a ...


4

The earliest example that I have heard being advanced is that of Pyrrho the ancient Greek skeptic. He travelled with Alexander the Great and would have had access to Eastern Philosophy though I don't know of any specific evidence linking him with Buddhist though. However his form of noncognitivism skeptism does seem to relate to Buddhist thought on this ...


4

It seems to me that people are disposed to accept that [i.e. loss of self and oneness with the world] without much issue — is that a fair impression? Most of the people in the West (or I should specify in the US) I have met who subscribe to some form of Eastern mysticism seem to interpret "loss of self" as "loss of selfishness" and "loss of pride", not as a ...


4

PATRICIA TURRISI, 'The Problem of the Philosophical Person', The Pluralist, Vol. 4, No. 1 (SPRING 2009), pp. 68-76, deals with the 'madness' of Socrates and William James. But it's an article, not a book, and too long to quote here. For Nietzsche : Jurgen Kleist, Zarathustra s Last Dance, SBN 10: 1448638682 / ISBN 13: 9781448638680 Published by ...


4

If enlightenment had such a meaning, all the enlightened persons would sit in some corner without doing anything. But enlightened persons realize the truth about this material world. Many enlightened persons work hard even after their enlightenment without caring about their body. They are supposed that they have transcended the limitations of their body ...


4

In his book The Fundalmental Wisdom of the Middle Way: Nagarjuna's Malamadhyamakakarika, Jay L. Garfield writes for his translation and commentary on this verse: The essence of entities Is not present in the conditions, etc... If there is no essence, There can be no otherness-essence. [Garfield's commentary] The point being made ...


3

This does not appear to be a kōan at all, but merely a story. The moral of the story is clear, but if you would like it spelled out, the master is saying (through his actions) that it is time for the disciple to stop following the master around, but to go off and learn on his own.


3

While Leibniz's theory of Monads does share quite a few parallels with Buddhist thought, the two schools of thought have some very sharp contrasts. For instance the idea of us being in The best possible world. What I found interesting is while looking into if he had any Buddhist influences I found this article. Which compares two paragraphs very similar to ...


3

There is an argument that David Hume studied Buddhist thought. He certainly was in a French provincial city which had a library with translations of some Buddhist texts into Latin.


3

I have seen comments in different readings over the years that said early Buddhist monks reached as far as Alexandria and the Greek world. There are many references. Read the heading History of Buddhism in Wikipedia. From the Wikipedia article - "Furthermore, according to Pāli sources, some of Aśoka's emissaries were Greek Buddhist monks, indicating ...


3

Regarding your statement about Buddhism I would refer you to this passage from the Pāli Canon, (the most complete extant early Buddhist canon). In contradition to your statement, it shows that Buddha expressly does not speculate on cosmology. "So, Malunkyaputta, remember what is undeclared by me as undeclared, and what is declared by me as declared. ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible